Quantcast

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

8

Lisa: I thought this one was interesting (reading) “Have your attitudes about sex and power and women changed since that time? Can you delineate a few areas in which your ideas about sex relations and power relations and women’s place in culture and society and women and sex, etc., have changed most dramatically? Are there things you see and know now because of experiences you’ve had in the world that weren’t apparent then?”

I think this question appeals to me because everyone had their own way of being excited about Riot Grrrl, and for me—even before I ever heard of Riot Grrrl—it was something that I got more from the L7 strain of punk. I mean, I remember the first time I heard of or saw L7 it was like: What. The. Fuck. Holy shit, dude. This is what I want and need. Because I had come from this punk scene where I was a “slut,” but I was a feminist, I was raised as a feminist and so it was really confusing for me to try to reconcile these different parts of my experience. So the way that I tried to access that was through the concept of power and, again, this was before I heard of Riot Grrrl. It was: “I can be a powerful and sexy woman.” I think what I really like about Riot Grrrl is that it also acknowledges that a really big part of being a young woman—or a woman of any age—is the experience of danger and sexual violence.

Bookforum hosted a conversation between Lisa Darms, editor of the recently-released Riot Grrrl Collection, and contributors Kathleen Hanna and Johanna Fateman, featuring a series of really great questions from Hairpin pal Sheila Heti.

8 Comments / Post A Comment

adorable-eggplant

I was never a self-identified riot grrrl, perhaps I was too young, but that ethos was the driving force of my wild days and man it was so useful to cultivate that radical indifference to norms and the judgements of others. Standing up to the patriarchy = punk at its finest.

ETA: this part nailed it "I think what I really like about Riot Grrrl is that it also acknowledges that a really big part of being a young woman—or a woman of any age—is the experience of danger and sexual violence." Maybe I will retroactively call myself a riot grrrl.

katiemcgillicuddy

@adorable-eggplant Oh, count me in for retroactive riot grrrls. I was a little bit young for it too (and refused to call myself a feminist, despite the fact that, in action, I was one. Thanks again, catholic upbringing!) and now as an adult really wish someone had pushed the Riot Grrrl movement on me (you know, instead of the catholic fucking church).

adorable-eggplant

@katiemcgillicuddy I was totally a feminist (but in the mold of my 2nd wave badass grandmother)but gen-X missed me by a few hairs.

ETA: also, having been raised by an ex-catholic, congrats to you for getting out from under that stone. (progressive catholics, good on you doing your thing also, despite a lot of institutional hostility)

lookuplookup

Man, at this point in my life I feel like I'm a professional riot grrrl buzzkill. I identified so heavily with the riot grrrl ethos as a teen, but the riot grrrl revival of recent years (more often than not) just leaves a bad taste in my mouth. I feel like while interview participants have been smart & thoughtful & eager to complicate the discussion, so much has skewed towards unchecked nostalgia (and a disappointing lack of analysis re: riot grrrl and race and class). ETA: Not so much an issue with this particular interview and general coverage of the "riot grrrl revival". You know? Like, "Feels Blind" and "For Tammy Rae" and the massive box of zines under my bed are always going to mean something to me, but I have a hard time reconciling those feelings with the often politically reductive picture of riot grrrl that tends to dominate the internet these days.

I'm so glad that in more recent interviews Kathleen has talked a lot about complicating our understanding of riot grrrl and how talking about riot grrrl really can't begin/end with young women blogging about how they wished they were around in the 90's as an active participant in riot grrrl. & I do love what Johanna says in the end about working towards a culture where we value the creative voices of teenage girls & empower girls to act as agents of change...

I just wish that people weren't always looking backwards towards riot grrrl -- it'd be nice to see people talking about things that are going on now (like Ladyfest Philly, which happened earlier this month) & what we can do to help girls access resources that allow them to make zines or music, have safe(r) spaces for discussions, etc. You know? Like, great, replicas of Kathleen's "Kill Me" dress are being sold for $75 (and yes, the proceeds go to the Girls Rock Camp Alliance), but I feel weird that buying a wildly marked up version of a homemade clothing item is somehow preferred over working directly to support the GRCA? Especially when riot grrrl had such an anti-capitalist message by way of DIY?

Nukegrrrl

@lookuplookup We're not gonna prove nothing, nothing,
Sitting around, watching each other starve,
What we need is action, strategy,
I want, I want, I want,
I want it now!

Danzig!

Sorta unrelated, but this just popped back up on my radar: A free 5-disc(!) downloadable compendium of tracks from woman-fronted punk and post-punk bands, from '77-'89. Essential: http://kangnave.blogspot.fr/2013/05/a-reference-of-female-fronted-punk-rock.html

milenakent

Love this Song@n

mihi hiesl

I was never a self-identified riot grrrl, perhaps I was too young, but that ethos was theba bau thang thu 2 nen biet driving force of my wild days and man it was so useful to cultivate that radical indifference to norms and the judgements of others. Standing up to the patriarchy = punk at its finest.

Post a Comment

You must be logged-in to post a comment.

Login To Your Account