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On How Gel Nail Polish Changed Manicures

I'm really disturbed at how the post itself does not talk about the biggest problem with gel nails, and at how only few people in the comments are talking about it: the UV light! I used to buy UV lights at work, and we went out of our way to shield every single one of the UV machines so hands never go anywhere near the lights and no one ever looks at the UV light directly. And this is for pretty weak UV lights. Please folks, blasting your hands constantly with a known carcinogen to look pretty, it's just not worth it.

Posted on February 21, 2012 at 2:14 pm 3

On Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Destruction of Fatty Arbuckle

@snarkypants I did not know that! But I know Stan Laurel's cameraman used special film that showed Laurel's blue eyes better. Arbuckle's cameraman was Elgin Lessley, who was Buster Keaton's favorite cameraman until he was poached by Harold Lloyd. Buster Keaton attributes the concept behind Sherlock Jr. to Elgin Lessley, and ask especially for him to film the last silent he directed, The Cameraman.

Posted on February 14, 2012 at 1:34 am 0

On Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Destruction of Fatty Arbuckle

@Valley Girl That's the greatest injustice regarding this affair today. Some people have a vague inkling that Roscoe Arbuckle was involved in a scandal, but many don't know that he had been beyond exonerated. The jury of his third trial was so outraged at the injustice that Roscoe endured that they actually wrote him a letter of apology, for having to put up with not one, but three ridiculous trials.

Posted on February 8, 2012 at 5:51 pm 3

On Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Destruction of Fatty Arbuckle

@DMcK Well he was strong! Buster said he was all muscle underneath that soft appearnce.

Posted on February 8, 2012 at 5:13 pm 2

On Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Destruction of Fatty Arbuckle

@DMcK Yes! That's what I immediately thought when I read this one. Mabel Normand is the ultimate SoCH. Sex, drugs, murder, her story's got it all.

Posted on February 8, 2012 at 5:11 pm 0

On Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Destruction of Fatty Arbuckle

Though I don't know if I agree with the theory that Roscoe Arbuckle's ambiguous sexual image had to do with his downfall. Wearing dressing and impersonating females was really par for the course in silent era comedy. Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd, all did that. And none of the silent era comedians projected a hypermasculine type of image. I think what made people more ill at ease was how much less innocent these comedians were off camera than before the camera. I think even today, someone who just knows the Big Three based upon their movies would be shocked at how many women they were sleeping with, generally while they were already married. Harold Lloyd was luck in keeping his private life well out of the spotlight, but both Chaplin and Keaton were embroiled in sexual scandals, and like with Arbuckle, I think the problem was not so much what they presented on screen, but the extent to which that image differed from their off-screen lives.

Posted on February 8, 2012 at 5:10 pm 3

On Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Destruction of Fatty Arbuckle

I've been a huuuge fan of the SoCH series, but this story, as a big silent comedy fan, just struck me so much I was compelled to finally sign up for an account to comment! Spot on with the social context in which this scandal took hold and metasized. What really struck me when I read more and more about the silent era is how actors back then tended to be regarded as disreputable and morally suspect, because the film industry attracted the type of people (immigrants, Jews, poor, uneducated) who would have had difficulty advancing in polite society. And yet at the same time these people were admired and emulated by their fans. This tension between fascination and repulsion really fueled the big scandals of the era (the Arbuckle trials, the murder of Desmond Taylor, Chaplin's divorce from his second wife).

But there is a bright side to this entire sordid tale. The people in the film industry, shunned by polite society, were extraordinarily close to each other, to an extent unimaginable today. During the scandal Roscoe's many friends closed ranks around him and shielded and helped him as much as they could. Both Chaplin and Keaton considered being Roscoe's character witnesses, at the risk of destroying their own careers; Keaton was only talked out of it when people pointed out that if he destroyed his career his cast and crew would have no work either. Buster wound up handing over 25% of the money he made from his own movies to Roscoe for as long as he had his own production company. His friends helped him with getting directing jobs under the pseudonym Will B. Goode, supported him when he started business ventures away from the spotlight. Buster Keaton had always emphasized that the things one must remember about the story is that Roscoe is innocent, and his friends stuck by him no matter what happened.

Posted on February 8, 2012 at 4:58 pm 11

On Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Destruction of Fatty Arbuckle

@SarahP At the time of the scandal, Roscoe Arbuckle had been estranged but friendly with his first wife Minta Durfee for years. He was more or less living as a single man during that time. During the scandal, Minta Durfee, to her everlasting credit, came to his defense. They divorced after the scandal blew over, and Roscoe married two more times before his untimely death.

Posted on February 8, 2012 at 4:42 pm 5

On Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Destruction of Fatty Arbuckle

@tortietabbie Early cinema film was not panchromatic, which meant not all colors registered equally well. Roscoe had pale blue eyes, and blue shows poorly in those kind of film. Also early film was not very sensitive, so very powerful lighting was used for movies, which tends to wash details out, hence the profusion of guyliner. The silent era had more guyliner going on than a Cures concert.

Posted on February 8, 2012 at 4:40 pm 5

On Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Destruction of Fatty Arbuckle

@LDiggitty The publicity folks really played up his weight, calling him things like the Prince of Whales and insisted he was over 300lbs. At that time he was actually more like 280lbs. He got much thinner in the aftermath of this scandal because of stress and general misery.

Posted on February 8, 2012 at 4:37 pm 1