Quantcast

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

441

Ask a Glutton Who Wants to Help

1. Lentils. Why do I keep messing them up? They are never a) the same texture twice, or b) the texture I want them to be.

The big lentil secret that most recipes never seem to bother telling you is how totally different all of the varieties are. Each has it's own unique texture, flavor, and way that it likes to be treated. Hopefully a quick breakdown of the most common lentils, and what to do with them will help!

  • Yellow or Red Lentils: These are your classic dal lentils, perfect for soups and other loose puree things. They break down into mash when cooked, so don't use them for recipes where you want lentils to retain their structural integrity. For the best and easiest soupy red/yellow lentil thing, saute some onions, garlic, and ginger, throw in lentils and broth (a two cups of broth for every cup of lentils ratio usually works well), and finish it off with some sriracha and whatever greens you have lurking at the bottom of your vegetable drawer.
  • Puy or Green Lentils: The caviar of lentils, puy lentils are super fancy, French, and great in lentil salads. They hold their shape really well, and have a nice, kind of nutty flavor. Cook them simply, toss them with vinaigrette, and call it a salade aux lentils.
  • Black Lentils: These hold their shape really well, and make a great side dish braised with some root vegetables or turned into a salad with some garlic and fresh herbs. They're also delicious cooked in water, than tossed with pasta, caramelized onions, and kale.
  • Brown Lentils: Your basic workhorse lentils, what you should use if a recipe just says “lentils.” They make great soup, because they straddle the line between goopy and firm, and are also the best thing ever when cooked with fried onions and rice, like my Sephardic great grandma used to make.

If your problem is messing up the same variety in a number of ways, than the main thing to remember is to use enough liquid, and enough salt. Keep the temperature of your stove low as well to prevent those puppies from scorching, and you'll be fine. Recipes will tell you to add specific amounts of liquid, but really, you should keep checking and stirring and add whatever amount of liquid looks like it needs to be added. This is easier than it sounds, I promise. 

2. I am depressed. What should I eat that is not a tablespoon full of Nutella?

First off, I'm sending you lots of internet hugs. I've been there, and wasting away from a sadness-induced reluctance to eat is not an enjoyable way to spend your time.

In my experience, there are basically two varieties of depression. There's the awful kind of muggy sadness that suffuses everything you do, but still doesn't make it impossible to do things. You might feel like you're drowning, but at least you're on two feet, walking around, attending to the necessary functions of quotidian life. The best thing to do for this is to make minimally labor intensive foods that are just fiddly enough to be distracting, and produce results impressive enough that you'll feel like you've actually accomplished something. I recommend making a banana cream pie. Buy a premade pie crust to save yourself the pastry based stress, and bake it in the oven, weighed down by some dry beans so it'll hold its shape. Then whisk together three egg yolks, half  a cup of sugar, three tablespoons of cornstarch, and some flaky sea salt, adding three cups of milk and bringing the whole mess to a boil, stirring til it's thick. Take it off the heat, add two tablespoons of butter, a splash of vanilla, and sliced bananas (however many you have browning slowly in your fruit bowl). I recommend listening to weepy old country music while doing this, particularly Patsy Cline or George Jones. Wallowing in someone else's misery for a while can be a cathartic change. Put the pie in your fridge to chill for a few hours, then top it off with whipped cream and some shaved chocolate. Eat it by  yourself or with a sympathetic friend, and a big pot of black coffee. It's the culinary equivalent of a long, close hug.

The second kind of depression, the inky, paralyzing blackness people think of when they think of sadness, is rarer.  It is also infinitely harder to cook for. When you don't even want to get out of bed, it's hard to motivate yourself to peel carrots or pour things into pie crusts. My prescription for really severe sadness is a big bowl of pasta with bacon and roasted garlic. Put a pot of salted water to boil on the stove, then stick a big pan filled with a few glugs of olive oil, some unpeeled, garlic cloves, and chopped up bacon in the oven. If you're a vegetarian, just leave out the bacon; pasta al olio is also a noble tradition. Pour yourself some nice wine, and go read in the bath while it cooks, which should take about 15 or 20 minutes. When you come out, cook some pasta, smoosh the garlic out of its jacket, and toss everything together. Plonk it all into a big bowl, and go watch some bad British sitcoms in bed. Remind yourself that you are going to be okay. After all, you're a pasta wizard, how bad could things be?

3. What's a good baking recipe that's easy as placing a tray of Trader Joe's frozen food in the oven, but isn't placing a tray of Trader Joe's frozen food in the oven?

Oh, I feel you on this one. I was raised by people who ate well and baked often, and growing up I was an insufferable little food snob who thought cake mix cake was gross. Which seems crazy in retrospect, because it's a CAKE in a BOX; what could be better than that? But you know what IS better than that, and just as fast? Lightning Cake.

Lightning cake (which, if you wanna fancy it up, you can call Blintz Kutchen), is as easy, or easier, even, than any mix, and a million times more delicious. All you need to do is turn the oven on, grease up whatever pan you have handy, and mix together one stick of softened butter, one egg, one cup of milk, two cups of flour, and four teaspoons of baking powder. If you have any vanilla lying around, put some in there. If you have some old lemons softening in the back of the fridge, grate off their zest and add that. If you think it's too early in the morning to eat cake, sprinkle some brown sugar and nuts across the top and call it coffee cake. Then pop in in the oven, and about twenty minutes later, like magic, you will have an essentially perfect cake that's great with cut-up fruit, or jam, or ice cream, or just plain with a glass of milk, out of your hands in front of the fridge like some kind of animal, which is the way I like to do things.

4. What can I do when I wake up in the morning and realize I am out of milk for my coffee?

Hmm, this is a hard one. As a tea drinker, I don't have too much experience in the milkless coffee field, and googling around only got me a bunch of recommendations for almond or rice milk, which I figure most dairy consuming people don't just keep around on the regular. Other internet suggestions included vanilla ice cream, Bailey's, and making homemade milk out of whatever stray nuts you have lying around, all of which seems like a bit much for early in the morning.

