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Thursday, June 6, 2013

493

What Is a "Water Fountain"

This map is from a collection of over a hundred dialect surveys compiled by Joshua Katz, a PhD student in statistics at NC State University. My mom's family is from Rhode Island, and I thought I knew all of the Ocean State's pronunciation idiosyncrasies by now: I own a T-shirt that says "Speaking 'Rhode Island' Like a Native: Lesson #1," for example, with a cartoon of a woman holding a blender. An arrow pointing to the blender says "BLENDAH"; an arrow pointing to the woman says "BRENDER." Makes perfect sense. But "bubbler!" "Bubbler" I've never heard before.

More here.



493 Comments / Post A Comment

AnalogMetronome

The "y'all" map warmed the cockles of my heart. As much as I love living in Yankeeland, I miss the way people back down south talk.

AnalogMetronome

@AnalogMetronome Oh wait, that map isn't on the link that was up there. It's this one.

AnalogMetronome

@AnalogMetronome except for "the devil is beating his wife," what is that!

iceberg

@AnalogMetronome yayyyy these maps! thank you! (and I thought I was going to have to do actual work today pshaw.)

rien à dire

@AnalogMetronome I grew up hearing/saying that, and I'm a NY Yankee. Thank an Ozarkian mother....

olivebee

@AnalogMetronome The "ya'll" map was missing an option: "yinz." It's only Western PA/Pittsburgh, but that's still a lot of people. Or "yous" as in "yous guys," but that's a lot of the east coast.

alicke

@olivebee I was just coming here to complain about that! Yinz & youse...my rural PA highschool often had a handwritten sign up at lunch that read "Sunny D for youse". See also: "Can I get you something to drink awhile?"

noodge

@alicke

The omission of "youse" is a SERIOUS issue with these....

Rock and Roll Ken Doll

@olivebee
My favorite use of "yinz" was by a waitress in Altoona bringing us deep-fried cheddar cubes. Pitch perfect.

olivebee

@Rock and Roll Ken Doll I particularly love hearing a PBurgher say "yinz guys." ("Yinz guys want pop an'at?") Because, translated to normal speech, that means "You ones guys." Double plural nouns.

yunkstahn

@AnalogMetronome YES! YINZ!

EpWs

@AnalogMetronome You/y'all/all y'all

Except I'm a weird northern/southern transplant hybrid so I use y'all and you guys interchangeably. MAP ME NOW, DATA.

koala

@olivebee The original study by Bert Vaux (the linguist who collected all the data) does have yinz! Also you'uns, you lot, youse, etc. The statistician's algorithm is only including the top four answers. You can see a less pretty but more complete version of that map here: http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_50.html

saritasara

@The Everpresent Wordsnatcher Wonder if there's any research about the usage difference between y'all and "all y'all."
I mean, to me, they definitely carry different nuances, but I'd be hard pressed to explain the difference. I feel like it's not just a matter of "all y'all = more people"

ALSO--- a huge pet peeve of mine -- it is spelled Y'ALL, not YA'LL. That's how contractions work, people!
/*endrant

missupright

@olivebee I have never HEARD of "yinz", that's brilliant.

iceberg

Bubbler REPRESENT! That's what we call them in Australia. I don't know why, probably because the water bubbles up out of the thing?

JanieS

@iceberg BUBBLERS 4 LYFE! (Or 'bubblahs', as the Bostonians have it.)

iceberg

@JanieS well of course, bubblah! That's how I'll teach the BBs to say it!

grizzle_bees

@JanieS "Bubblah" is such a New England thing - specifically Eastern MA. When I went to college, I encountered people for the first time in my life who called it a "water fountain." Stupid.

I'm interested in what people call "the place where you buy alcohol." Here it's the "packey."

Emby

@shart_attack Just liquor store.

But I thought it was hilarious that some folks were scandalized by the concept of the drive-through liquor store. It's just convenient, people!

Bittersweet

@shart_attack In CT where I used to live it was the "packy store" and you had to make a "packy run" before the store closed at 8 PM. (Yep, crazy but true.) Here in Boston I've heard "packy" but also "liquor store."

In VA where I grew up, you can buy beer and wine at the grocery but for the hard stuff you have to go to the ABC.

badddrun

@iceberg In Wisconsin, which is the other place that bubbler is used, it's actually because Kohler, which is a Wisconsin company, made a water fountain that was actually named "The Bubbler" and it stuck. No idea why it happened that way elsewhere, though.

iceberg

@shart_attack In Australia it's the "bottle shop or "bottle-o" for short - here (in coastal GA) the correct name seems to be "package shop" but people tend to just say the name of the specific one they're going to.

Lily Rowan

@shart_attack Yeah, I think it's weird that there's not more green in eastern MA in that map! This is the tragedy of mobility. New people don't know.

Laura Grace@twitter

@shart_attack in the UK "the place where you buy alcohol" is the off-licence or 'offie' http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=offie&defid=1446131

alicia

@shart_attack Here in South Dakota it's just the liquor store. (But ever since my Detroit-native friend told me Michiganders call it a party store, I've begun jokingly referring to it as such. Party store!)

karenb

@shart_attack liquor store in Toronto, but often also "the beer store" or "the LCBO", which are the names of the actual stores.

JanieS

@shart_attack In SE Michigan, where I grew up, they're called 'party stores'. Never came across that anywhere else.

fondue with cheddar

@shart_attack @Bittersweet Please tell me it's called "packey" because they sell package goods.

JanieS

@fondue with cheddar Yeah, it's derived from 'package store'.

Roxanne Rholes

@fondue with cheddar On a 'pin thread long ago, I asked about this! I was afraid that saying "packy" in New England was racist. I was assured that it is not - in New England, it comes from "package store." However, according to the commenters from the UK, you should never say "packy" there, because it would be considered slang for Pakistani and would therefore be a racial slur about the stereotype that Middle Eastern people run convenience stores and liquor stores. (So now, just to be safe, I don't say "packy" at all. You never know who might be in earshot, I'm not in the business of hurting feelings, man.)

Faintly Macabre

@shart_attack In Pennsylvania, we sometimes call it the "state store," because all the damn liquor and wine stores are owned/run by the state. (And beer is only available by the bottle/six-pack in places that also sell food, or by the case at distributors.)

hallelujah

@JanieS Hey that's where I live!!!! And yes, we totally do call them party stores.

TheJacqueline

@Lily Rowan I grew up in Central MA and it was ALWAYS bubbler. We used to call ice cream sprinkles "jimmies" as well. Didn't realize jimmies means something else to most of the country until college...

Funny story. On my way to a graduation party in New Jersey, a couple friends called me and asked if I could pick up more beer. I said "sure", and then swung into the parking lot of the nearest package store I saw.

Only because it was in New Jersey, the package store actually sold packages.

JanieS

@hallelujah Where do you live? I grew up in Farmington Hills. Of course, a true party store must be an independent, family-run business, located in a strip mall next to either 1) a Papa Romano's or 2) a Hungry Howie's.

fondue with cheddar

@JanieS @Roxanne Rholes That's a relief, because I've only heard the UK interpretation of the word, so I totally would have thought that's what they meant if I heard it.

@Faintly Macabre I heard they're talking about getting rid of state stores?

maritimah

@karenb I call it the LCBO but pronounce it the "lick-bo". I don't think I'm the only one?

karenb

@maritimah for sure not the only one!

miss olsen

@iceberg A lot of older people in Maryland call it the county dispensary, which sounds charmingly old-fashioned (its hours are un-charmingly old-fashioned). Anybody else heard that one?

Michelle LeBlanc@twitter

@Lily Rowan Yeah, everyone I grew up with would definitely put a big spot of green right on central MA for all the bubblahs. Also yes, packies and jimmies. I've definitely subbed out sprinkles for jimmies as an adult, but I still call them packies here in NYC. Also I can't get down with Hoagies, they are subs.

Lastly, my family calls all soda "cold drinks" always plural as in "Can I get you some cold drinks?" That might just be a family thing though, I hadn't heard it much otherwise.

Lily Rowan

@Michelle LeBlanc@twitter My originally-from-Texas grandmother says "cold drink"! But it could also mean iced tea, I think, in addition to soda. I think it's because she would never serve liquor, and wouldn't want anyone to be confused if she offered "a drink."

hallelujah

@JanieS I AM IN FARMINGTON HILLS RIGHT NOW! It is the home of my terrible office! I just moved from Detroit to Redford.

Bittersweet

@TheJacqueline What are jimmies everywhere else? I'm in Boston and everyone orders his or her ice cream "with jimmies." Now I'm getting paranoid that I'm asking for, like, spooge on my dessert.

iceberg

@Bittersweet according to Tupac, your Jimmy is your penis, I think, because "you need a vest for your Jimmy in the city of sex".

Bittersweet

@iceberg "Yes, I'll have a small black raspberry on a sugar cone, with extra dicks, please."

TheJacqueline

@Bittersweet I think it's condoms everywhere else! (At least it is to my tri-state area peoples) But in Boston you are totally getting sprinkles.

adorable-eggplant

@iceberg Hence Jimmy Hat = Condom. Or just Jimmy for short (by like metonymy or something).

