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People Trying to Write in Art

(After an unintended hiatus, the Stuff in Art series is back.) READ MORE

Consensual Comedy: An Interview with Comedian Heather Gold

Heather Gold is a comedian living in Oakland. She’s shared the stage with (among others) Patton Oswalt, Maria Bamford, Margaret Cho, Bill Irwin, and Judy Gold. She’s best known for her one-woman hit show “I Look Like an Egg, But I Identify as a Cookie”, an “interactive baking comedy” that’s made the rounds in Austin, New York, and most recently played to sold-out audiences in Berkeley. So far she’s baked over 50,000 cookies with audiences. READ MORE

Animals Not Good at Hiding

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Are Women People?

There’s nothing like a sunny Tuesday morning to lure you out of bed and into the closet where you keep your desktop. From there you dive into Project Gutenberg, which you plunder, full of matutinal enthusiasm, for things to put on your Kindle so that you can fulfill a longtime fantasy: reading with scones on the lake. (This, by the way, is *the* reason to get an e-reader — not the lake bit, but the sheer bounty, the gems you’ve never heard of on Project Gutenberg, which are yours, for free, and which will break you with gratitude.) READ MORE

The Golden Age of Dirty Talk

It would never occur to me to describe ears as “handsome volutes to the human capital.” That it did to Charles Lamb, who also called them “ingenious labyrinthine inlets” and “indispensable side-intelligencers,” says one thing about him and something else entirely about me, but it says something, too, about the linguistic environment where volutes to the human capital can thrive. Whether because of the Internet or some other mysterious, homogenizing influence, our language has lost some biodiversity. Even our obscenities—the parts of language least likely to lose their verve—have dwindled, and the survivors have dulled from overuse. “You've got balls,” we say, when once we could have yelled that “the testimonies of your Manhood are swell'd as big, Sirrah, as a couple of Norfolk dumplings!” Where we use mean hypotheticals, like "I would love to have the ability to make you sore," our ancestors promised each other nights spent “in prigging, wapping, and telling of drunken stories.” READ MORE

Breastfeeding in Art

Click on a painting to see its context.

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How to React to a Blemish in the 17th Century

Brought to you anonymously by the Academy of Pleasure in 1656. READ MORE

Joan Who Crawled Across London With a Candle Up Her Butt

A badass 17th century lady named Joan won a bet. READ MORE

Seventeenth-Century Preparation H

Dear Philiatros, READ MORE

Floors in Art

Click on a floor to see its context. READ MORE