There are, however, two solutions I have tried before. If you have condensed milk in your pantry, you can stir a bit of it into strong black coffee, which makes it taste deliciously sweet and caramel-y, like something you might buy from a street vendor in Saigon. I've also used whipped cream in the past, justifying my disgustingness with the existence of espresso con panna. But if neither of these admittedly baroque substitutions appeal to you, just pop the coffee in the fridge and pick up something nice at your neighborhood coffee shop, writing a reminder to buy milk on a post it note, and sticking it onto an object you're likely to look at over the course of the day. Because life's too short to suffer through coffee you don't want to drink.

Emily Beyda is a part time writer and full time snack enthusiast who lives in a treehouse in the Hollywood hills. Ask her anything.



441 Comments / Post A Comment

packedsuitcase

You forgot the best thing to do if you're out of milk for your coffee - ice cream.

frigwiggin

@packedsuitcase No, she didn't!

packedsuitcase

@packedsuitcase No you didn't. I apparently skimmed this way too fast. It is never too early for ice cream in your coffee!

Jizzcliner

@packedsuitcase Condensed milk, especially with cold brewed coffee.

chrysopoeia

@packedsuitcase canned coconut milk is pretty delicious too.

Emily Beyda

@packedsuitcase I like your style! I also agree that ice cream in coffee is a great idea, but would probably send me back to bed with a sugar coma pretty quickly. Clearly I have subpar ice cream tolerance!

trappedinabay

@packedsuitcase Or Bailey's Irish Cream!

packedsuitcase

@Emily Beyda I am going to have to suggest a daily ice cream regimen until your tolerance is sufficiently high.

aphrabean

@Emily Beyda Also, m'am, do you for reals live in a treehouse or is that ironic? B/c that is my dream.

Noelle O'Donnell

@trappedinabay Kahlua too!

packedsuitcase

@aphrabean I met a guy that lived in a treehouse one time. He had a window and the most amazing view ever.

KeLynn

@packedsuitcase ice cream coffee sounds magnificent with breakfast cake. Mmmmmmmm

anachronistique

PASTA WIZARD! I want it on a tee shirt.

In "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" Francie's dad puts a lump of butter in his coffee because it comes from cream. I have not yet tried this.

frigwiggin

@anachronistique I'm in the middle of listening to the audiobook of The Scorpio Races and Villain McBadguy (I forget his name) puts butter and I think salt in his tea? Bleah.

dj pomegranate

@anachronistique I...might have tried this. Would not recommend.

bnna

@anachronistique Once I went winter camping for college credit and I learned that nature people drink this stuff called super cocoa "to stay warm," which is hot chocolate with butter melted into it. I kind of loved it,

HereKitty

@dj pomegranate And yet, buttered toast dunked in sweet milky tea is sublime. Chemistry, you everlasting mystery.

PatatasBravas

@frigwiggin Was he Tibetan?

http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2011/11/yakkety-yak-tibetan-salty-butter-tea.html

Porn Peddler

@bnna One of my business partners used to drink this when she was living in a hellishly cold place on a research trip or something. When they came back, they tried it once and could not stomach like, a sip of it. But it was delicious and rich in hellish cold!

Lucienne

@HereKitty There's a scene in a Colette book where someone drinks "housemaid's coffee" - coffee with buttered toast crumbled in, and then boiled again. I have been SO CURIOUS about this, but never got round to figuring out how to really make it.

I never buy bread, anyway.

Emily Beyda

@anachronistique Ah, you're right! I love that book, so it's too bad I missed the chance to cop Francie's Dad's coffee steeze. Also; I am seriously contemplating getting pasta wizard business cards right now...

RNL
RNL

@anachronistique In general, don't do things that Francie's dad did.

Jill_Tata

This is so cool@k

Jaya

I have totally used butter in coffee and it's incredible. And also confirmed as a Thing by some other people http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/404155

dj pomegranate

@Jaya This thread makes it clear to me that I did not do this properly. Mine just ended up like, greasy?

up cubed

@Jaya Butter in cider is a delicious Thing.

Amphora

@upupandaway and Butter Beer!!

OhMyGoshYouGuys

@Jaya Yes! Butter is great blended with coffee. Also, coconut oil.

steponitvelma

@Jaya My dudefriend drinks his coffee with coconut oil and swears it's just as good, but I can't get past the oil slick look of it. ugh.

Linette

@Jaya Damn it guys I already eat way too much butter. Why must you feed my addiction?

Chareth Cutestory

@steponitvelma I've been doing the coconut oil thing lately with a little turbinado sugar, and I really like it! I agree that the greasy appearance is a bit much, though.

Paul_Funyun

@Jaya oh man my husband has been doing either coconut oil or butter in coffee lately and I have convinced him he's completely insane and now I feel a (tiny, tiny) bit bad.

PistolPackinMama

@Jaya salted butter tea= the best thing. I will try buttery coffee and hope it is Even Better. Because tea is fine, but I LOVE coffee.

frigwiggin

Ooh, yes! Food questions, so much love.

Why is the coffee at work so terrible? It's kind of sour and unpleasant. Is it just cheap coffee? What makes bad coffee bad? I'm gonna go make some oolong.

PatatasBravas

@frigwiggin It might be stale and old, specifically if your workplace is buying it already ground.

Getting only enough beans for like two weeks and keeping them whole, in a cool dark place, until you need some ground might help... but only if you want to destroy everyone's focus while you grind beans at top volume at random intervals!

Otherwise maybe ask the folks at work to buy smaller amounts of ground coffee so it won't get stale/sour, and keep it in the freezer?

cosmia

@frigwiggin OH GOD I LOVE OOLONG SO MUCH

ohmy

@frigwiggin We get Intelligentsia at work and it's still terrible. I think it's just that everyone always adds too many scoops and it ends up too dark and bitter. There is no quality control in office coffee.

harebell

@frigwiggin
I'm not a coffee expert, but coffee has oils, and they can go rancid if the coffee is too old. So maybe it's that.
And cheap coffee is often too old because, you know, sitting around in warehouses and grocery store shelves and just collecting the dust, so. Especially if it was pre-ground before getting packaged.
Have just grossed self out about coffee.
Enjoy your delicious peacefully fresh-brewed oolong!