Cha dTuigim

@iceberg In Québec, people buy their alcohol mostly at dépanneurs (convenience stores), which is abbreviated (maybe only by English-speakers) to 'dep'. If you want hard liquor, though, you need to go to the SAQ (that's actually the name of the government agency which runs them, the Société des alcools du Québec), which is either spelled out or pronounced 'sack'.

excitedheart

@shart_attack Our liquor is just sold in regular grocery stores and convenience stores and maybe some pharmacies so this is so interesting to me. I have never heard anything other than liquor store!

grizzle_bees

@iceberg I have NEVER used the term "jimmies." I maybe heard that it was a racist term somehow (the chocolate sprinkles?) Also, never made the "packey"-"Paki" connection. Eep! We're not racists in New England, promise!

grizzle_bees

@Bittersweet mmmmmm. Black raspberry ice cream dicks

iceberg

@shart_attack they taste so much better than actual dicks. ahhh your comment made me laugh!

spurious

@hallelujah & @JanieS THIS IS SO WEIRD I'M ALSO FROM FARMINGTON HILLS.

Bittersweet

@shart_attack Interesting article here about the origins of the term "jimmies." Bottom line, a candy company in NH claims they named them after an employee named Jimmy, but the term was already around then. There is no evidence to suggest they have anything to do with racism.

missupright

@Bittersweet So "jimmies" are what English people call "hundreds and thousands"? Or are they only the chocolate kind of sprinkle?

Bittersweet

@missupright They are a bit different from hundreds and thousands, at least in shape. We call hundreds and thousands "non-pareils" which are round, where jimmies are sort of cylindrical. We have chocolate jimmies and rainbow jimmies (3-4 colors). I've never seen any other kind.

fondue with cheddar

@missupright I've heard people say one kind (chocolate or rainbow) is called sprinkles and the other jimmies, though I forget which is which. But to me they're all sprinkles. I may be in the minority where I live, which is the Philly area.

Also, my little brother was Jimmy and he hated that his name was also a word. There was a TV commercial for security windows where they showed a burglar trying to break in with a crowbar. The voiceover said, "They're virtually jimmy-proof!" which we all thought was hilarious but he would get really upset.

Queen of Pickles

@iceberg My mom called it "the beer and wine store", I think because she felt sheepish about having us kids wait in the car while she ran inside.

fondue with cheddar

@Cha dTuigim One would think only English speakers would say "dep," because if French speakers abbreviated it they would say, "dayp."

micheljhon

They're virtually jimmy-proof!" which we all thought was hilarious but he would get really upset.
21 Day Fix

maybe partying will help

Still not over "the devil is beating his wife." It's A SUNSHOWER YOU HEATHENS.

JanieS

@maybe partying will help I like 'foxes wedding' myself.

hallelujah

@maybe partying will help Yeah, what??? It is true though, as a Yankee, that we have no word for that. The first time it happened after I moved to South Carolina I was all WHAT IS THIS STRANGE HAPPENING IT'S A MIRACLE!

rangiferina

@JanieS foxes wedding! that's wonderful. my mom grew up calling it a 'monkey's wedding'.

pajamaralls

@maybe partying will help It's been the devil is beating his wife for my entire life. Never known any different.

What is a sunshower?

maybe partying will help

@JanieS

That IS cool. I might start calling it that, because evocative!

fondue with cheddar

@pajamaralls It's when it rains but it's sunny instead of cloudy.

fondue with cheddar

@hallelujah Here in NJ we call them "sunshowers."

The first time I ever saw one I was paddleboating on a lake by myself and it was GLORIOUS.

maybe partying will help

@pajamaralls

I had honestly never encountered that phrase and I am agog that it didn't come up in any of my linguistic anthro courses. WHERE DID IT COME FROM?? I must research.

Amphora

@fondue with cheddar There's a sun shower outside my window right now.

fondue with cheddar

@Amphora HOORAY! It's too beautiful of a thing to be associated with spousal abuse.

pajamaralls

@maybe partying will help Likewise, I feel pretty confident that I've only heard the "sunshower" a couple times at the most. I was talking to my mom and cousin about it yesterday and it's one of those "we've always said it/only thing we've heard"

stonefruit

@rangiferina !!! I thought I was the only American who calls this a monkeys' wedding! Did your mom grow up in the U.S.?

I do know this is A Thing in Russian and in South African English, and I have never (NEVER, dear G-d) heard the thing about the devil and his wife.

rangiferina

@stonefruit nope, she grew up in India (in an Anglo-Indian community). I'd heard of it being a South African thing too, but not Russian - how cool!

stonefruit

@rangiferina OH I LOVE LANGUAGES! That is really, really rad.

pinniped

@stonefruit My mom taught us "it's a witch's wedding"!

Thunder was "God bowling."

EpWs

@maybe partying will help I've never heard a specific term for this, it's always "IT'S RAINING AND SUNNY OUT AGAIN" so I'm fascinated by all of these.

distrighema

@maybe partying will help I've always called it devil's rain, which I thought was reasonably common but I guess it didn't make the map.

yeah-elle

Despite being a California Bay Area native, I apparently say a bunch of stuff like a Southerner. Carra-mel and law-yer and pa-jaw-mas, duh.

martinipie

@yeah-elle Me too, weird! My father grew up in Louisiana (no accent anymore but maybe pronunciation stuck?) so that might be why, but I can't remember ever feeling like I pronounced things oddly compared to other people.

yeah-elle

@martinipie Yeah, neither of my parents are native English speakers and I've absorbed a few of their "off" speech habits, but that's usually placing emphasis on the wrong syllable (ie inVENtory instead of invenTORy). I've never noticed pronouncing things differently than most other people I encounter!

I'd consider that maybe the Bay Area is just a weird grab-bag of pronunciation idiosyncrasies, but then again, some things are very standard Western U.S. (drinking fountain, soda).

meetapossum

@yeah-elle I find that a lot of Southerners stress the the first syllable in 3-syllable words, and it always bothers me. (IN-sur-ance, UM-brell-a)

fondue with cheddar

@yeah-elle Is Carra-mel a Southern thing? People say it both ways here so I don't know what's "normal." But "car-ml" is a mountain!

We say soda in New Jersey too!

Amphora

@meetapossum And don't you pronounce "pecan" different depending on its place in a phrase? Butter pee-CAN ice cream or PEE-can pie?

meetapossum

@Amphora Yes, I do! Butter pecan and pecan pie are pronounced differently (as you demonstrated).

miss olsen

@meetapossum with the notable exception of thee-AY-ter

fondue with cheddar

@meetapossum My cousins in Indiana say "peekin' pie"! I always say pih-CAHN and probably sound like a tool.

TheLetterL

@fondue with cheddar I remember an episode of Paula Deen where she herself said there are at least four totally acceptable ways to pronounce pecan, so.

I do the place in the phrase difference, too! PEEcan pie and butter p'CAHN ice cream. Weird.

fondue with cheddar

@miss olsen I used to say that! But I stopped because I got tired of being teased in college.

fondue with cheddar

@TheLetterL Yeah, p'CAHN is probably a better way to spell it. If Paula Deen says they're all okay, they must be. ;)

koala

@yeah-elle A lot of California is Southern-influenced due to migration patterns, so not that weird!

Megasus

I don't know which I use!! Not bubbler though, never heard that one before.

karenb

being a canadian makes this extra fun, because i get to see where in the states i am most like. (also, care-a-mel and car-mel are different candies, yes? the first is inside chocolate, often soft, the second is free-standing and chewy.)

maybe partying will help

@karenb

you're blowing my mind.

Hot Doom

@karenb I never thought of it that way, but yes, sort of? Car-ml apples, car-ml corn...though, now that I think about it, I would say car-ml sauce too, and then maybe caramel in a candy bar that had the word pronounced 'car-a-mel' in the ad. So, actually, I have no idea.

martinipie

@karenb That is my understanding as well....maybe I just ate too much candy as a child.

karenb

@maybe partying will help i have a weirdo-blend of accents as a nova scotian who spent 4 years in NYC and now has lived in Toronto for 8 years, so i don't even know how i pronounce things anymore. i forget whether "scallop" has a long a or a short one. both, i guess.

fondue with cheddar

@karenb Car-a-mel is a candy, or anything made with said candy. Car-mel is a mountain.

maybe partying will help

@fondue with cheddar

Yeah! Carmel by the sea, caramel in my mouth.

karenb

@fondue with cheddar is the emphasis the same on Carmel the mountain as it would be in "car-mel" the candy? I've got it on carMEL the mountain and CARmel (which is more like CARmuhl anyway) in my head.

fondue with cheddar

@maybe partying will help Yes, please!

@karenb For caramel, it's primary stress on the CA, secondary stress on the MEL. I thought people pronounced the mountain CARmel but I could be wrong as I'm not sure if I've ever heard it spoken.

maritimah

@karenb I'm so with you on "scallop"! I always just say the word twice each time I say it, once each way! I'm a New Brunswicker who lived in BC for 4 years and Toronto for the past 7.

karenb

@fondue with cheddar i don't think i have, either.

karenb

@maritimah they're scallop-scawllops, for sure.

crookedlegs

@karenb Lifelong Haligonian - just tried saying "scaw-llop" and felt wrong. I think I mostly say/hear "scah-llop" around here.

playingpossum

@karenb If we are talking about the seafood then we (in Eastern Australia) say skol-lop.
Also BUBBLER!!! What else would you call it? Water bubbles from it! And a fountain is a great big thing in a park!! Took me right back to primary school.
I love words!

cashmere velvet candy cane

"I ___ her lifeless body from the pool" ????!!

cashmere velvet candy cane

@cashmere velvet candy cane Also I'm from the south and I've never heard anyone refer to all soda as coke. Everyone says soda.

martinipie

@cashmere velvet candy cane Yeah I feel like that is some kind of linguistics urban legend. No one I know from anywhere says that

Emby

@cashmere velvet candy cane Depending on where you draw your borders for the South, this might count: I have a lot of family in Houston and thereabouts, and it's definitely "coke" for all soda.

coolallison

@cashmere velvet candy cane I have lived in Texas my entire life and I feel like I am the only person who says "soda." And that is only because I made a conscious effort to stop calling everything "coke."

frigwiggin

@cashmere velvet candy cane

Back in high school I had an internet friend from Florida and we definitely had at least one argument because she claimed "coke" could be used to refer to all soda.

maybe partying will help

@frigwiggin

What part of FL was she from? I am guessing...north FL?

frigwiggin

@maybe partying will help

I don't remember! Which is sad because we exchanged letters at least one time. Heck if I know anything about Florida, though.

cashmere velvet candy cane

@Emby Interesting! I'm from TN and according to the map we should all be saying coke but this is definitely not a TN thing whatsoever. I'm actually pretty sure you'd get made fun of if you called all soda coke here.

beecaveroad

@martinipie no it's totally a thing! I'm from the Dallas area and I definitely have to make a conscious effort to say soda. "What kind of coke do you want?" "Sprite" was a totally normal exchange to have when I was growing up.

iceberg

@margaret_r as an aside, in Australia we call all Sprite-flavor soda lemonade, and we don't really even have the drink that USAmericans call lemonade.

