Posts Tagged: interviews
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A Sisterly Energy: Interview With Chairlift's Caroline Polachek

Caroline Polachek has the kind of siren-enchantress vocals that would haul Odysseus off his game. She’s already known as half of the duo behind Chairlift, her band with Patrick Wemberly, and has collaborated with Dolorean and Blood Orange’s Dev Hynes, as well as Washed Out and the now-defunct Das Racist. She also recently made a contribution to the record of an up-and-coming singer named Beyoncé.

And in April of this year, Polachek set out on her own and released a solo project under the name Ramona Lisa. Using solely her voice and her computer, she recorded snippets in transitional spaces (airports, hotels) while on tour, [...]

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"Men are a simmering heap of raw nerves and unexplored emotions"

"Men are remarkably open with me about their bodily insecurities. I'm not sure whether it's the anonymous format or the novelty of the outlet or the anti body-shaming ethos of the site, but men will write me paragraphs about how much they hate their hairy chests, or their circumcised foreskins, or the entire package that they're working with. Often men will tell me that my site helped them to surmount their insecurities, which warms my heart.

"I've come to the conclusion that men face similar (although less intense) pressures to look a certain way, but they are afforded fewer outlets to discuss how it affects them. Traditional masculinity requires men [...]

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What’s Essential: A Conversation with Nona Willis Aronowitz About Her Late Mother’s Work

Ellen Willis was born in 1941 in the Bronx, grew up in a middle-class family, and, for a while, did what was expected of her: she married “a nice Jewish boy from Columbia while majoring in English at Barnard,” writes her daughter, journalist Nona Willis Aronowitz, in her introduction to her late mother’s recently published compendium of essays, The Essential Ellen Willis. At 24, though, Willis divorced her husband, got an apartment in the East Village, and started writing about rock, politics, culture, feminism, and sex. She went on to become the first rock critic for The New Yorker, an editor and columnist at the Village [...]

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Jane Talks to the Marrieds

Our beloved Jane Marie is going to be talking to married couples every week at Cosmo, and her first chat is with Lindsey and Erin:

Can you tell me the main difference between being in a dating relationship and being married?

Lindsey: Married is better. Erin: Dating sucks! Lindsey: I think when you're dating, you're protecting yourself the whole time. Erin: Or less invested in some way… Lindsey: But if you've found someone who can actually commit to you, like, “We're gonna make this work, come hell or high water,” then I don't have to protect myself. I'm not holding back like I did when I was dating.

[...]
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Difficult Woman: A Conversation with Julie Klausner

Just like Broad City depicts an unprecedented relationship between underemployed, post-grad twenty-something women, Amy Poehler’s latest producing venture, Difficult People, will portray a new spin on friends in their thirties whose lives turned out different than expected.

The premise behind Difficult People comes from Julie Klausner, who may be best known for her weekly podcast, “How Was Your Week?,” in which she’s interviewed with the likes of Julianne Moore, David Sedaris and Kathleen Hanna. She’s the author of two books, an Upright Citizens Brigade alumna, and has worked on TV series such as Mulaney and her friend Billy Eichner’s hilariously unorthodox game show Billy on the Street. [...]

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"Relationships Are What I Spend Most Of My Time Thinking About": An Interview with Emma Straub

Brooklyn literary darling Emma Straub’s third book and second novel, The Vacationers, couldn’t be more different than her debut historical novel, Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures. Set in the present day, The Vacationers (available tomorrow, May 29th) spans two weeks of a nuclear New York City family’s vacation in Mallorca, Spain. The Post family, which consists of food enthusiast wife Franny, recently fired husband Jim, and adult children Sylvia and Bobby, set off for sun and relaxation before Sylvia heads off to college. But as with all adorably dysfunctional families, the Posts encounter a lot more than just what’s on their vacation itinerary, particularly about one another.

I emailed with [...]

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"To Survive in Women’s Sports, You Need to Be Somewhat Closeted": An Interview With Kate Fagan

From 1999 to 2004, Kate Fagan played Division I basketball for the nationally-ranked University of Colorado Buffaloes. She's now a reporter for ESPN. Her book, The Reappearing Act, out this week, chronicles her two-year coming-out process at Colorado, when she was a starting guard and a member of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes.

Your book covers a lot of ground. Can you break it down for anyone not familiar with your story?

It’s really a coming-of-age tale. It has the backdrop of big-time sports, Christianity, and sexuality as well. It’s about a two-year period in my life when I'm participating in the Fellowship for Christian Athletes and going [...]

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"It’s OK to Be a Bit Sassy": An Interview with Jenny Slate

Back in January, Obvious Child premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, where it was immediately called one of the best films of the fest (it was). The film’s star, Jenny Slate, was also hailed as the newest, freshest rom-com star in years (she is). It was also called an “abortion comedy” and a “comedy about abortion,” which it sort of is, but it’s also much more than that. It’s about Donna, a 20-something struggling standup comic in New York who is dealing with a terrible breakup, an empty bank account, and—as if things weren’t rough enough—an unplanned pregnancy after a one-night stand. It all sounds very serious, but [...]

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"A Certain Type of Male Thinking": An Interview with Adelle Waldman

On a Monday afternoon in May, Adelle Waldman is drinking an S. Pellegrino at a coffee shop on the south side of Fort Greene Park, wearing pronounced Warby Parker glasses, shifting a lot in her seat, nervously cutting herself off, pausing to think about what she’s just said, jumping through topics. The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P., her debut novel, came out in paperback on May 6, and tonight, Warby Parker is throwing a party to celebrate its release. On the day the book came out in paperback, she also released New Year’s: Nathaniel P. as Seen Through the Eyes of His Friend Aurit, a Kindle Single whose title is [...]

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Tales of Post-Graduate Love, Turmoil, and Friendship: A Conversation with Jessica Pan and Rachel Kapelke-Dale

Graduates in Wonderland: The International Misadventures of Two (Almost) Adults is an epistolary memoir by Jessica Pan and Rachel Kapelke-Dale that’s out today. You may already know Jessica from The Hairpin; she writes the Baking from a Bygone Era column and often enlists Rachel when she embarks “on disgusting culinary adventures from the past," she says. The two friends and co-authors met at Brown. Before they graduated and Rachel headed to New York and Jessica to Beijing, they promised to stay in touch with honest, tell-it-like-it-is, regular emails to each other. Those emails, which they returned to years later after reuniting in London, became the basis for [...]