Jizzcliner

@frigwiggin The coffee machine probably brews at too low of a temperature. Have you ever tried using an Aeropress? They're very portable and make passable coffee out of bad grounds by at least brewing correctly.

frigwiggin

@cosmia Meeee tooooo! I'm sitting here sniffing the aroma and feelin' happy right now.

frigwiggin

@all It's probably a combo of these things--it's definitely pre-ground, like the big red tub kind that sits around forever, and I have no idea how the main coffee-maker uses the machine so it may be a question of water amount/temp too. I've never tried an Aeropress because I usually just make myself tea, but I do like tasty coffee! I must think on this.

robotosaur

@PatatasBravas My work freezer makes everything taste vile, and none of the ice cubes are ever usable, so I recommend a does-this-freezer-taste-like-butt test before stashing coffee in there.

PatatasBravas

@robotosaur Oh definitely check if the freezer is going to make things yucky! Work kitchens are... terrifying.

@Frigwiggen If you want to step up the ground-coffee game a smidgen from alarming red buckets, you might coax people into getting Dunkin Donuts ground coffee.

I realize the coffee snobs will now descend upon me as dense as cicadas but far more bloodthirstily, so before I am carried off and bludgeoned to death with french presses... DD makes ground coffee that is actually pretty good for work purposes!

up cubed

@frigwiggin Do you have Trader Joes? The instant coffee is passable.
Question: for coffee in public places (offices), is the Aeorpress easy to clean and not too messy. I know a few people who have personal drip cones, which seem pretty clean and easy. A french press might be messy because all the grinds are stuck at the bottom of the pot and the glass canisters are so easy to break.

Homestar Runner

@frigwiggin The machine might also be dirty. After lunch one day (or whatever time won't cause panic if coffee is unavailable), run a water cycle through the machine. Basically you pretend you're making a pot of coffee, pour the water into the usual place, etc, but just leave out the actual coffee grounds.

If you're ever in the office on a weekend, you could add some vinegar to this water cycle, but it's too pungent to do when people are in the office.

Jizzcliner

@upupandaway It's a really good little device! The air pressure compresses the grounds into a puck, and you just unscrew the think that holds the filter in place and shoot the filter and grounds into the garbage. Then maybe rinse it a little, or wipe it.

I don't know if that makes sense, but here is a demonstration. He kind of muffs it up, but I like the video because I'd totally smoke up with him.

TheLetterL

@frigwiggin I can't personally vouch for this, so use at your own risk, but in a jam, my mother sometimes sprinkles in a little salt to counteract the bitterness of old coffee.

pharmakeus

@frigwiggin - my guess isn't that the coffee is brewed to COLD, but too HOT (or it's been sitting on a hot burner too long and gone stale or gotten burnt). This is why cold-brewed coffee usually tastes sweeter than conventionally-brewed coffee:
http://baristador.com/three-reasons-why-your-cup-of-coffee-tastes-bitter/

upsofloating

@TheLetterL I'm with your mom on this. I actually always brew my coffee with a pinch of salt, because it just tastes better. I promise.

Jizzcliner

@pharmakeus The rule of thumb is that sour is for underextracted, and bitter is for overextracted. You can have an unpleasant mixture of both if you heat underextracted coffee though. Drip coffee makers typically underheat the water, and distribute water over the bed of grounds unevenly (which is why expensive coffee makers like the Technivorm or the bonavita advertise more powerful heaters, and better sprinklerheads) and then pour that into a carafe on a hot-tin-plate.

I don't want to come across as too much of a coffee snob. I just really like good coffee, and had to learn how to make it when I didn't have money to buy it all of the time.

themmases

@Jizzcliner Thanks, this is actually really helpful/not snobbish at all! I've been noticing kind of a funky taste at the end of the coffee I buy lately (mostly cafeteria coffee that sits in those carafes, but it's a hospital so the coffee should turn over pretty quickly, you would think) and wondering if it's just me. I'm guessing it's probably the sour taste you're referring to. (Although if it is Starbucks, which for some reason cafeterias brag about having, then it is definitely bitter and heartburn inducing on top of the funk. Yum!)

Oddly, the dumb Keurig machines my office has make pretty good coffee. I bring in one of those Ekobrew things and my own coffee, and even if I used pre-ground stuff that is definitely lasting me more than 2 weeks, it's a million times better.

Jizzcliner

@themmases Professional coffee machines typically heat water to a high enough temperature, so that might not be the issue. But I find the source of funk is usually an issue freshness/cleanliness. Carafes are kind of hard to clean, and coffee leaves volatile oils that oxidize/go stale after a while.

This is also why most coffee aficionados advocate grinding your own coffee immediately before brewing: grinding increases the exposed surface area, greatly increasing the rate of oxidation that the beans undergo, so if you grind too far in advance, or the coffee brewing equipment is dirty (oils exposed to air become stale), the coffee will also taste stale or funky.

If I could prioritize the order of stuff to get nice coffee, I'd probably go

1.) Freshly, evenly ground coffee (Burr grinder)
2.) Proper brewing temperature, time and coffee to water ratio (this is where my aeropress comes in)
3.) Good beans

Like all things, you just have to decide how much effort, time and money you want to put in to get something good enough for you. I'm totally fine with Keurigs, but I'm really happy with how my morning coffee tastes, it takes less time than waiting at a cafe, and is way cheaper. There is a tonne of information available on the internet, but much of it is way too snobby. Coffee is a drink, not a religion. Everyone should just chill out.

themmases

@Jizzcliner Ooh, that makes sense. In that case I suppose the high turnover in our cafeteria could actually make it worse, since there's not going to be a ton of time to clean those properly.

I actually don't really like the Keurigs, but they're the only option in my office to not go buy coffee every time (one of the joys of non-profit work). When we moved offices, the bosses bought a bunch of them and it was heralded as this amazing gift... Then they never bought K-cups for them ever again (another joy of non-profit work, and of crappy management). If they hadn't done that, I would have snuck in an electric kettle and a French press. Sometimes I still think I should...

sony_b

@Jizzcliner Another vote for the Aeropress. I bought one as camping equipment and realized it made better coffee than my coffee maker or my french press. LOVE. And also great if you want to do Vietnamese style coffee with sweetened condensed milk. Which they now have squeeze bottles of at Trader Joe's so I might be drinking a lot of it these days.

PistolPackinMama

@frigwiggin Oh man. In my office area, the coffee is foul. FOUL. Bad coffee, stale, made in a Mr. Coffee pot which for some reason is The Brand of Death Coffee and makes the stuff taste burned and plastickey and oiley and terrible.

I am getting an Aeropress for my office, because I can't even.