Emby

@iceberg Odd odd odd odd odd odd odd odd.

iceberg

@Emby Odder than not even having a word for the flavor so you have to use a brand name??? I think not.

coolallison

@margaret_r ARE WE THE SAME PERSON?!

frigwiggin

@iceberg I was just reading last night about how they call lemon-lime soda "lemonade" in the UK too! And how US tank tops are "vests" and US sweatervests are "tank tops." Madness.

la berry

@cashmere velvet candy cane WOMP! my family is from Memphis and we definitely call all soda coke. Our exchanges were pretty much exactly like margaret_r.

beecaveroad

@coolallison I don't think so??? But apparently we are accent/dialect twins. Orrr just both grew up in Texas.

iceberg

@frigwiggin In Australia tank tops are singlets. used also for the ones you might call "undershirts" or "wifebeaters"

stuffisthings

IIRC, the original soda vs. pop vs. coke map, which was done by county, showed a bubble of "Coke" only around Atlanta (which makes sense)

itiresias

@cashmere velvet candy cane wait, disagree! my best friend in college was from nashville and she made this argument about coke, and we were all like "HAHAHAHA THE SOUTH IS SO DUMB"

annejumps@twitter

@cashmere velvet candy cane Me neither. It's always used as some "huh huh aren't Southerners dumb" thing but I've never heard anyone refer to any and all sodas as Coke. I'm in Atlanta.

ETA: Ha, see above. :-P

chunk lite

@cashmere velvet candy cane Really? I am from Mobile, AL and it was only once I moved all the way up north to NC that I stopped saying "coke" for all sodas b/c I got teased for it.

playingpossum

@iceberg And we would never say "soda" unless we meant just soda water. "soda" for soft drink gives you away as American.

beecaveroad

My personal favorite is the Bowie knife one. Texas history was useful for something!

coolallison

@margaret_r I know! As a Texas native, I was astounded to see that the rest of the country pronounces it differently. I didn't even know that was up for discussion.

stuffisthings

@margaret_r I thought it was used for fending off British space rockers?

RK Fire

@coolallison As a Maryland native, I was also surprised at this.

BOOOOOOOOO-wie!

angermonkey

@coolallison The original piece apparently didn't make the Jim Bowie/Bowie knife connection and seemed flummoxed that only Texas and DC used "Boo-wie." DUDE'S NAME IS BOO-WIE. IT IS A BOO-WIE KNIFE, Y'ALL!

This is like the angst caused by someone being wrong on the internet but like times A THOUSAND. It's going to take me so long to drive around and correct the rest of the country...

RK Fire

@angermonkey Also, it's not really "DC" so much as it is Maryland! THERE'S A DIFFERENCE

angermonkey

@RK Fire True, I apologize. Maryland shall be spared in my cross-country road trip to explain to the masses that they are pronouncing Bowie Knife incorrectly and to mend their ways.

RebeccaKW

@angermonkey As a Texas native, we know there is a David Bow-ee and a Jim Boo-wee. But there was a transplant in one of my college classes and she was giving a report on Bow-ee Lake in Mont-a-gyu (Montague) County. We were all looking at each other, wondering what was happening. What, no, it's Boo-wee and Mont-ayg County.

Emby

The one I was hoping to see, but wasn't on there, was whether you use a definite article in front of the name of an interstate or highway. E.g., in Arizona and parts of California, it's the I-10. Out east, I've learned it's just 95. As far as I can tell, it's just AZ and CA that do it, but I'm curious if other places do, too.

martinipie

@Emby Eh, I think it is subtler and more complex than that. No one I know says "the 101," but we do say "the 5" or "the 1" here in the Bay Area. No one says "the I-5."

frigwiggin

@Emby As a central Californian, I don't usually use the definite article for that ("so you get on 99" or "I'm still on 5, headed home"), but I think I've heard other folks use it.

Emby

@martinipie We have a 101 in Phoenix, and it's definitely "the 101".

martinipie

@Emby Weird, hearing that makes me feel like I hit my funnybone. Language, y u so cool!

AnalogMetronome

@Emby North Carolina and Boston, no definite article. It's just "I-40" or "95."

karenb

@Emby in toronto, it's 'the 407' and 'the gardiner' and 'the DVP'.

maybe partying will help

@Emby

Hmm. In (my part of) FL there's no "the"... we say "I-4" but also just plain "95." For some reason I think it's a syllabic thing? Like it feels better to give the "4" an extra syllable? I would say "275" or "528" but I wouldn't say "10" or "4."

yeah I don't know.

Heat Signature

@Emby Up here in Maine, we call it "THE Maine Turnpike", or "The Turnpike", but once it stops becoming "The Turnpike" it turns into "I 95".

Hot Doom

@martinipie I'm an LA person, and we definitely say "the 101", along with "the 5", etc. I think the only other instance when it sounds natural not to use 'the' is when people replace it with "Highway" or "Interstate".

nic'kalmus@twitter

@Emby In my case it seems generational. Everyone in my generation says just "290" or "90-94" or "55" (these are Chicago hwys) but a lot of older folks say "the Eisenhower" or "the Kennedy."

Emby

@Hot Doom I will never like your basketball team, but I stand in solidarity with you over the placement of definite articles before highways and freeways.

Emby

@nic'kalmus@twitter I should note that I'm more talking about when you use the number, not a nickname for it. I think most folks use a "the" before, like, "the Superstition Freeway"*, but it seems like a Southern California/Arizona thing to use it before a numbered interstate or highway, e.g., the 5, the 66, the 10, the 101.

*real freeway in Phoenix/Mesa!

Dancercise

@Emby
It's mostly southern CA that puts "the" in front of the freeway numbers. Northern Californians don't.

olivebee

@nic'kalmus@twitter Haha I was just about to say that in Chicago, I call everything by its number. I could not, for the life of me, tell you which one is the Dan Ryan, the Kennedy, etc. If you handed me a chart with two columns and you had to draw a line in between to match (like in elementary school), I'd be like "???" But I also only moved here 8 years ago. I think people who grew up here know the names.

Ophelia

@Emby Basically, that's how we on the East Coast tell when the writers for a show set in DC or NY haven't actually done their reasearch. If a character is driving on "the 95," then someone didn't edit that script. The only exception (as someone noted above re: Maine) is for turnpikes. The Maine Turnpike, the Mass Pike, the Jersey Turnpike, etc.

No Whammies

@Emby I've lived in AZ for about ten years and I still don't know the nicknames of the freeways- listening to traffic on the radio is useless for me. Is the Superstition the 60?

Emby

@No Whammies For part of it, yeah. The 60 heading out toward Apache Junction is the Superstition.

sophia_h

@martinipie I switch! When I visit friends in SoCal, I call it "the 5", but on my way back up north it becomes "5" again somewhere around Buttonwillow.

Amphora

@nic'kalmus@twitter Everyone I know says the Eisenhower/Kennedy/Dan Ryan regardless of age, unless they're explaining something to an out-of-towner.

steponitvelma

@Hot Doom Fellow southern Californian weighing in here. I definitely called it "the ___" but when I moved up north, first to norcal and then to Oregon, I started dropping the article. But if I'm talking about a socal freeway, I'm back to "the."

annejumps@twitter

@Emby It really will make you stand out here in Georgia if you say "the 85" or "the MARTA."

entangled

@Emby I've lived in the NY area, southern California and northern California and my highway terminology is all over the place. It's the five and always the ten and usually just 101. It's 80 or I80, 95 or I95 and The Merritt Parkway (NEVER 15) and the FDR is just the Fuck Dup Road.

MilesofMountains

@Emby In northwest Canada you don't even shorten the names, EVER. It's "Highway 16" or "the Yellowhead", no one will know what you're talking about if you "take the 16".

blueblazes

@Emby So when I first moved to the Portland metro, the traffic reports were incomprehensible to me because: The Sunset, The [Terwilliger]Curves, The Tunnel, and The Banfield. JUST TELL ME THE NUMBERS DAMMIT.

flanhoodles

@Emby I grew up in Washington state and we always called it "the 5" and "the 405". Now I live in a weird part of northern California that has almost no native northern Californians, and I feel like we all say different things.

