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By happymisanthrope on Ghosts Of My Youth

@Gef the Talking Mongoose One of my favorite books, THINGS THAT GO BUMP IN THE NIGHT, a collection of upstate new york ghost stories from the 1950's, includes this passage:

"One American of Italian origin tells of a woodsman he knew who saw a ghost bulldog once, with the face and mustache of a friend of his who had recently been killed nearby."

But if you are at all interested in lots of quirky supernatural happenings, I can't recommend this book enough.

Posted on October 27, 2014 at 12:32 pm 1

By missedconnections on Ghosts Of My Youth

Not my story, but happened to a family friend... She had been widowed for a few years and was dating someone new, thinking about selling the house she and her deceased husband had lived in and moving in with the new guy. While she was in the office one night, she heard the printer turn on and one sheet of paper came rolling out with a tiny heart printed in the corner. She believes it was him saying that it was okay for her to move forward.

Posted on October 23, 2014 at 4:40 pm 2

By Allis Markham@facebook on I Mounted a Fox: An Interview with Allis Markham

@Mackenzie Kelly@facebook Hello-- I saw your comment and wanted to tell you about freeze-drying. I swear, i'm not stalking this thread! I was just showing a friend the post and saw there were comments. Anyhoo, freeze-drying: Have you ever had Astronaut Ice Cream (it's delicious!) or freeze-dried fruit? Well, if you can eat something freeze-dried, so can pests. Freeze-drying removes all moisture from the specimen and is a quick way of 'preserving' them, but in now way makes up for the removal of all fat, flesh, muscle and then the tanning of the skin. In a perfect, temperature controlled, low-light condition it would work fine for a time and can certainly give you quick results, however any re-introduction of moisture or exposure to pests and you can kiss your piece of taxidermy goodbye. Over time (and this is how we have to look at it at the museum) the specimen is at risk. I know there are taxidermists out there using this technique but I'm guessing they're using it mostly for small pieces that they can transfer to a freezer or treat quickly should a pest situation pop up. I did look into this technique a bit in the past, but ultimately felt that I wanted to stick with more manual, but long-term techniques. I hope this answers some questions and thanks for reading :)

Posted on September 11, 2014 at 11:07 pm 2

By ohbladi on A Song of Spice and Fire

If this piece is indicative of what the next era of The Hairpin is going to be like then THAT IS AMAZING.

Posted on September 11, 2014 at 2:29 pm 2

By LilyB on I Mounted a Fox: An Interview with Allis Markham

I will probably never, ever do or buy taxidermy, but my life is ever so slightly richer for having read this conversation with someone who does. Thanks.

Posted on September 11, 2014 at 12:13 pm 2

By frigwiggin on A Song of Spice and Fire

I hear that apple cider donuts have this same effect.

Posted on September 10, 2014 at 5:22 pm 1

By Jazmine on The White Beauty Myth

@idrathernot no bullshit around these parts

Posted on September 9, 2014 at 4:51 pm 5

By idrathernot on The White Beauty Myth

(Thanks for getting rid of that awful racism-denial comment! Much appreciated, eds.)

Posted on September 9, 2014 at 2:30 pm 3

By Jolie Kerr on Please Welcome Haley Mlotek

@frigwiggin There is almost no reference I love more than one to the swallows at Capistrano.

Posted on August 15, 2014 at 1:18 pm 2

By frigwiggin on Please Welcome Haley Mlotek

I haven't skulked around these parts in many a day, but I think I shall return again, like the swallows to Capistrano. Welcome, Haley!

Posted on August 15, 2014 at 1:05 pm 4