Bookgerm

If you want to do some easy baking that is savory:
1. Roast vegetables! Just some olive oil and salt and pepper and vegetables and then you eat them right out of the oven.
2. Roast chicken! Roasting a whole chicken is remarkably easy, but if you are intimidated, there's a genre of baked chicken dishes that just involve mixing up a sauce, pouring it over chicken pieces (boneless skinless thighs are the cheapest, easiest, and most delicious, but breasts work too), and sticking it in an oven. This one is really easy and delicious, despite having a dumb name. http://www.wittyinthecity.com/2011/08/man-pleasing-chicken/

PatatasBravas

AND GENIUS IDEA

while you're roasting your chicken, put your root veg underneath it, so it roasts in the tasty dripping chicken fats! Ideally you slam some rosemary particles on those chickens and sprinkle some salt on the veg too.

anachronistique

@Bookgerm The other day I basically ate an entire pan of roasted asparagus like they were French fries.

Bookgerm

@PatatasBravas YES. Bird fat + root vegetables = bliss. (Not for the bird, obviously.)

frigwiggin

@Bookgerm I love roasting chickens, but all the recipes I've tried say to flip the bird partway through and the nice crispy skin always gets torn to shreds when I try this. Is there a better way? Is flipping really necessary?

cee
cee

@frigwiggin flipping is not strictly necessary - you're doing it to prevent the breast from cooking too quickly and drying out. other options: start with bird upside down, so when you flip you're not tearing the breast skin; shove loads of butter under the skin and baste a lot so the breast doesn't dry; judicious use of foil (might mess with yr crispy skin game tho).

PatatasBravas

@frigwiggin I've never flipped a roasting chicken, partly because I obsess about that delicious skin. My usual strategy is:

Rub that sucker with olive oil and salt on the skin and stuff the cavity with thyme, rosemary, and a wedge of lemon. Then I use the rest of the lemon for a drink!

450°F for 15 minutes, and then at 350°F for another hour-ish/until the juices run clear when you cut between a leg and thigh. Scatter veg in large chunks underneath the chicken to catch the drips.

DEVOUR

RoxxieRae

@anachronistique Ditto on broiled green beans (haricot verts). GAH so delicious.

par_parenthese

@anachronistique I have often stood over a pan of roasted asparagus (or brussels *swoon*) and eaten the whole thing. So so wonderful.

robotosaur

@Bookgerm The best for roasted vegetables is a drizzle of balsamic glaze to finish. So crazy good.

missupright

@frigwiggin I have recently got super into roast chicken, and I have discovered the easiest and deliciousest way of doing it!

You make up a sort of marinade- I use olive oil, salt, pepper, lemon juice, chopped garlic cloves + either (cumin seeds, honey, crushed chillies, maybe some mint, maybe some coriander) or (wholegrain mustard, thyme, rosemary).

Bird in roasting tray; rub all over with the marinade-thing- messy, but fine- and stuff the cavity with four garlic cloves, unpeeled, a lemon half or two, some herbs and things, and then stick in the oven at 180 degrees (centigrade) for about 70 minutes- but, obviously, YMMV when it comes to meat, and check it check it check it with a skewer because bad chicken is bad.

No need to turn it- the skin is *wonderful* and flavourful, and the meat stays really tender and juicy,
and it is my new favourite thing. So easy! So delicious! Dinner and lunch and stock!

pinniped

@anachronistique YES. Asparagus roasted with olive oil, sea salt, and a splash of lemon juice, then drizzled with mustard-garlic aioli from Trader Joe's. DONE.

Onymous

@frigwiggin Flipping is totally not necessary.

There's this whole culture of making roast-X harder than it actually is -see for instance the billion recipes on who to cook a turkey ever November- just shove it in the oven.

Briony Fields

@frigwiggin Throw some bacon on it! I never flip, I just put bacon on the chicken part way through. Keeps it from drying out and tastes AMAZING. Bacon is the duct tape of cooking.

BosomBuddy

@frigwiggin My trick is to roast chicken rotisserie-style. Put a can, or nearly empty can, of soda or juice into the cavity and stand it upright on a tray or saute pan that can go into the oven. I believe I roast it at a fairly high temperature (sorry, I can't remember, but anywhere between 400 and 450) until it's done. No turning, no losing of crispy skin.

HereComesTheMetricSystem

@all Also you can roast veg in a slow cooker? Haven't tried it yet but whenever I use the oven I just wind up burning (and also undercooking) whatever I'm trying to roast.

http://chocolatecoveredkatie.com/2013/01/10/how-to-roast-vegetables-in-the-slow-cooker/

hotdog

ok, but how do I actually *cook* the lentils? That was not answered. Do I soak them? Not soak them? Boil them? What kind of pan do I use? Someone else who is also depressed and too lazy to look this up on the internet wants to know. I mean, like, uh, a friend.

Porn Peddler

@hotdog I soak them for a little bit if I have time, but they don't strictly need it. Just put them in a pot with water, turn it on high til it's boiling, then lower the heat to a simmer and cover it.

SarahP

@hotdog I've never soaked lentils (except when I was sprouting them). @Porn Peddler's directions are the best! Oh, but I always partially cover mine because otherwise, for some reason, no matter how low the temperature, my lentils alllllways boil over.

Mae
Mae

@hotdog I never soak them, and they always turn out fine!

Emily Beyda

@hotdog Don't worry about soaking! Just put 'em in cold water and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer and throw in your salt. Any regular old sauce pan you have lying around will do nicely

Selene

@hotdog Lentils are my JAM. I usually don't soak them, but they'll cook faster if you do. So if it's something you can remember in the morning, dinner will be ready sooner! My favorite method is to chop up like a quarter of an onion and sautee it in butter or olive oil with salt, pepper, and cumin. Then I just put in the lentils and a bunch of water, add some more salt, and boil away with the lid half-on. If all the water boils off before the lentils are the right texture, I just put in some more. If they're too wet, you can take the lid off and turn up the heat a little to boil some water off.