Calling highways/freeways "interstates" bugs me though.

blueblazes

@flanhoodles I grew up in a flyover state where we just said "the interstate" because there was literally only one freeway in the whole entire place. It feels so cosmopolitan to have to specify nowadays.

melmuu

I moved from Oregon to Massachusetts during high school. I took like a natural to the "soda" over the "pop." But "bubblah" just sounds silly. : ) Also, they said, "Don't be fresh," unironically if you were misbehaving, and "You're a piece of work" if they found you to be strange.

melmuu

@melmuu Also, frappes!

Lily Rowan

@melmuu I was just talking to my grandmother about how the problem with going other places is that you can't get a coffee frappe. They don't know what a frappe is, and they don't have coffee syrup!

(Even worse, now they would think you want a Frappuccino kind of coffee drink, not an ice cream drink!)

Hot Doom

@melmuu I forgot about the frappes! I had heard it as "frappé" out west, but that é went straight out the window in Mass.

AnalogMetronome

@melmuu When I moved to Mass from NC last August, I was SO confused by the lack of milkshakes at ice cream places. Until I figured out (three months later...) that that's what "frappes" were.

fondue with cheddar

@melmuu Bubblah sounds like Bubbeleh. :)

@Lily Rowan I thought Frappés were just coffee!

iceberg

@fondue with cheddar no no no, it's pronounced "BUB-luh" first syllable is same as the first syllable of bubble.

whizz_dumb

@melmuu In Chicago, this dude from Oregon would get pissed at EVERYONE because we all said "OregAHn" in true Chicago fashion. I have corrected this but still keep sharp "o"s for a lot of things. HAHT DAHG

melmuu

@whizz_dumb YES, I forgot about that! They all pronounced it "Orrygone" and I was like what is WRONG with you people? : )

TheJacqueline

@melmuu Huh I never realized "Don't be fresh" and "You're a piece of work" are regional! (Mass bred and born). Interesting!

Lily Rowan

@fondue with cheddar There is definitely no accent on the e -- frappe just sounds like frap.

fondue with cheddar

@iceberg Oh, I phrased that in a confusing way. I know how it's pronounced, I just thought it reminded me of bubbeleh. I didn't mean "sounds" literally, which is totally how anyone reading this thread would naturally interpret it. D'oh!

fondue with cheddar

@Lily Rowan I can't help spelling it correctly—former French student. I don't say frap-PAY aloud because it would sound too pretentious.

Lily Rowan

@fondue with cheddar As a French word, I'm sure there is an accent. As a New England English word, no accent, one syllable.

fondue with cheddar

@Lily Rowan Fortunately for me I don't drink coffee so I don't have to worry about it. ;)

Well...unless I go someplace where they don't say "milkshake."

SuperGogo

@whizz_dumb Welcome to the Northern Cities Vowel Shift. It's growing and you can't fight it.

chevyvan

I remember hanging with my Wisconsin cousins as a kid and one of them asking my aunt if they could go get a drink from the bubbler. My mind was blown.

like a rabid squirrel

@chevyvan Yeah, I moved from NY to WI this year and it took me an embarrassingly long (dehydrated) time to realize that my spin instructor was directing us to the water fountain when she said "bubbler." I had no idea this was even a thing.

Lily Rowan

On the bubblah/brender front, I have recently heard someone ordering an omelet with two cheeses: feter and cheddah, so that is alive and well!

Heat Signature

Also, here in Maine SO MANY people say "draw" (and spell it like that) instead of "drawer". THAT IS SO INCORRECT!

Amphora

@Heat Signature Ugh it bothers me so much, all the kids from Boston in my college said "draw." One girl's last name was Rohrer and it always turned into "Raw" or "Rawah" too.

Linette

@Heat Signature This was a ghetto Oakland thing, too, except they were using it to refer to underwear. "Pull up your draws."

chunk lite

@Linette draws is totes a southernism for underwear. It's actually drawers but we drop consonants like they are hot.

districter

@Heat Signature But how many people thought they were called "chester drawers" instead of "chest of drawers." Oh yeah that was just me until I was a teenager.

chunk lite

@districter I thought it was chester draws until I was 21.

the roughest toughest frail

@chunk lite My dad's from Chicago and bafflingly pronounces "chest of drawers" in a way that sounds like "dresser droors", so I was in high school before I figured out that it is either "dresser" or "chest of drawers".

meetapossum

Hoagie 4eva.

meetapossum

@meetapossum Like, I honestly didn't realize how different Jersey/Philadelphia was from the rest of the country before. No one else pronounces syrup like us??

meetapossum

Obviously "Mary" and "merry" are the same and "marry" is different.

olivebee

@meetapossum As a Pittsburgh native, that sandwich one was my favorite. Pennsylvania: the only place you can get a "hoagie."

Emby

@meetapossum All the same to me! And "pin" and "pen" are the same, too! Muahahahaha

meetapossum

@olivebee NO ONE else says hoagie?? It is baffling. This is like when I went to college and realized no one else knew what pork roll was.

meetapossum

@Emby Noooooo. *throws self away*

coolallison

@meetapossum My husband and I get into almost fights about the way to pronounce syrup. I sent him this map to show him that I have most of the country on my side (thus making me more right? I don't know.)

hellonheels

@meetapossum I actually objected to that one on the grounds that if grinder had been presented as an option, large parts of New England would be a different color. No one called them subs until Subway came along!

fondue with cheddar

@meetapossum Hoagie! Mary, merry, and marry are all different, though.

meetapossum

@fondue with cheddar I keep saying them over and over again, but Mary and merry still sound the same to me. This is like when I made all my friends take the dialect quiz I found on Tumblr and we just stopped remembering how we pronounced words.

Ophelia

@hellonheels True, but technically grinders are hot. So you can have a meatball grinder and a turkey sub. You can thank my elementary school cafeteria for that bit of arcana.

hellonheels

@Ophelia Even that is regional. Where I grew up in NH, any sandwich on a long roll was a grinder, regardless of temperature.

fondue with cheddar

@meetapossum It's hard to write it phonetically when everyone pronounces their vowels differently! We say the vowel in "merry" the way Brits do, as John Cleese pronounces "Eric" in Eric the Half-a-Bee. Just the "e" though, not the "r."

TheLetterL

@meetapossum To me, they're the equivalent of fairy/berry/Carrie. All distinct, although probably more distinct when I stop to think about them rather than in normal conversation.

meetapossum

@TheLetterL Yeah, I see the problem, because the vowels in "fairy" and "berry" sound the same to me.

fondue with cheddar

@TheLetterL They sound very distinct to me.

This is all so interesting!

steponitvelma

@TheLetterL The middle of all those words are pronounced the same as well, aren't they?

alicke

@meetapossum made to order hoagie from wawa 4eva. said with a philly accent ("hewgie"). with a turkey hill ice tea and herr's.

alicke

@alicke annnd a tastykake

Hot Doom

@meetapossum I was on the phone with my English husband and were talking about this bald patch he gets in his beard (as you do). I said 'ha! you could call it Harry! ahahahahahaahaha ha, get it? it's ironic!' because in my west coast accent, Harry and hairy are homonyms, and for him, that joke made absolutely no sense because the two words out his mouth sound pretty different. Granted, it was a bad joke, but having to explain it made it about 10x worse. Anyway.

meetapossum

@alicke I make a point to go to Wawa every time I go to my parents' house. Wawa <3

@Hot Doom I would get the joke, but "Harry" and "hairy" sound different to me!

fondue with cheddar

@alicke WAAAAIT..."hewgie"? I have lived near Philly for 35 years and have never heard "hewgie." Only HOH-gee.

fondue with cheddar

@meetapossum OH SHIT, I JUST FIGURED OUT WHY THE HENDERSONS CALLED HIM "HARRY."

alicke

@meetapossum me too!!

rangiferina

@fondue with cheddar ...me too

alicke

@fondue with cheddar just with a pinched "o" like the philly accent. I don't know what the spelling would be! "heauwgie"?

meetapossum

@alicke You mean that weird Philly "o" in "home"?

fondue with cheddar

@alicke OHHH I see what you mean. I thought you meant something like "hewn" or "Hugh." I used to say a more moderate version of that "o" but I lost it when I went to college. Now I can't say it if I try! I say HOH-gee.

alicke

@fondue with cheddar lol hughgie

iceberg

@Hot Doom Haha do sauce and boss rhyme in your accent? because they don't in mine and I bet they don't in his either!

Hot Doom

@iceberg haha yes they do! And to top it off, his name has the same sound that boss and sauce have in my accent, and for him and his friends (and Aussie relatives!) it does not. So basically I sound like a big American goofball all the time.

fondue with cheddar

@iceberg Me too! How do you pronounce them differently? Is this an Ozzie thing? ;)

iceberg

@fondue with cheddar sauce has the long awww vowel sound and boss is the short O sound like in Pop? except that might not even explain how short it is if you are one of the americans who says pahhp.
reminds me of how "heart" in Aussie accent sounds like "hot" in American accent.

Hot Doom

@iceberg That's it! The sound in 'pop'. I just can't do it. Ditto for the UK sound of the o in 'yogurt'

blueblazes

@TheLetterL Those are all the same to me... (?)

A. Louise

Anywhere else in the world call the front strip of yard between the street and the sidewalk the "devil strip"? People look at me like I'm speaking another language when I say that.

A. Louise

@frigwiggin I never knew about this! Thanks!

rien à dire

Can we also talking about making stores possessive? E.g., Walmart's, Barnes & Noble's. I mostly hear this from my Arkansan grandmother.

olivebee

@rien à dire Oh god, I HATE that. Pittsburghers do it, too. When I moved away from there and tried to describe the [horrible] Pittsburgh accent (that is completely unique to the region), I basically said it was like a Southern accent and a Boston accent had a really ugly baby. But even that doesn't do it justice.

