Quantcast

Azealia Banks, "Heavy Metal And Reflective"

Many moons ago, Azealia Banks blessed us with "212"; three years later we don't yet have a debut album (and she dropped herself from her label), but we do have movement. Here's "Heavy Metal And Reflective," an extended, bouncy, guttural boast released by Azealia Banks Records. Elsewhere: "Video Girl," a new leak from FKA Twigs' forthcoming album, and Jenny Lewis' Newport Folk Festival set.

"You inherited a Caucasian nose. Your nose is nice."

As they traffic in all these modified body parts, even the most esteemed surgeons in the field can come across as almost blasphemously politically incorrect in casual conversation. (I had never thought Mongoloid was anything other than an insult until a black surgeon used it to praise a mouth, and even the term “ethnic plastic surgery” confuses most accepted distinctions between ethnicity, which is tied to culture and language, and race, which includes physical appearance.) These exchanges can be jarringly retro but also oddly refreshing—discussions of race with strangely post-racial specialists who choose to see beauty as something that can be built, à la carte, with features harvested from peoples all over the world. It feels like science fiction—but utopian or dystopian, I can’t decide.

The New York cover story this week is from our pal Maureen O'Connor, who checks in on the world of "ethnic plastic surgery" and is told, diagnostically, "You inherited a Caucasian nose. Your nose is nice. Your eyes have a little bit of Asian mixed in." [The Cut]

MNEK, "Wrote A Song About You"

MNEK, a 19-year-old singer-songwriter from the UK, continues to quietly challenge the new Sam Smith order. Here's the video for "Wrote A Song About You," which Kaytranada already flipped into understated techno. The video treatment is one-part Saved By The Bell, one-part "Rude Boy." READ MORE

"I’ve been booed in over 30 countries": The Ronda Rousey Story

Kelefa Sanneh profiles Ronda Rousey, the former Olympian judoka and currently star of the UFC's mixed martial arts circuit, in this week's New Yorker. The UFC's female division essentially exists because Rousey does; the 27-year-old has never lost and is known for a punishing, unique arm bar that she brought over from her judo training. She's both the sport's star and "heel" (her walk-up music in one match is Joan Jett's "Bad Reputation"), and no other woman can compete with her. "In order to keep the attention of a restless audience," Sanneh writes, "Rousey needs to find another Rousey": READ MORE

RIP, Elaine Stritch

Elaine Stritch, the famed actress and singer, died today at the age of 89. The clip above is her performing "The Ladies Who Lunch," from Company; this clip of her struggling to record the perfect take for the cast recording is worth watching, too. Shoot Me, a documentary about Stritch that came out last year and is available for streaming on Netflix now, includes this perfect anecdotal tribute from the late James Gandolfini: READ MORE

"This is not She-Thor."

"This is not She-Thor. This is not Lady Thor. This is not Thorita. This is Thor. This is the Thor of the Marvel Universe. But it's unlike any Thor we've ever seen before." READ MORE

"An obsessively determined woman willing to start on the bottom rung"

For ESPN, our pal Kate Fagan profiled Natalie Nakase, a former UCLA basketball player who hopes to become the first female coach in the NBA: READ MORE

Wet, "Move Me"

The latest from Wet, a Hairpin favorite, is "Move Me," a cut from DJ Kitty Cash's so-far stellar-sounding forthcoming mixtape, and it is "Say My Name" gone sultry and doe-eyed. Also check out "Moodring," SZA's cut from the album, here.

Elle Varner feat. A$AP Ferg, "Don't Wanna Dance"

You might recognize the first few seconds of this new Elle Varner track; it's The Jimmy Castor Bunch's "I Just Wanna Stop," which Kanye West sampled in "We Don't Care." As for all of the following seconds, they're excellent as well.

Rosie Perez On Her Do the Right Thing Dance Sequence

The weekend before last was the 25th anniversary of Spike Lee's classic Do the Right Thing, and Sarah Larson's New Yorker dispatch from the Brooklyn Academy of Music's celebration included this wonderful Rosie Perez reminiscence, on her iconic dance sequence in the film's opening credits: READ MORE