Chopped tomatoes (canned or fresh) are a delicious addition right at the end. You can also boil pasta right in the lentils--just use a little extra water, and the pasta will pick up the delicious lentil flavor. You can throw in any vegetables you've got, really--sweet potatoes are especially good, and you can wilt spinach or arugula by putting in the bottom of the bowl, under your tasty hot lentils.

deathcabforcutes

@hotdog My favourite recipe is Braised Chicken with Lentils and Yogurt (http://www.tablefare.com/recipes/index.php?recipeID=102&n=Braised-Chicken-with-Lentils-and-Yogurt). I tried this first with red lentils and then with green lentils. They definitely come out a little different, but it's always so delicious!

cosmia

Oh god I am getting way too many food feels and tea feels about this. Can I write a column about tea questions?! I WORK AT A TEA SHOP AND AM A HUGE NERD, I AM QUALIFIED

harebell

@cosmia
yes, please!

ohmy

@cosmia That would be awesome!

dj pomegranate

@cosmia Do it do it do it! I have a question for you: how come when I get green tea in restaurants, it is delicious, but when I make it at home it is bitter and/or tangy? Am I just using cheap tea? Is my water too hot? Help me!

PatatasBravas

On second thought, I actually don't have any tea questions, because I have my habits and I like them. So maybe you could come up with tea-insider information? Tea secrets or tricks of the trade you have picked up? Most scarring tea tragedies?

cosmia

OH GOD OKAY I WANT THIS TO BE A THING. Do people want to email me their questions and then I can answer them and propose to our new benevolent overlord Emma (HI EMMA YOU'RE GREAT) that it be on the Pin? Seriously guys I love tea so much and I have so much random useless knowledge about steeping techniques and temperature and tasting notes and shit.

iceberg

@cosmia YES

frigwiggin

@cosmia I will! I have a question, I do I do I do.

cosmia

@dj pomegranate It could be a combination of those! I have made some passably good green tea out of leaves I bought for like a dollar a pound at the bulk food store, but water temperature and steeping time are super important. You should never steep green tea (especially if the leaves are more delicate and fresh looking, instead of the roasty, shriveled kind) in water hotter than around 75 C/167 F or for longer than around 4 minutes for the roasty, shriveled kind, or 2 minutes for the delicate kind. Fun fact! The green tea they serve at sushi restaurants is usually genmaicha, which is yummy and roasty tasting because it is made with Japanese sencha green tea (sweet and grassy and yum) mixed with roasted rice grains. They started doing this in Japan during a depression to make the tea last longer and essentially cutting it with a cheaper ingredient, but it ended up tasting amazing, so now it's a Thing.

cosmia

@PatatasBravas Oh dear lord I have so many of these stories

PatatasBravas

Tell me all of them. I will sit here clutching my mug of lapsang souchong and wait patiently.

cosmia

@everyone OKAY. I'm gonna give y'all my real email because whatever, it's The Hairpin: lauradigi90@gmail.com. If you have a tea question, email it and I will compile a few questions and answers together! If it's too dumb for a Pin submission, I will email you all back individually with your tea answer/random tea story/tea related whatever.

cosmia

@PatatasBravas The first one I can remember: some super natural, crazy organic teas have bits of plant matter or whatnot in them because they are processed very little. Check that shit before you drink it, because on more than one occasion we have found weird-looking sticks that were probably once part of a bug.

ETA: Lapsang souchong is deliciously amazing, and also you can totally marinate smoked salmon with it. Also weirdly good as an iced tea during a barbeque.

dj pomegranate

@cosmia Probably part of a CICADA!

PatatasBravas

YES ON ALL COUNTS

You have to write this column now, my soul craves it.

Amphora

@cosmia I drink Lapsang Souchong when it's too early for scotch.

dj pomegranate

@cosmia Thanks! I feel I am now on the path to a more enjoyable green tea experience!

Homestar Runner

@PatatasBravas

Tea tragedies = trageteas

mustelid

@cosmia FAVORITE MILK OOLONG RECOMMENDATION, GO. (Right now I am obsessed with DAVIDsTEA Quangzhou Milk Oolong.)

Also have any of you heard of Steepster? It is a tea social network thing I guess? But it is pretty great because it's been helping me a) keep track of my favorite steep time/temps for various teas I have (useful if I go against what's recommended on the package) and b) keep track of what teas I actually have in a virtual "tea cupboard," because man it is pretty easy to forget that stuff is there when it is buried in the back of my tea shelf.

thatgirl

@cosmia You should actually just record an ASMR-style video of yourself answering questions about tea.

cosmia

@thatgirl What if I just record the minute sounds tea leaves make scratching against each other in super hi-def

thatgirl

@cosmia Even. Better.

cosmia

@mustelid Yess I love Steepster! I use it for reviews when I'm not sure if I want to buy a certain tea. ALSO I LOVE DAVIDS MILK OOLONG. Are you in Canada? Teavana is hella pricey but their Four Seasons Oolong is unbelievably good, not a milk oolong per say but it has an amazing floral milky taste.

Briony Fields

@dj pomegranate I always cut some ginger into my green tea, and never steep for more than two minutes. It's very sweet and delicious.

Heat Signature

@cosmia I would support this. I had to stop drinking coffee a few months ago because of heart problems, and now drink tea exclusively. Husband and I are just starting to get into tea, and guidance is helpful.

Linette

@cosmia I WILL READ THIS SO HARD and also I will be sending you a question, because I do something to my tea that I'm pretty sure you're not supposed to do, but then it turns out amazing, and I very much want to know why.

Porn Peddler

yo, lentils and other beans should not be salted until they are done or nearly done cooking. They will get all tough and shitty and will take forever to cook if you add too much saltiness too soon. Also: onions and acidic things can do the same thing.

In large quantities, like making a gigantic pot of lentil soup, it doesn't matter too too much, but yeah. Facts about lentils.

stonefruit

@Porn Peddler Ayup. Salt inhibits the process by which legumes soften up in water. Always salt after cooking! Thus spaketh America's Test Kitchen and Alton Brown, I believe.

Saskquatch

@Porn Peddler Thank you! I feel better about rushing down here to say that! No salt! Also re: acidic things I tried to cook brown lentils in fresh tomatoes once and it. did. not. work. those little lentils might as well have been aquarium stones.

cee
cee

i was brought up with a vague sense that one was never to salt lentils while cooking, because it would do... something... bad... to the... texture?? Was this incorrect? Have I been living a lie? What is "enough salt" anyway?

Porn Peddler

@cee HAH! Brain sisters!

dj pomegranate

@cee I always just poouuuuur salt in when I cook lentils. They always taste fine! (Or maybe I just really like salt?)

cee
cee

@Porn Peddler I am glad you are with me, here, addressing the important questions.