ETA: My favorite of this is that everyone in PBurgh says Cawssco's for Costco. It is not possessive, and it has a T.

yeah-elle

@rien à dire Stores that sound like names of people are made possessive (ie Macy's is already possessive, stores like Sears and Alberstons already sound possessive, so Nordstom is made Nordstrom's to match, Barnes & Noble's, etc) but stores that are clearly not a person's name (ie Walmart, Lucky, Safeway) are not made possessive.

adorable-eggplant

@yeah-elle Whoa. I have always thought it was 'Nordstrom's'. Like I just googled it for visual confirmation. Agreed that I would not say Walmart's or Target's, although I'm from a peripherally southern, not so much old south state.

iceberg

@yeah-elle here in coastal GA I've heard Kroger referred to as both "the Kroger" and "Kroger's"

TheBelleWitch

@iceberg That's really funny, it's totally either The Kroger or Kroger's in east TN, where I grew up! I didn't ever think about that before -- and I definitely still think of the place as Kroger's. Ditto Nordstrom's.

adorable-eggplant

@iceberg One time I casually asked my boyfriend if he wanted to go to "the downtown" and he has not stopped laughing since.

the roughest toughest frail

@rien à dire My husband's family does that! "I need to go to Target's" or "Let's go to Boca's for dinner." It drives me NUTS.

par_parenthese

@rien à dire Pet. Peeve.

enic

@rien à dire I'm from California and my mom is from Connecticut and I still say Nordstrom's, so. "Barnes and Noble's" bugs the hell out me. Walgreen's is actually Walgreens, with no apostrophe? And Traders Joe's? Macy's.

RachelAnn

@rien à dire My North Carolinian Grandma called Ruby Tuesday "Ruby's Tuesday" which never ceased to amuse me/annoy my mom. She was also basically deaf, which may have added to her pronounciation confusion. I still refer to that classy establishment and the Stones song as "Ruby's Tuesday" in her honor.

juksie

@iceberg Noooo Kroger and Kroger's are both fine but "the Kroger" sounds off! In Louisville it's a lot of "'s" on things, but that's because most places they are already there! Sear's, Dillard's, Kohl's, Macy's? the local grocers are Doll's and Paul's. Basically it doesn't surprise me that older people especially say that- it's just how things used to be!
But also I 100% didn't know that it was just Nordstrom... blowing my mind.

yeah-elle

@RachelAnn My mom calls Trader Joe's "Trader's Joe" because, she says, a "joe" is like, a catch-call, multi-use tool/place/friend?? So she thought it was like, "The Trader's Convenient Multipurpose Store" instead of "A Trader Named Joe Owns This Establishment."

adorable-eggplant

@juksie I know! I did an actual double take.

blueberry mary

@RachelAnn I have a brother who has some developmental disabilities and he refers to it as Rusby's Tuesbys. My family thinks it's hilarious and we call it that whenever we see one.

yeah-elle

I have a question! I work at an ice cream shop and while the vast majority of our customers order "scoops" (this is the word we use as well), some people order "dips." WHAT IS THIS?

Also tourists often translate directly to "balls," which never fails to amuse me.

olivebee

@yeah-elle Isn't a dip where the ice cream scoops are dipped into melted chocolate that hardens on the ice cream? That's what I grew up understanding...

yeah-elle

@olivebee A little internet research tells me that this is possibly a generational rather than a regional thing.

Weirdly enough, I just realized that we call the freezer we scoop out of "the dipping case" rather than "the scooping case" so whooo knowwsss?

does it need saying

@yeah-elle for 1 scoop, you would dip the scoop in twice, so 1 dip, or if you dip the scoop in twice 2 dips?

Hurricanoes

@yeah-elle This does not clarify regional or generational, but I just came across "dips" of ice cream in Toni Morrison (The Bluest Eye) yesterday!

rangiferina

the merry/marry/Mary one stills boggles my mind. I had no idea most of the country pronounced them the same until college! *clings to my distinct vowel sounds*

coolallison

@rangiferina I keep saying them over and over and cannot seem to not pronounce them all the same.

maybe partying will help

@coolallison

Yeah, like, how is my mouth supposed to be going? What sound am I supposed to be making? They all sound the saaaaame!

rangiferina

@maybe partying will help

"marry" has the sound of "mat" (/æ/) and "merry" has the sound of "met" (/ɛ/) - I think my "Mary" is the same as yours, probably.

(on a related note, Erin and Aaron have totally different sounds too!)

Faintly Macabre

@maybe partying will help Mary is like mare-y, merry is meh-ry, marry is mahh-ry! (Like yelling "aaah," not sighing "aaah") Relatedly, I get a lot of shit for how I pronounce Laura and Laurel.

Edit:
@rangiferina: your explanation is much more coherent than my explanation!

fondue with cheddar

@coolallison We probably pronounce Mary the same as you, but the rest are different.
merry = MEH-ry (short e sound)
marry = MAAA-ry (short a sound)

Emby

@fondue with cheddar I can (sort of) hear the difference, but I literally cannot make my mouth say the difference. My brain has internalized the pen/pin merger to a very extreme degree.

Ophelia

@Faintly Macabre Based on your Mary/marry/merry vowels, I have a hunch we say "Laura" and "Laurel" the same way. To me, they both have the same vowel sound as "lore."

Faintly Macabre

@Ophelia I think your way is the "correct" way, or close? I say both with the same a as in "lark," but a bit longer.

Linette

@Faintly Macabre MAWWIDGE.

fondue with cheddar

@Ophelia I say AUR in "Laura" like "R" (the way you pronounce the name of the letter). I think the way people say it is pretty mixed in my region (Philly area).

@Emby I had a friend in grade school who pronounced "pen" and "pin" the same, so much that she spelled my name wrong (which rhymes with one of those words).

meetapossum

@fondue with cheddar My name is Laura and I used to get frustrated with people who called me "Lor-a." It's like "LAW-RA." But now I've moved to NY and have just given up even trying to correct people.

ETA: People used to overcorrect and say "Lara." Arrrrghhh, no that's not right either.

itiresias

@rangiferina i was just laughing at this - i clicked it because i thought the data would be ridiculous, having no idea that THE WHOLE COUNTRY EXCEPT FOR THE TWO PLACES I'VE LIVED pronounce them all the same.

fondue with cheddar

@meetapossum I say LAW-ra, so when people said the name of my neighbor Laurie growing up, I thought her name was Lory.

mynamebackwards

@rangiferina I am from detroit and I married a new yorker. we have gotten into ACTUAL FIGHTS about merry/Mary kind of stuff. we have a female friend named erin and a male friend named aaron (two names that are homophones to me) and it makes me crazy that I will say something about "erin or aaron" and he will say "which one?" WHAT DO YOU MEAN "WHICH ONE????!!!!" ONE IS A BOY AND ONE IS A GIRL!!!

karenb

@mynamebackwards yeah, for me aaron and erin (and, since i know one, ehren!) are all pronounced the same, so i would have to ask which one you were referring to.

mynamebackwards

@karenb in my irritation at revisiting these regional clashes, I probably didn't explain myself as well as I could have :) I meant that I say them the same and he says them as two different names. so I could be very clearly speaking about erin the girl, but because I say the two names the same, he gets "confused" about which one I am referring to.

Bittersweet

@meetapossum Just to provide another wrinkle, we have a friend from Colombia named Laura. She pronounces it "LAO-ra" because that's that's how you say it in Spanish.

rien à dire

@meetapossum LAW-ren here, feeling your pain. "Loren" is a boy's name!

kellyography

@rien à dire If you were introduced to me as Law-ren, I would call you Loren, for sure. Saying it Law-ren sounds like I'm putting on a Southern accent. An ex-boyfriend of mine dated and married an Anna (pronounced Awn-uh) immediately after dumping me, so I can't tell if it's regional or spite that makes me call her Ann-a.

adorable-eggplant

OOOoh I have another one! What do you call a dish/food thing that is a flat, crispy shell with beans, lettuce, tomatoes and shredded cheese on top. Please weigh in and I will tell you where you are from.

olivebee

@adorable-eggplant A tostada?

karenb

@adorable-eggplant a single flat shell? tostada? but if it's u shaped, that's a taco.

coolallison

@adorable-eggplant I grew up in west Texas and called them chalupas, but then when I moved to "the City" (heh, Dallas) it seemed that everyone calls them tostadas. I think I go back and forth because I don't know what I'm supposed to say.

Emby

@adorable-eggplant Tostada

adorable-eggplant

@coolallison Yes!! I have all my life called them chalupas (which are made by putting fixings on a tostada which is just the shell part according to the dictionary in my head) but I come from the south/central part of Texas and apparently it's somewhat like 'Bowie knife' in that we are the only people that say it that way.

My bf is from Southern California and it was a source of endless confusion at the beginning of our relationship.

Thank you all for playing.

ETA: I have stuck with chalupa, because I wouldn't have it any other way, but have resorted to sending texts like, "Let's have chalupas[tostadas] tonight." Because I can (grudgingly) compromise.

Ophelia

@adorable-eggplant This is random, but I always thought tostadas were flat, and chalupas were bowl-shaped?

maybe partying will help

@Ophelia

I thought they were too.

adorable-eggplant

@adorable-eggplant Not in my neck of the woods. A homemade chalupa will naturally be a little wonky (not bowl shaped, per se, but slightly curved) because the tortilla will warp when fried. But if I'm bent on not making a mess in my kitchen and buying them pre-fried (or baked, however they make crunchy shells crunchy in the industrial world) then I'll get the flat ones. It's super regional though, the valley through central Texas. I'm not even sure what they'd call it up in Dallas.

