Quantcast
Jodi

Jodi

Eating my way around the world, one country at a time. World traveler, marshmallow enthusiast, writer & former lawyer, originally from Montreal.

On Talking to Kelly Lewis, Professional Solo Female Traveler

@abunnyfish @kulojam @bowtiesarecool I've been travelling for 6 years or so, and chatted to a lot of other travellers (many solo like me) about this. For the most part, people were uber-frugal for years and like me saved up. I had the benefit of a higher paying job (lawyering) even in an expensive city (NY) but it still enabled me to squirrel away. I've aggregated a ton of budgets for round-the-world trips / specific destinations on my site, and it seems on average people spend about $10,000-15,000 / year for a round-the-world, focusing primarily on cheaper places like Southeast Asia / South America / the Subcontinent. This is continuous travel, though.

I'd add too that many people I meet are doing what I did, which is start by traveling then realizing holy shit I love this learning by doing and sharing thing, and then trying to figure out a way to leverage pre-existing skills to build a business while still doing the moving around. For me that meant first doing freelance writing/social media work, while staying longer in each place. Now it means taking a site that somehow (yay thank you readers!) became more popular than I ever expected, and then listening to what they wanted. Which was to be fed. So now I'm feeding my readers who come through Saigon (where I decided to base myself this winter).

Ultimately I think there's a few different silos: the travellers who are perpetually on the move, those that want to dig and dig about places so they take longer/stay as mini-expat stints, and those who fall for a place and stay there all year round. I started out in the first group and moved to the second, but I wouldn't be able to support my lifestyle were I still moving as much as I used to.

If you're looking for specific opportunities, Escape the City often posts travel-related ones, and Kiva.org fellowships are another option. Fwiw, my budget is about $700 a month all in (rent, food -- lots of food, occasional drinks, laundry, etc) in Saigon. Can share other budgets too if needed! I know the question was a general one but if I can help with anything please let me know.

Posted on January 15, 2014 at 6:28 am 0

On Eating Good Cheap Food

@MScott-Photography Hope you enjoy the book!

Posted on December 19, 2012 at 12:46 pm 0

On Eating Good Cheap Food

@Leah Feinman@facebook Great to hear! It's also a really fun way to show your kids a whole set of insights about the local culture, just by watching the chaos and routines at the street level. Really enjoyed explaining to friends' kids where the metal carts were kept at night and what markets the food came from, etc. It's a hands-on learning experience :) Safe trip!

Posted on December 19, 2012 at 12:46 pm 0

On Eating Good Cheap Food

@notfromvenus Glad it's of help! Another option is Happy Cow and they've got a whole section on vegetarian restaurants in S. Korea - http://www.happycow.net/asia/south_korea/

Posted on December 12, 2012 at 10:34 pm 0

On Eating Good Cheap Food

@Diana It's very different depending on the region, but I agree - delicious! If you like Burmese food, pick up Naomi Duguid's new book, Rivers of Flavor - she's done a wonderful job of not only providing terrific recipes but also going into the regional differences and anthropology behind the foods people eat in country. She's been going to Burma since the 1980s & her book just came out this fall --http://www.amazon.com/Burma-Rivers-Flavor-Naomi-Duguid/dp/1579654134

Posted on December 12, 2012 at 10:33 pm 0

On Eating Good Cheap Food

@RK Fire So so good. :)

Posted on December 12, 2012 at 10:40 am 1

On Eating Good Cheap Food

@lindsey@twitter Thank you! Hipmunk is good fun, and a great team to work with. The best part about that book was reading it on the NY subway on the way to work. So many weird looks.

Posted on December 12, 2012 at 10:38 am 0

On Eating Good Cheap Food

@Panda+Attack So glad to hear! People ask why I included a whole chapter on allergies/eating restrictions in the book and it's because it really is so daunting, and so much harder to get comfortable on the road. Many safe travels to you!

Posted on December 12, 2012 at 10:34 am 0

On Eating Good Cheap Food

@RK Fire This evening!! I had it this evening and even better, it was because of the 'Pin - another reader saw this post and then wrote to say "another visitor who loves street food, woohoo!" and then took me with her friends for banh xeo. Yay! So wonderful :) Photo here: http://instagram.com/p/TI60-zOI-e/

Posted on December 12, 2012 at 10:33 am 1

On Eating Good Cheap Food

@janejanejane I usually bring handy-wipes or a lemon slice (often served at the table) to wipe 'em down instead, though I do carry portable chopsticks as well, but less for gluten-contamination and more for the rare times the street stall's cutlery looks a bit ... worrisome ;) Hong Kong is great but it's got a lot of soy-sauce and of course wheat flour dim sum options are out. However! Here's a great gluten-free guide to the city, and quite recent too - http://sassyhongkong.com/gluten-free-guide-to-hong-kong/

Posted on December 11, 2012 at 11:49 pm 0