Porn Peddler

@dj pomegranate What sort of lentil wizard are you?! Salt makes lentils go tough in the water! How long do you cook them/at what point do you add the salt?

dj pomegranate

@Porn Peddler I don't knowwwww! I guess I don't really pour, but I do use salt in the water. I usually put green/French lentils in a pot of water with like...1 or 2 tbs of salt. Then I boil for about 20 minutes, and then I add tomatoes and spinach and then it is soup! Maybe it makes them tough but I don't notice because I am busy eating my soup? I don't know. Now I want to experiment, though! Maybe I will love lentil soup even more after I stop adding salt.

bitzyboozer

@cee I think the deal with lentils (and beans in general) is that you can add salt but not until they're most of the way done cooking. The reason people say to not add any! salt! ever! is usually because they've added salt too early in the cooking process with disastrous results.

par_parenthese

@dj pomegranate @Porn Peddler Yeah I salt my lentils from the beginning 100% of the time and they turn out fine.

Porn Peddler

@par_parenthese lentil wizards. lentil wizards as far as the eye can see.

Emily Beyda

@cee I always bring them to a boil THEN add salt. It's great because it doesn't mess with the texture, but you still get the deep seasoning that comes from cooking in salt rather than adding it at the end. Lentil Wizards unite!

cee
cee

@Emily Beyda WAIT WAIT I HAVE SOME SCIENCE TO ADD TO THIS WIZARDRY

the question of cooking lentils turns out to be covered in Hervé This' Molecular Gastronomy - more specifically the question of cooking lentils in acidic vs basic water, as bicarbonate of soda is known to make lentils soften faster.

FINDINGS:
- basic water (i.e. water that is alkaline, e.g. with bicarbonate of soda added) makes lentils soften faster
- acidic water (e.g. with vinegar in) results in their retaining their hardness for aaaaages
- hard water (e.g. water in a limestone area, with calcium ions in it) also leaves lentils hard for ages
ALSO
- lentils cooked at a hard boil will soften fast but form a starchy paste
- lentils cooked at below 86 degrees C will soften but retain their form, however this takes longer

Salt doesn't affect the ph of water (and sodium ions don't behave like calcium ions), so it does not cover this specific question, but it might help with the general "why is this texture not what i want" issue. maybe it is a hard vs soft water thing!

(tho, for the record, the adding of too much bicarb of soda to cooking beans can make them taste kind of soapy and weird, so it might have a similarly adverse effect to the lentil.)

dj pomegranate

@cee You just won this whole thread.

Saskquatch

@cee You are my Lentil Reasearch Hero!

Linette

@Porn Peddler I want someone to make their name Lentil Wizard immediately.

(I always want someone else to do it. I want these names to exist, but I do not want to exist them.)

Tam
Tam

@Porn Peddler Maybe I'm too late for this, but the way I usually make lentils is:
1. Fry some onions with a bit of salt so they soften
2. Throw in some sausage / chorizo / ham / whatever. Not necessary
3. Put in lentils with a LOT of water. Like 4:1 ratio
4. Boil for some time (15 min maybe?)
5. Throw in some carrots / Ad more salt
6. Let everything soften
7. Throw in some spinach, let it wilt and turn off. Ad more salt if necessary.

They've never come out hard, or maybe I've been eating tough lentils all my life o_o

phillystout

Totally making Depression Spaghetti for lunch.

Probs

@phillystout icon related.

phillystout

@Probs *high five*

And it was ridiculously delicious, now I'm off to read nerdy books in the yard.

SarcasticFringehead

@phillystout I may end up thanking my husband in my thesis acknowledgements for "acknowledging that the fish were dead," which will be weird for everyone else, but seriously, I needed that.

NevilleLongbottom

Blitz Kuchen?

stonefruit

@NevilleLongbottom probably, but doesn't a cake made entirely of blintzes sound wonderful?

NevilleLongbottom

@stonefruit Yes, all cake is wonderful. Well, except cake with coconut. I can't abide by coconut. Or those cakes that have a gelatinous top layer that seem to be quite popular in Germany. Not. Okay.

Jinxie

Hey, LW3 - you could also make Chocolate Stuff, which is basically the same thing as what Emily said to do, only with cocoa powder added. It's amazing, for realzies.

Emby

Oh I don't know, maybe freaking learn how to love black coffee, like champions do?

frigwiggin

@Emby Isn't quality coffee kind of important for that, though? If all you've got is so-so coffee, you've gotta doctor it up to make it drinkable. Or just be a grizzled truck driver.

frigwiggin

@Emby I may be biased because I've never bought and made coffee on my own and the coffee my coworkers brew tastes like bile.

Emby

@frigwiggin It's not the taste I'm into, usually, it's mining that black gold for the sweet, sweet caffeine and wake-up properties.

Frankly, I'd pit grizzled journalists against grizzled truck drivers in a coffee drink-off any day of the week. There have been weeks when I've realized literally the only liquids I've consumed have been coffee and beer.

I'm gross.

up cubed

@Emby Black and bitter, like my soul. My office has Peets coffee, which tasted like burnt black syrup when I started, but now tastes deliciously normal.

laurel

@Emby Black coffeee

Slapfight

@Emby I can't! I've tried, but I just...can't. I can do sans sugar, but there has to be some sort of dairy type product for me. I AM WEAK AND A FAILURE!

bnna

@Slapfight I usually drink my coffee black, but I just put some nutella in because why not? its my second cup so I'm getting fancy and experimental! anyways its not really dissolving and kind of tastes the same, but I'm still going to drink it!

Faintly Macabre

@Slapfight Same here. I recently went to a pretentious cafe where there was no milk in sight and there was a sign warning people not to dare put sugar in their coffee. The coffee was actually quite good, but I spent the entire time drinking it looking wildly around the room for where milk might be hiding. (I didn't want to get kicked out for asking the barista.) Maybe I should go back with some aspartame and powdered milk, just to piss them off. I WILL DRINK MY COFFEE HOW I WANT.

PistolPackinMama

@Faintly Macabre Was my coffee made by someone with three of those beaker things you use to coffee + grounds to a foam and then subside, then pour it off, then again in the medium one? Then the small one? Is the resulting product that delicious bitter thick brew that has the viscosity of motor oil?