If I were using a bowl shaped shell, I might put more lettuce and call it a taco salad? I don't know though, cause I've never made those at home, but that's what I'd expect if I ordered it at a restaurant.

So for me chalupa = exactly what everybody else calls a tostada. But only with beans, cheese, shredded lettuce, tomatoes and sometimes onions. NO CABBAGE SLAW (looking at you california).

whizz_dumb

I grew up on the Illinois side of the IL-WI border, in the middle where the blue meets the red in the above map. It is a contentious area. Look how much that border matters. It is a war zone for dialect and sports alliances. I think Wisconsinites want to rebel from what Illinois people do so much that they don't even have drinking fountains throughout the southwest part of the state. They don't even have a word for them. "A what?" *hard threatening stare* whispers: "You better watch your mouth, you have uttered what shall not be named." Talking nicely: "Now let's go get a soda." "You mean pop?" *fight erupts*

Amphora

@whizz_dumb Growing up in Chicago we had lots of fights over soda vs. pop. I thought it had more to do with the fact that the African-American kids were largely from families who had come up from the South in the Great Migration of the 30s and 40s and retained the regional pronunciations, like for car-ml and ahnt (aunt). It also explained why I was so confused going to college in Massachusetts where everyone said ahnt instead of ant for Aunt...didn't occur to me that white people pronounced it that way in the north.

whizz_dumb

@whizz_dumb ~Racist.~ I'm joking. Moving to Chicago was so good for a boy from a predominantly white small town in the boonies. It seems like ethnic dialects persist through generations in Chicago more than in a lot of other cities (even Polish, Ukrainian...etc). I could be wrong, but The Bay Area here seems more diffuse in dialects.

olivebee

About 2 years ago, my husband and I argued over the pronunciation of crayon. He thought I was a total weirdo and completely nuts for saying "cray-awn." He says "cran." When I saw these maps yesterday, I immediately emailed him the crayon one because I fit in with the entire Western U.S. and he only fits in with Northwest Wisconsin. And he is from Pennsylvania. I win.

olivebee

@olivebee Actually, come to think of it, we had that argument a few days after having one about the pronunciation of "experiment." I say "ex-pehr-i-ment" (second syllable sounds like spare/pear), and he says "ex-peer-i-ment" (second syllable sounds like spear/peer).

What say you all?

adorable-eggplant

@olivebee Your way is the sane way.

karenb

@olivebee i've got one as a noun and one as a verb in my head, but i've repeated them to myself too many times, and now i can't tell which is which.

rosaline

@olivebee I say "cran" too, and I grew up nowhere near Wisconsin! That one blew my mind.

TheJacqueline

@olivebee ex - peeeeer - i - ment

He is wack on the crayon thing, though.

rien à dire

@olivebee I say "ex-peer-i-ment" and I've been told by my New Jersey coworker that this was wrong. (I took the high road and refrained from reminding her that she was from Jersey.) Now I'm questioning things...is this also a regional pronunciation?

TheLetterL

@olivebee I can't remember how to say words anymore! I've just been muttering "experiment" to myself and both sound right. Throwing self away now...

steponitvelma

@olivebee I also say "cran" and I'm from CA

Hot Doom

@rien à dire Ex-peer-iment. You - ahem- we are correct.

karenb

i've got one, i ran into this with my long islander roommate - so the sun "shone" yesterday, is that with a) a long o sound (shown) or b) a short one (shawn)?

rangiferina

@karenb Shone rhymes with bone for me! and I'm also a Long Islander, so I'm curious what your roommate says...

EDIT: WAIT I actually have no idea how I pronounce it. I just said it without thinking and it was totally different (rhymes with "on"). oh noooo

karenb

@rangiferina you agree with her! for me it rhymes with "dawn" or "fawn".

annejumps@twitter

@karenb Whoa, I've never heard of that. ???

rangiferina

@karenb does "dawn" sound the same as "don" for you? (they're different for me - dAWn and dAHn)

whizz_dumb

I spent a lot of time selecting different maps and now I'm mad that there isn't one for "remote" or "clicker" for the thing that changes stations on the TV remotely. An ex said "clicker", which I thought was cute. Oh and "pellow" for '"pillow", not as cute. Maybe I missed these in that list.

olivebee

@whizz_dumb The only people I ever knew who said "clicker" were over the age of 50. There is also the option of "channel changer."

meetapossum

@olivebee I still say "channel changer," but I'm generally in the minority.

whizz_dumb

@olivebee She's way under 50, but Minnesotan. I knew I was missing one, I'm fine with "channel changer".

par_parenthese

@whizz_dumb I definitely say "clicker" but in my head I say "monkey troll" because that's how a little boy I used to nanny mondegreened "remote control."

Ophelia

@whizz_dumb I say "channel changer" but "clicker" was definitely used when I was growing up, just not by my family. (it was pronounced "clickah")

whizz_dumb

@par_parenthese haha monkey troll. Just read the "mondegreen" wiki. Hmm.

KatieBarTheDoor

@whizz_dumb I'm going to chime in with the weirdo answer of "zapper." That's what my (southern) parents always called it, so I do too. Though if I had to pick another, I'd say "remote."

blueblazes

@KatieBarTheDoor NO NO NO. A zapper is a microwave. The clicker is what you use to change the channel.

ach_so

@whizz_dumb Clicker!

Amphora

@par_parenthese I always say "clicker"...oh god I feel so provincial reading all this

No Whammies

The discovery of drive-through liquor stores was one of the few bright spots of moving to Arizona.

Emby

@No Whammies You mean besides the great weather 9 months out of the year, the sunsets, the mountains on the horizon, the sheer diversity of environment as you move north to south in the state, and the unrivaled Mexican food??

(I have lived in DC for too long and I am missing Arizona.)

juksie

@No Whammies explaining drive-through liquor stores to people when I moved from KY to PA was one of my favorite things- all liquor stores here are state-owned, so it is just mystifying to them. The intensity of the blue on that map in the middle of KY just warms my heart.

iceberg

Ooh what about "aunt" i didn't see a map for that - do you pronounce it ahnt or like the insect ant? this one has a racial divide here, black people say ahnt and white people say ant.

Lily Rowan

@iceberg New Englanders all say ahnt, in my experience. Or, more precisely, we say aunt! Not ant! See the difference? ;)

par_parenthese

@iceberg It's definitely both here in Kentucky, also the diminutive/affectionate form "auntie." I am "Awn-tee" Par and "Ann-tee" Par pretty equally among my friends' kids.

hellonheels

@iceberg If you click through to the full set, that's the first map.
Incidentally I have one ant and two ahnts, because the ant is from Oklahoma and that is how she referred to herself when I was little.

maybe partying will help

@iceberg

This is something, people within my own family pronounce it differently. I say "ant," my cousin says "ahnt." We grew up very closely too. I think maybe it's because his mother is Bahamian and he spent a good amount of time there when he was a kid?

Ophelia

@iceberg I'm from New England, and I say ahnt - I've actually had people ask if my parents were British when I'm elsewhere in the US (they are not). I remember as a kid someone correcting someone else for saying "ant" - "You invite your aunts to a picnic; you certainly do not invite any ants."

pajamaralls

@iceberg I say ahnt, but I'm black and southern so it ends up rhyming with hunt.

Amphora

@iceberg I commented on this above - in the midwest it definitely divides by race.

rangiferina

@iceberg I say "ant" but my brother definitely says "ahnt." dunno how that happened!

Elsajeni

@hellonheels Huh, the green option on that map, which is "ahnt" for the general concept and "ant" in front of a name, is the way I say it! I had no idea other people did that.

maybe partying will help

Now that I'm thinking about pronunciations, I want to poll y'all about "orange." Orange like arnj? Or orange like ornj? Or orange like Renee Zellweger in Empire Records, which I occasionally say when I'm peeling oranges and commentating dramatically to myself?

Also, my manfriend once pointed out to me that I said "either" (ee-ther) and "neither" (neye-ther) in the same sentence. Oops.

par_parenthese

@maybe partying will help Orange. Has. Two. Syllables. IT JUST DOES.

karenb

@par_parenthese yup: ore-anje.

meetapossum

@maybe partying will help ORNJ. I really hate when people say "arnj," even though pretty much everyone I know says it that way. It starts with an "o", people!

Ophelia

@karenb You are correct.

fondue with cheddar

@karenb @meetapossum I say AR-enj! I don't know why, because I say OR-egon.

meetapossum

@fondue with cheddar My whole family says it with an "AR", so I don't know why I say it differently :(

Linette

@maybe partying will help I just tried to figure out what I say and guys I have completely lost the ability to pronounce the word orange. Send help.

olivebee

@maybe partying will help Definitely OR. My mom, from Long Island, says AHR, and it drove me up a wall as a kid. I was like, "Mom, it clearly starts with an O."

maybe partying will help

@all

ALSO

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR PRONUNCIATIONS OF "CICADA" POSTHASTE.

So alone in my "ki-ka-da" apparently.

Lily Rowan

@maybe partying will help Here is a whole discussion for you!

karenb

@maybe partying will help sick-EH-da? although i am from somewhere that doesn't have them, so.

maybe partying will help

@Lily Rowan

Damn, I have Latin on my side. Good times. Thanks for the link!

par_parenthese

@maybe partying will help Well, you have one pronunciation of Latin on your side. At my school it would be chi-kah-dah. ;)

stonefruit

@karenb in DC - where there are *plenty* of these - it's sih-KAY-duh. Or "foul beasts from the depths of Satan's own underpants." Your call.

