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On Internet Work and Invisible Labor: An Interview With Danielle Henderson

Once again, I hope you are planning on talking to some people who do the truly invisible labor that I mentioned last time I posted in response to your series. I'll repeat my post below.

Academia is pretty privileged, and I appreciate Danielle's admission of this.. I mean, when I was in grad school I was really fucking happy to get my tuition paid PLUS a stipend for teaching a class, which allowed me to focus on my work. Right now, I am part of the invisible labor, cranking away banner ads and only able to take 1 class a quarter while working full time to support myself and my kid, attempting to learn some relevant skills in UX because my MFA and adjunct teaching did not pay the bills required to be a single mom. So yeah, I understand her plight but I want to hear more about the people who are grinding out code who we never hear about but I work with everyday.

I was excited about this series when I read the title.. the idea invisible labor when it comes to the tech arena is fascinating to me, as I work in the field. But I tend to think of invisible labor as the stuff that is not as gratifying as content production. Content production is the fun part, it's the dream job, but admittedly is way underpaid. But I hope you touch upon the REALLY invisible labor- the stuff that does not have bylines, like user experience, coding, and systems that use massively crowd-sourced labor like the people who are paid 5 cents per task on Mechanical Turk or development outsourcing sites such as Odesk where you can hire a faceless developer for $50 to build your website, or the building on the Google campus where largely african american people do the truly invisible labor of scanning books, page by page, for minimum wage, or sites such as Fivrr where you can get a person from africa to dance around with a sign with your logo on it for $5. These are the tasks that are thankless, and pay very little-- this is what I think of when I think of invisible labor in tech.
http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2013/12/the-art-of-google-book-scan.html?utm_source=tny&utm_campaign=generalsocial&utm_medium=facebook

Posted on December 17, 2013 at 12:25 pm 4

On Internet Work and Invisible Labor: An Interview With NPR's Linda Holmes

I was excited about this series when I read the title.. the idea invisible labor when it comes to the tech arena is fascinating to me, as I work in the field. But I tend to think of invisible labor as the stuff that is not as gratifying as content production. Content production is the fun part, it's the dream job, but admittedly is way underpaid. But I hope you touch upon the REALLY invisible labor- the stuff that does not have bylines, like user experience, coding, and systems that use massively crowd-sourced labor like the people who are paid 5 cents per task on Mechanical Turk or development outsourcing sites such as Odesk where you can hire a faceless developer for $50 to build your website, or the building on the Google campus where largely african american people do the truly invisible labor of scanning books, page by page, for minimum wage, or sites such as Fivrr where you can get a person from africa to dance around with a sign with your logo on it for $5. These are the tasks that are thankless, and pay very little-- this is what I think of when I think of invisible labor in tech.
http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2013/12/the-art-of-google-book-scan.html?utm_source=tny&utm_campaign=generalsocial&utm_medium=facebook

Posted on December 11, 2013 at 1:10 pm 2