Does my coffee have cardamom and whatever else you put in Turkish coffee?

Is it made in Brazil by someone who knows how to get that syrupy sweet texture of sugary goodness in the very, very, very strong brew?

Was is made in a super-fance restaurant by someone who really knows how to use an espresso maker?

No? It has none of these?

I'll be pouring some really nice cream or half and half in there, then, thanks.

annecara

but

but

what size pan? round or square? what temperature should you heat the oven to?

cee
cee

@annecara 200 degrees centigrade (400f?) for pie, 175 degrees centigrade (350F?) for cake.

pan shape and size don't matter much: whatever will take the ingredients you have (if cake, you want your tin to be like 3/4 full or so)

Emily Beyda

@annecara I forget that not everyone has a crapy old oven that has one temperature setting and needs manual lighting! 350 degrees will do nicely for most baked goods, and you can use whatever pans you have lying around. Even muffin pans if you wanna do lightning cupcakes; just make sure to reduce the cooking time!

Ophelia

@Emily Beyda I read a fascinating article recently about baking temps - basically, everything needs to bake at either low (275-300F), medium (350-375), or high (400-425) - generally, things fall into categories, so cakes are medium, pies/pastries are high, pudding-y things are low.

Oven temp dials are still a relatively new thing, but most are not accurate anyway, so as long as you generally follow the low-med-high guidance, you'll probably be fine.

area@twitter

GLUTTON! Thank you! I am going to attempt a red lentil recipe my awesome Indian coworker gave to me and I am so nervous I'll screw it up. I like to think of myself as a reasonably talented cook, but I'm new to lentils. And there are deglazing steps. HALP.
Can we get some kind of Idiot's Guide to making delicious beans? I am trying to eat more beans but I have never cooked much with them before. But they're so cheap and healthy! Bean me up, 'Pinners.

aphrabean

@area@twitter Beans are glorious, and the most important factor (to my mind) are the beans themselves. Check out some heirloom varieties! Rio Zape are my hands-down favorite, and you just cook them with a couple of bay leaves in plenty of water, and then salt them appropriately once they're done, and then you can do anything yo want with them. Breakfast: over brown rice with plenty of salsa and some roasted veggies and a fried egg. Well, I eat this for dinner, too, all the time. It's amazing.

PatatasBravas

These fifteen are solid recipes

and get a used copy of The Moosewood Cookbook and that should get you started.

par_parenthese

@area@twitter Buying from a place with high bean turnover (like an Indian grocery) is CRUCIAL. If those beans are old, they will never cook, no matter how long you soak/simmer. And just as a bonus, my favorite red lentil recipe, which I made up and which may well break all the rules of Indian cookery, but which tastes delicious:

Saute in ghee or oil:
1 onion until brown. Add
2-3 cloves of garlic, whole,
1" piece of fresh ginger, whole. Saute until fragrant, then add a spoonful each:
turmeric and
coriander, and half a spoonful each of
cumin seeds and
red pepper flakes, and stir around until fragrant.

Dump in:
2 cups red SPLIT lentils, washed and picked over
water or broth just to cover
1 can coconut milk
1 can diced tomatoes

Simmer until soft and cooked through. Serve with rice.

Emily Beyda

@area@twitter That recipe sounds amazing; hope the lentil breakdown helps! If you need any specific advice, feel free to write in. And don't worry about deglazing; it sounds fancy, but all it really is is slooping a few tablespoons of liquid or fat around in a hot pan to help dislodge the delicious crusty aromatic bits!

Faintly Macabre

@area@twitter Open can, dump can in pot with other ingredients. That is my recipe for cooking beans.

(Though on a more serious note, my family makes vegetarian fake chili with lots of beans, carrot, red pepper, onion, garlic, lots of mushrooms, tomato paste, and tons of cumin and black pepper. It requires a lot of chopping but is otherwise the easiest thing ever.)

teaandcakeordeath

Are there any other pasta wizards out there who have super easy recipes?

I make a really really easy sauce which is just passatta, capers, olives (stuffed with garlic), oregano and basil in a pan for a few minutes without any intervention or skill (except stirring) and it tastes goood.
(The store by my house sells these things which makes it easier)

teaandcakeordeath

@teaandcakeordeath
I really love A Glutton. Is it gluttonous to as for more A Glutton?

robotosaur

@teaandcakeordeath I make alfredo pasta with wilted greens and basil and sauteed or steamed broccolini. Not exactly heart-healthy but super easy.

Bookgerm

@teaandcakeordeath I love this smitten kitchen recipe, which is just spaghetti, olive oil, butter, cheese, and pepper. You just boil up the spaghetti, and then put it in a pot with hot oil, then add the butter and cheese and pepper. http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2010/02/spaghetti-cacio-e-pepe/

Emby

@teaandcakeordeath Can I share a recipe instead that was NOT very good? In college, before I knew anything about cooking, I was also poor and didn't have many ingredients in my pantry. So I mixed together bleu cheese dressing, almonds, dried basil and oregano and made a "sauce", and then put it over spaghetti. And ate like 2 bites and threw that mess in the garbage.

LilRedCorvette

@teaandcakeordeath Orzo* salad! chunks of bell pepper, red onion, capers, olives, feta, sundried tomatoes, basil, olive oil, sea salt if, like me, you are a damn dirty ape. Upon reflection, you could probably throw some bacon in there, too. Serve cold, or eat hot because WHO'S GOT TIME TO WAIT FOR ORZO SALAD TO COOL (not me)

*Can be made with a substitute carb of your choice if, say, you realize you only have spaghetti in your house but have been drinking all afternoon and cannot go to the grocery store,

par_parenthese

@teaandcakeordeath Pasta, lots of garlic, fresh spinach, crumbled-up feta, chopped olives, lots of olive oil, red pepper flakes, pasta water to hold it all together.