EpWs

@stonefruit the swarm is coming

Also, I pronounce it the way you do.

playingpossum

@maybe partying will help Sick-ah-dah - and we have millions of the damn things!
Also orr -ange! Two syllables and pretty phonetic

Rock and Roll Ken Doll

Haha, looks like about a quarter of respondents in my home town answered "What word do you use for gawking at someone in a lustful way?" with "I have no word for this activity."

meetapossum

@Rock and Roll Ken Doll People from my hometown said we had drive-thu liquor stores, and we definitely did NOT. Where were they buying their alcohol??

Rock and Roll Ken Doll

@meetapossum
no one tell meetapossum about the secret liquor store...

fondue with cheddar

@Rock and Roll Ken Doll OHgle, not OGGle.

iceberg

@fondue with cheddar CORRECT oh god that one bugs me. people always say oooh-gle, and I'm like, NO, it only has one O!

annejumps@twitter

@iceberg I've seen "oggle" too. Argh!

fondue with cheddar

@iceberg I've never heard oooh-gle! I have heard people pronounce it to rhyme with "boggle."

par_parenthese

@iceberg Wait wait oogle? As in Google minus the G?? That is terrible.

stonefruit

@iceberg A whole CAR full of people once (spring 2008) made fun of me for pronouncing this "oh-gle," insisting on "ooh-gle." I let it slide because I am pretty sure I'm insufferable about words 99.9% of the time, but it still chafes, oh yes, IT CHAFES.

iceberg

@par_parenthese exactly!

@stonefruit OMG let's go back in time and fight them together! So wrong!

stonefruit

@iceberg TO THE TARDIS.

(I don't watch that show, did I say that right)

Amphora

Waaaait a minute, only Chicagoans say "gym shoes"? Is that cause we invented Air Jordans or something?
(also I love "The City" because we moved from Chicago to New Jersey and back recently and started to get confused about which City)
(also this is great fodder for my ongoing linguistic battle with my Toronto-born husband - "drama" has an "ah" in it, dammit!)

maybe partying will help

@Amphora

I was kind of confused by that one because I've never heard anyone say "The City" and expect me to know that they meant a specific city.

karenb

@Amphora we said gym shoes as kids in NS, but we had specific shoes for gym class (also: indoor shoes) and i don't remember it continuing into adulthood. (generally sneakers, occasionally runners)

olivebee

@Amphora I use gym shoes and sneakers interchangeably, but for me, tennis shoes are more like Keds - canvas or fabric and not meant for running or exercising.

Amphora

@olivebee That's how I think of them too - a specific category of rubber-soled shoe (though not necessarily practical for tennis even).

whizz_dumb

@Amphora haha we really upped the sporting shoes world. "Sneakers" sounds dorky. "Gym shoes" is literal and correct in my mind.

alicke

@olivebee I was just coming here to complain about that! Yinz & youse...my rural PA highschool often had a handwritten sign up at lunch that read "Sunny D for youse". See also: "Can I get you something to drink awhile?"

pajamaralls

We're southern, but my family has a distinction between usages of pecan. For example , we have a PEE-can tree in our front yard, and I love PEE-can pie. But I also love butter pee-KAHN ice cream.

Also, syrup is one syllable. As is crayon. And my grandfather was called granddaddy but prounced gran-deddy.

Y'all. This is hilarious to me because in high school, one of my friends always assumed I was not originally from the south, mainly because of the way I said "daughter"

Hot Doom

@pajamaralls Yes! For me it feels wrong to say anything other than 'butter pee-kahn' ice cream, all other valid pronunciations aside.

noodge

as a native Chicagoan, who spent all my summers in Wisconsin, then moved near Philadelphia, then spent a considerable amount of time in England (and was married for 10 years to a Brit), then lived in San Deigo for 8 years, then moved back to Philly, I've readlized - with the help of these maps - that I am very linguistically confused.

(people around me will get in heated discussions about stuff like PEEcan or pihKAHN and I freeze with indecision - HOW DO I SAY IT I HAVE NO IDEA AHHHHHHH)

Amphora

@noodge The question is, do you say "Where are you" or "Where are you AT?" Adding the preposition used to drive the New Englanders crazy.

does it need saying

@Amphora But what if you say, "Where y'at?" because either of those options is too long.

itiresias

Mischief Night is a Jersey thing?

Etruscan Duck

@itiresias I can't believe they didn't map Cabbage Night, which is what we always called it.

EpWs

@Etruscan Duck I am terrible and didn't look at the maps yet, so I'm mystified--what is Mischief/Cabbage night? Why is it Cabbagey? And where are you from that this is a thing (I want to go to there)?

itiresias

@The Everpresent Wordsnatcher It's the night before Halloween. Kids go out and wreak havoc in their neighborhoods - toilet papering houses, egging cars, smashing pumpkins/decorations, stuff like that. Or worse, if the kids are assholes.

I am equally curious as to why it's Cabbagey.

fondue with cheddar

AAAAHH I AM GETTING NOTHING ACCOMPLISHED AT WORK AND I HAVEN'T EVEN LOOKED AT THE MAPS YET

whizz_dumb

@fondue with cheddar I know dude, falling behind as I type. I'll admit it, I have a problem. (that's the first step)

fondue with cheddar

@whizz_dumb My boss just left. I have to make sure to finish what I'm working on before he gets back or he will be suspicious!

Amphora

@fondue with cheddar But if you click through to the survey results site you can pick your hometown and see a detailed breakdown!

fondue with cheddar

@Amphora That sounds cool! I will definitely check it out when I have time to get sucked into the rabbit hole. :)

karenb

i would love to see these for canada - they'd be more subtle, i expect, until you get to the atlantic provinces, and then all bets would be off. although northern ontario accents are pretty distinct, too.

MilesofMountains

@karenb I think the northern Ontario accents are pretty similar to the northern BC accents. And there's the Ottawa Valley accent, too. And the pronunciation of "Toronto".

karenb

@MilesofMountains i go with "tore-ON-oh" but i know some people who say "tar-ON-ah" (which is weirdly american?)

Bittersweet

@karenb I love Canadian accents, and they are subtly different depending on where you're from.

I've only met one person in Canada who sounded like the MacKenzie brothers, though, and she ran a campsite on North Superior.

Rookie (not the magazine) (not that there's anything wrong with that)

@karenb There was a series about it on CBC a few years back! I don't remember much about it, except for the narrator at one point trying to express surprise at the fact that Montrealers say "hanger" for... I guess everyone else calls it a coat hanger? Clothes hanger?

miss olsen

You're addressing a cute small child in an elevator. Fill in the blanks!
"Could you .... the button for me please, .... ?"

fondue with cheddar

@miss olsen Push or press? Is that what you're going for? I say "push," but wouldn't bat an eye if someone said "pres."

miss olsen

@fondue with cheddar Yep! Push, press, or mash seem to be regional. Same with the endearments we use reflexively (sugar, sug, hon, honey, sweetie, love), I think? For instance, I would say "Push that button please, hon."

ETA Also I'm mostly just curious if people under 70 say "mash" for "push"

RK Fire

@miss olsen I would never use mash, even though it provides a very adorable mental image of a young child hamfistedly trying to manipulate objects or press buttons with their tiny, tiny fists.

RK Fire

@miss olsen I would never use mash, even though it provides a very adorable mental image of a young child hamfistedly trying to manipulate objects or press buttons with their tiny, tiny fists.

whizz_dumb

@miss olsen "hit", "punch", "finger"(no!)

saritasara

@miss olsen for a small kid, i would definitely say mash.

StandardTuber

AHN-vel-LOPE or EN-ve-LOPE?

RAUGH-ther or RA-ther?

oxy-MORON or OX-ZYM-moron?

karenb

@StandardTuber option 2, option 2, oxy-MOR-on.

districter

@karenb OK so now, where are you from? I grew up in Maryland and would pronounce all three the exact way as you.

StandardTuber

@karenb

How do you pronounce the following?

Marry

Mary

Merry
-----

A) All the same, MAR-RI
B) Each different: MAUR-RI, MAY-RI, and MEH-RI
C) The first two the same, MAR-RI, the last as MEH-RI.
D) Some other iteration

karenb

@districter currently toronto, by way of NYC but mostly Nova Scotia.

karenb

@StandardTuber MAR to me reads more like marr (smudge, mark, deface), but i pronounce all three the same, MARE-ee. i couldn't even conceive how to pronounce them differently, though, so thanks!

StandardTuber

@karenb Oh I hated learning phonetic spelling in my linguistics classes. Dialectical differences was the most fun part of those courses, and also only took up about one day's worth of lectures.

Thanks for playing!

karenb

@StandardTuber i was just thinking that we could do with knowing phonetic spelling, in this conversation. thanks for the link, it's useful!

stonefruit

@StandardTuber "Oxymoron, emphasis on the MORON." -- Dave Nields at the Birchmere circa 2001-02.

pinniped

@StandardTuber A friend made fun of my when I was a kid for saying "AWN-ve-lope", so I've consciously said "EHN-ve-lope" ever since. But now whenever I hear a perfectly respectable person say "awn-ve-lope" I think "AH-HA, seeee??" and feel quietly justified.

I also used to say "commercial" like "com-MORSH-el," not sure why.

missupright

@StandardTuber Oh wow, that's fascinating. I'd never even considered they might be pronounced the same. This is like when I found out that American people don't really differentiate the names Sara and Sarah.

