Quantcast

On "The Logic of Stupid Poor People," Or, the Only Thing Worth Reading About the Barneys "Shopping While Black" Arrests

@adorable-eggplant I didn't regret it! Lots of leaps and high kicks, too.

Posted on October 30, 2013 at 4:04 pm 1

On "The Logic of Stupid Poor People," Or, the Only Thing Worth Reading About the Barneys "Shopping While Black" Arrests

@peasofmind There is a richness to the city that makes up for a lot of things to my mind. (We speak over 300 languages! Our summers are filled with free concerts in beautiful parks!) But class in New York is strikingly obvious in ways that still take my breath away. I am from a tiny town in most rural of rural America, and in my first couple of years here that was the sharpest part of the learning curve.

Posted on October 30, 2013 at 4:03 pm 0

On "The Logic of Stupid Poor People," Or, the Only Thing Worth Reading About the Barneys "Shopping While Black" Arrests

@ThatWench Oh goodness. I saw the Broadway show recently and I felt like they were doing everything in their power to hide the fact that it is really "Unions are Awesome: The Musical."

Posted on October 30, 2013 at 2:01 pm 1

On "The Logic of Stupid Poor People," Or, the Only Thing Worth Reading About the Barneys "Shopping While Black" Arrests

@I'm Right on Top of That, Rose New York doesn't really have a downtown. It is too big and decentralized for that. What it does have, though, is a massive central zone (Manhattan and parts of the surrounding areas) with no real middle class to speak of. In order to get to a part of the city where one could reasonably except to find decent living conditions and still live without a ton of money you have to travel a long time. But the jobs are in the middle, so that 45 (probably an hour and change, to be honest) train ride is probably a fixture of our life. Twice a day. Everyday.

Posted on October 30, 2013 at 1:50 pm 1

On The OkCupid Honesty Project: An Exercise in Truth-Telling

@queenofbithynia Oh dear, I love self-deprecation and intelligently displayed low-self esteem. But I didn't much of that coming through in this- just a confessional list.

The content was not bothersome so much as the way it was presented. My point was that human touches, such as laughing at ourselves or speaking in hyperbole say just as much as who we are as lists of what we've done and what we like are. Although, to be fair, I've always loathed lists of "what I like" as a means of presenting "who I am." At best it's a shorthand. At worst its meaningless.

One of my favorite OKCupid profiles ever belonged to a friend of mine who sort of gave up and decided to just posted his D&D character sheet. It said very little in terms of the particulars of his life but it rather clearly got across who he is- a nerd with a good sense of humor who can have a laugh at himself.

Posted on October 16, 2013 at 5:20 pm 4

On The OkCupid Honesty Project: An Exercise in Truth-Telling

@cee I think part of what threw me is the impression I got that she must be incredibly dour and, as the poster below noted, self-involved. But because this is a product of the writing style and the style is supposed to be so very straight forward, I have no idea if this is true of her as a person. For all I know she might be terribly interesting to have a conversation with. Or very funny. Or a great listener. I might like or hate or be completely indifferent to this woman but I have no way of knowing because she never pauses from the patter of facts to say something of style rather than substance.

I think that you make a good point that OKCupid is a platform for a "performance of self produced for other people to evaluate by likeability." Considering that the entire point of this is to get responses from others, there's no way it could help but be the exact same thing.

Then, of course, there's the whole thing about using people's interactions to become a part of an art piece they didn't sign up for that's a bit icky but that's another story for another day. (I have strong reactions to artists treating people like subjects rather than other humans.)

Posted on October 16, 2013 at 3:17 pm 8

On The OkCupid Honesty Project: An Exercise in Truth-Telling

I am having a hard time decided whether or not this kind of truth-telling can actually be considered honesty in terms of being a portrait of someone. A list of facts about a person, no matter how intimate, conveys very little about them. So much of who we are is a product of style and reaction. Humor, patience, consideration, derisiveness, condescension, curiosity, and so forth, these kinds of things are communicated between the lines when we talk and interact. How we say things is just as what we say in terms of communicating who we are.

I'm very unsure of what conclusions. I feel like I know a lot about her but I'm not sure if I have any clues to who she actually is in as a person. I mean, I have an impression but I also have absolutely zero faith that it is at all accurate.

Posted on October 16, 2013 at 2:55 pm 12

On What I Learned From Reading The Economist

@harebell Yes! We are women (and men) that do read the Economist and like space and also home repair and also personal stories and also weird jokes. I mean, there is a lively conversation about LBJ being awesome and Yuri Gagarin being hot up above.

Posted on October 1, 2013 at 10:40 am 7

On What I Learned From Reading The Economist

@Mira No. Nothing is duller than confusing self-deprecation for wit or charm or elevating the facile to the normative.

Posted on September 30, 2013 at 6:18 pm 12

On What I Learned From Reading The Economist

@karenb I used to be addicted to reading the Economist and I admit to having these kinds of thoughts from time to time. My favorite thing used to be laughing at the recruitment ads for the CIA Foreign Services. An ad. In a British publication. For American spies. Too good.

That said, I cringe at phrases like "become smart." Yeesh. Why not just say, "in a futile attempt to catch up on international news?"

Posted on September 30, 2013 at 4:18 pm 3