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By Jinxie on My Valiant Battle Against a Loud Co-Co-Worker, Part I

@discombobulated I'd stand up on my desk to cheer and clap, except that would annoy the crap out of my coworkers.

Posted on November 15, 2013 at 12:25 pm 2

By yeah-elle on My Valiant Battle Against a Loud Co-Co-Worker, Part I

oh man, good on you. this guy sounds insufferable. i look forward to part 45, in which norman finally shuts the fuck up.

how much do you bet that he's in the co-working space in the first place because he tried to work from home and some long-suffering person (wife, partner, child, room-mate, whatever) was like, LEAVE OR I AM CUTTING OFF MY EARS.

Posted on November 14, 2013 at 6:25 pm 13

By Redheads have even more fun on My Valiant Battle Against a Loud Co-Co-Worker, Part I

I had a total asshole of a boss that not only loved the speakerphone, would scream into it. You could hear him down the hall. Same with cell phones. Fairly certain the technology is good enough that you don't have to scream into the device two inches from your mouth.

But Norman is indeed an asshole. Who jumps up and down like a child in the middle of an adult conversation? And at work? Is there an HR person to talk (nicely and quietly :) ) to?

Posted on November 14, 2013 at 5:28 pm 5

By discombobulated on My Valiant Battle Against a Loud Co-Co-Worker, Part I

I think it's safe to say that everyone who has ever had to share office space with other humans is rooting for you.

Posted on November 14, 2013 at 5:22 pm 17

By elizeh doolittle on My Valiant Battle Against a Loud Co-Co-Worker, Part I

Sounds like Norman might need to get his hearing checked. Or he's an asshole. Or he's an asshole who also needs to get his hearing checked.

Posted on November 14, 2013 at 5:21 pm 5

By BattyRabbit on How I Found Out I Didn't Have the Herpes I'd Been Living With for Four Years

A similar experience happened to me this summer, except with genital warts. Quick diagnosis during a pelvic exam, no treatment or follow-up for 3 months because I lost health insurance, when I went back to the doctor I had no symptoms so they told me they might have been wrong. There's no way to tell, and I don't know what to tell people (though I disclosed to the person I'm seeing now because, like you with your boo, I *like* him. )

It was a very emotional and formative experience for me, and I really wanted to write something about it. I think this piece is 10,000x better than anything I could have come up with, and did everything for me that I hoped my imaginary writing would do. I thank you so much for writing it. I am going to share it everywhere.

Posted on November 13, 2013 at 7:26 pm 2

By emsiela on How I Found Out I Didn't Have the Herpes I'd Been Living With for Four Years

Yaaaaaay thank you for this! I mostly figured it out on my own, but in years of research this is the clearest article I have ever come across on gentical HSV-1. And way better info than any doctor ever gave me :( Oh, and moreover, in my pyschology of human sexuality class several years ago, the (new) prof got his facts on this wrong in front of about 200 students but I was too shy to call him out. Hopefully one day the stigma dies down and the facts become better known.

Posted on November 13, 2013 at 7:04 pm 2

By mollpants on 30 Minutes with Christina Angela

@LunaLunaLunaMoth @LunaLunaLunaMoth I don't have a problem with her English at all. That's not what I'm saying. What I have a problem with is the author's choice to portray this woman's thoughts through his own lens and his own perspective, without bringing in a third party to try and bridge the language gap to gain a deeper understanding of what Christina/Angela is saying on a more nuanced level, and/or by writing out the "pidgin" version of their conversation. (In an English-language written piece, especially a narrative like this one, the person "speaking" in broken English is inevitably going to come out sounding like the less eloquent/intelligent speaker.)

I work at an organization that deals pretty heavily with human trafficking/sex trafficking, and I spend a lot of my time handling media portrayals and cultural biases surrounding trafficked women, sex workers, and the gray areas in between these two extremes. It's true that women like Christina/Angela don't tend to write essays for the Hairpin - but that's all the more reason to give them appropriate platforms for when their voices do make it onto sites like these. Sex workers and prostitutes are used way too often as navel-gazing devices for essay writers and society at large - we really don't need another piece that uses them as literary metaphors to make a point.

For what it's worth, I really did think the prose was lovely, their interaction at the end was nice, and if this was done just a little bit differently I would be a lot more comfortable.

Posted on November 11, 2013 at 9:19 pm 13

By j-i-a on 30 Minutes with Christina Angela

@Susanna I'm hearing you guys on these comments, for what it's worth, and am hoping to do an interview with a camgirl as another perspective on sex work soon.

Posted on November 11, 2013 at 8:03 pm 6

By Susanna on 30 Minutes with Christina Angela

@Lipstick4all No Matt, not blinded by the desire to trash. Just uncomfortable with the pidgin, the descriptions of her body and the tourism feel.

Posted on November 11, 2013 at 7:41 pm 5