StandardTuber

@pennylaner com-MORSH-el, I'm imagining that being said by a kid with a strong Queens accent. "Aw maaa, I luv dis comMORSHel!"

districter

This is amazing. Another one that comes to my mind is the word forrest. My boyfriend's family is from philly and they all say farrest.

Also I was astonished that sneakers was so regionalized.

districter

@districter Ooo anyone on here have a phrase to describe when one person needs to turn left onto a two lane road, and then first just pulls out into the closer lane, stopping all traffic traveling to the right, until they have a clear way to turn left. Someone from Mass. told me people call this a "Boston Pull Out" but I have never been able to determine if this was a thing.

StandardTuber

@districter No idea about the left turn issue, but there is probably a regional difference for when someone swings out to the left before making a right-turn. I've heard it called a South-Dakota-turn, because of the snow and slush that accumulates at the corners; those drivers swerve to avoid the snow before turning right.

MilesofMountains

@districter I was astonished that everyone was so wrong. They're RUNNERS, people.

Bittersweet

@districter We call it a Boston Left. Often necessary in our weirdly laid-out, smallish city.

Bittersweet

@MilesofMountains My mom always called them tennis shoes, whether they were used for tennis or not.

This is my new username

@MilesofMountains Yes, I just said this down thread, but they are runners whether they are for running or not.

RK Fire

I love that the little ol' Bmore metro area is one of the other places that refers to a place other than NYC as "the city." It's not because we're stupid or think that Bmore city is a hugely cosmopolitan place (ha ha ha ::cries::), it's because Baltimore City is an independent entity from Baltimore county and referring to "the city" versus "the county" is a helpful distinction.

stonefruit

@RK Fire That part had me scratching my head, though, because the Bay Area definitely calls SF "The City." Like, sometimes it's insufferable.

ach_so

@RK Fire I thought that question was silly. Obviously, for most people, it'd be the closest big city!

Judith Slutler

Disappointed that "pretty"/"purty" didn't make the list, on behalf of my Montana relatives!

chunk lite

oh! What do y'all call the thing with wheels you put groceries in? My ex-bf used to call it a trolley but he was british and I say buggy but get teased mercilessly for it. (ahh! words! i love them!!)

karenb

@chunk lite a cart, generally a shopping cart, but also maybe a grocery (sh-sounding "c") cart.

chunk lite

@chunk lite oh durp. I didn't see the full set of things. I guess I'm the weirdo with "buggy"!

anachronistique

@chunk lite Shopping cart!

yunkstahn

@chunk lite Are you from western PA/eastern Ohio? As a native of that section of the Rust Belt, I grew up saying "buggy" and always figured it was a Pittsburgh thing.

chunk lite

@yunkstahn I'm a deep south girl - Mobile, AL (which, incidentally, natives say like Mo-BEEL and tourists say like MO-beel)

par_parenthese

@chunk lite Some Southerners say "buggy"! You are definitely not alone.

iceberg

@chunk lite Trolley! (Aussie, everyone else here in GA calls it a shopping cart)

blueblazes

@yunkstahn My folks are transplants to that area, and visiting them was the first time I'd heard it called anything other than a shopping cart.

notdrinks

@chunk lite a carriage!

Olivia2.0

You know what else they've left out? The addition of a completely unnecessary "the" to specific types of stores - mostly of a grocery variety. This is a Chicago thing - NO ONE goes to "Jewel" only to THE jewel. I now also go to THE target, THE Dominicks, etc. When I'm at my mom's house I also go to THE Kroger - and my mother never fails to be confused.

.palindrome

@Olivia2.0 I'm from Central Illinois, but moved up to Chicago recently and we always say "Kroger's" or with an " 's "at the end. I actually have been made fun of a lot for this!!

koume

Does anyone else know where they drop out the "to be" section of sentences? As in, "that dish needs washed" instead of "that dish needs to be washed". I've only heard it since moving to Central Illinois, but it's got to be more widespread.

stonefruit

I lament the passing of the word cabinet to mean milkshake. I love both the etymology and the surreal imagery.

pinniped

In my various homes on the east coast we've all said "Cal-oh-ROD-o" for the state, but is it true out west you all pronounce it "Cal-oh-RAD (rhymes with mad)-oh"? Same with Nev-ODD-da vs. Nev-VAEH-dah.

And dare I even open the can of worms that is Appa-LAY-shun vs. Appa-LATCH-un mountains?

daisicles

@pennylaner It's Appa-LATCH-un, dammit!

(That's the only shred of regional dialect I really hold on to when I'm outside Tennessee, so it's important to me.)

stonefruit

@daisicles it is also OBJECTIVELY CORRECT, by G-d.

theharpoon

oh good, I can call shotgun anywhere in the US and people will HAVE TO HONOR IT

Apocalypstick

Alright, but is it skon or sc-oh-ne?

iceberg

@Apocalypstick the second one!!!!

lindsayishere

I had NO IDEA "sneakers" was mostly just a northeast thing. Really, rest of the country, you say tennis shoes? Also, no clue that only my area says sear-up. I've never heard anyone say sir-up.

Re: sandwiches. Wedges and grinders, anyone? I grew up ONLY using those terms. Apparently the latter is a Fairfield/Westchester counties thing. And does anyone else call a shopping cart a "wagon," or is that just my family being weird?

I really could talk about this stuff all day.

ach_so

@lindsayishere Yeah, tennis shoes, even though it makes little sense!

This is my new username

@lindsayishere Were I am (western Canada) we call them runners. REgardless of whether they are really for running or not.

Creature Cheeseman

@lindsayishere We mean tennis shoes but what we say is more like tenny- shoes?

Bittersweet

@lindsayishere In Eastern Mass we say "grinders" also. Where I grew up in northern VA, though, it was always "subs."

theharpoon

I wish he had made Tchopitoulas, Atchafalaya, bayou, and Lafayette maps. I met someone from Houston who said 'bay-oh' or something similarly ridiculous and I was like 'get out now'

ach_so

I'm so sad "wash" wasn't included! (Well, it might've been but I didn't have time to go through all his maps). I think it's dying out, but I still giggle every time I hear someone say "worsh" (my Gran does it hardcore).

The other Pittsburgh one I love is leaving out "to be" as in "The grass needs cut." I only realized it was a colloquial thing when a boyfriend pointed it out 2 years ago.

stonefruit

@rosinator Not just Pittsburgh! My friend from West Virginia, who went to UK for undergrad, did this. (Her room "needed cleaned." Her hair "needed cut.")

janejanejane

@rosinator a friend of mine would say that the grass needs done and she was born and raised in northern Canada. I always wondered where she came by the expression.

EpWs

Okay, riddle me this: is frustrated/fustrated a regional thing or an individual speech pattern thing? Because it pops up every now and then around here (central KY) but not enough to really feel like a regionalism.

theharpoon

ha! I bet 102938$ that the "area of grass that occurs in the middle of some streets" is the neutral ground for the 38% of people who say "other" in New Orleans

Creature Cheeseman

@theharpoon I find it hard to imagine that 60% of the people did NOT say neutral ground.

Elsajeni

I like that there's a map for how you pronounce "centaur," although I'm a little surprised that it does not include the option "I never have occasion to use the word 'centaur'."

Also: I call it a "crawfish" if I'm planning to eat it, but a "crawdad" if I'm not. I... have no idea why.

Amphora

@Elsajeni But some people don't even know what one is? that's just nonsense

Amphora

@Amphora A crayfish (hee), not a centaur, to be clear!

Bootsandcats

I like how -on the 'the city' one, there's a ring of blue around Minneapolis/St. Paul indicating that New York is not "the city", and then Minneapolis/St. Paul is red indicating that New York is "the city".

HereComesTheMetricSystem

Q: How do you refer to the two defendants:

"yoots"

"youths"

Psychbucket

I looked at all the maps -- absolutely fascinating. I lived the first 36 years of my life in the Kalamazoo, Michigan area and have been in the Inland Empire (Riverside/San Bernardino) area of California for the past 15 years. While there are more commonalities in speech than I thought between the two areas, I am definitely more Californian now. I'm fine with that. :-)

saritasara

Curious, how does everyone here say the word "ornery"?
I always pronounced it, well, "or-ner-y" but then my college roommate (from near Sacramento) would always say like "ON-ry"

I always thought she was totally insane but maybe it's actually a thing?

lucy snowe

@saritasara it's a thing. not how i say it, but i've heard it a lot. i use a lot of harsh R sounds and three syllables.

lucy snowe

It's a bubbler!

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merry = MEH-ry (short e sound)

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danialkhatri

with a cartoon of a woman holding a blender. An arrow pointing to the blender says "BLENDAH"; an arrow pointing to the woman says "BRENDER." Makes perfect sense. But "bubbler!" "Bubbler" I've never heard before.Estelle Andrews

danialkhatri

I own a T-shirt that says "Speaking 'Rhode Island' Like a Native: Lesson #1," for example, with a cartoon of a woman holding a blender. An arrow pointing to the blender says "BLENDAH"; an arrow pointing to the woman says "BRENDER." Makes perfect sense. But "bubbler!" "Bubbler" I've never heard before.Fridge freezer repairs London

danialkhatri

my rural PA highschool often had a handwritten sign up at lunch that read "Sunny D for youse". See also: "Can I get you something to drink awhile?"social media metrics tools

danialkhatri

with a cartoon of a woman holding a blender. An arrow pointing to the blender says "BLENDAH"; an arrow pointing to the woman says "BRENDER." Makes perfect sense. But "bubbler!" "Bubbler" I've never heard before.21 Day Fix

danialkhatri

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danialkhatri

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danialkhatri

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danialkhatri

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