MmeLibrarian

@teaandcakeordeath Preheat oven to 400/425F. Place all of the broccoli on a sheet pan, drizzle with olive oil, season with salt. While broccoli roasts, boil water and cook up some penne or other tube pasta. When the broccoli is close to done, add a chopped shallot to the roasting pan. When the broccoli appears to have been roasted within an inch of its life and the shallots are browned, toss the whole deal together in a bowl with more olive oil, some balsamic, and crushed red pepper. Sprinkle with cheese. Omg.

frigwiggin

@teaandcakeordeath My go-to pasta is carbonara, which I guess isn't SUPER easy since you have to cook the bacon and crumble it and then add it to the eggs and cheese and minced garlic, but once you've got it down it's sort of mechanical. And it's DELICIOUS oh my god I want some for dinner tonight.

thelittledeath

@teaandcakeordeath - Usually I just do butter with Pecorino Romano, but I'll be fixing this tonight:
http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-spaghetti-with-mascarpo-76811

par_parenthese

@frigwiggin OHHHHH CARBONARA. I don't do garlic in mine, though, which makes it easier (less chopping). I got it to a science before I cut back on grains. It's still my favorite pasta thing, though.

@Bookgerm Cacio e pepe is my SECOND favorite pasta thing. It is amaaaaaazing.

upsofloating

@teaandcakeordeath Fry up a couple of anchovy fillets and a couple of cloves of garlic and then add the sauce you already make. You've got yourself puttanescha! I swear it doen't taste like fish it just tastes like amazing. Also, everytime I cook it I get to yell "WHORE PASTA!" and laugh incredibly loud at myself. I eat this in bed because Whore Pasta.

PatatasBravas

The Lazy Potato fallback pasta sauce is a tab of butter, plus one peeled garlic clove, let it melt and infuse. Grate as much parmesan as you can bear while the pasta boils. Toss the pasta around to let it get lightly coated in garlic butter, discard that garlic lump onto a piece of toast and then into your mouth, then you roll the pastas around in the parm until they collect all the parm into their crevices.

Then you discard THAT into your mouth, preferably with a fork, but if all your forks are in the dishwasher then all bets are off.

pinniped

@teaandcakeordeath My lazy night indulgence is cooked rotini or farfalle stirred with butter, a splash of olive oil, parmesan cheese, garlic, salt, and pepper. Add more or less of each ingredient until the texture is gooey and riiiight. My more official, dinner-ish version involves adding feta and spinach.

teaandcakeordeath

@upsofloating
Ha! My sauce is a puttanesca without the anchovies as I cant bear anchovies. I think of it as 'Bastardized Whore's Pasta' as then I get two offensive(ish) words in one!
Ohh I forgot, add chilli powder to my recipe too.

@All
This is the best thread I've ever instigated!

Emily Beyda

@teaandcakeordeath THANK YOUU! Also, I kind of feel like we need to get some kind of crazy pasta wizard secret society going; you guys all have excellent ideas

upsofloating

@teaandcakeordeath We should be standing next to each other while cooking and I could point at you and yell "bastard!" and you could point at me and yell "whore" and then we could throw ourselves into our respective piles of carby goodness and then joy.

RNL
RNL

@Bookgerm Now that's depression eating.

katiemcgillicuddy

@teaandcakeordeath I sautee and onion and a few cloves of garlic in olive oil, cook that til the onions are translucent, blanch a ton of fresh tomatoes (of multiple varieties) add them to the sauteed onions and cook that for about 15 minutes, add a bit of red pepper flakes and a handful of fresh basil and some parmesan and let it cook a few more minutes. I use an immersion blender to blend it up, depending on how I'm feeling (I kind of dig a full blend). I cook up some angel hair pasta, maybe add a bit of pasta water and voila. It is perfect, there is no better sauce on the planet, the end. Salt and pepper to taste.

Note: What you can also do is make some infused olive oil using basil, garlic, whatever you want, and use that to saute your garlic and onions in. Not necessary by any means, but not a bad idea.

Amphora

@teaandcakeordeath 28oz can of San Marzano (or faux marzano) tomatoes, 3 tbs of butter, bit of salt, and a whole onion chopped in half. Simmer until you can't bear to smell it any more because you're too hungry and then serve on top of spaghetti without the onion (and if you're me, just eat the onion over the sink as soon as it cools enough because onions are the greatest)

thelittledeath

@Amphora - This is the basic red sauce that I fix, plus tons of garlic. Also, top with ricotta and fresh basil to really make it fancy and delicious. LOVE ricotta on pasta.

harebell

@teaandcakeordeath
olive oil, start some red pepper flakes in there, chopped fresh garlic, then add chopped cherry tomatoes and pitted chopped kalamata olives, salt, then add in your cooked pasta (preferably penne) and you're good to go! The juices are SO GOOD.

Slapfight

@teaandcakeordeath I boil some sort of pasta, then sauté some garlic and broccoli rabe, mix that together with salt, fresh ground pepper, olive oil and lemon juice, sprinkle on some parmesan and call it a night. A good one at that.

bitzyboozer

@Amphora I have made a similar recipe except I'm pretty sure it called for an entire stick of butter. And as weird as that made me feel, it was freaking delicious.

trappedinabay

@teaandcakeordeath
1) Keep your freezer stocked with bags of frozen gnocchi. They're like a dollar or two at the store, so stock up.
2) Boil those fuckers. And pop open a bottle of vino.
3) While they're boiling, throw some butter in a pan with sage (can be whole dried leaves, can be ground, can be fresh if you're fancy) and brown the butter (be careful not to burn it--you want a caramelly brown, nutty flavor).
4) Drain the gnocchi, then toss them in the browned sage butter and top with your favorite cheese (grated parmesan is my fave, but pecorino romano will do nicely as well)
5) Profit!

You can also mix whatever vegetable you like / have on hand into the gnocchi, if you're feeling the need to lighten things up. Sauteed mushrooms are lovely, and any sort of chopped/sauteed green thing is acceptable.

trappedinabay

@frigwiggin If you save your bacon grease (which, of course, everyone should--that stuff is GOLD), you can take a carbonara shortcut by just melting a glob of it and tossing the pasta in that. You won't have bacon crumbles, but you'll get the flavor, and it shaves a good 10 minutes off the cooking time.

trappedinabay

@teaandcakeordeath Also, I think frozen pierogies count as pasta? There are two schools of thought when it comes to a box of Mrs. T's. Mr. Trappedinabay prefers to boil them and eat them with dollops of sour cream, using a fork and knife like a civilized person. I prefer to fry them in butter until their little pasta skins are crispy, salt and pepper them within an inch of their lives, and eat them with my fingers. This often results in burned fingers, but I can't help myself.

Amphora

@trappedinabay OOh brilliant idea for all this bacon grease in my fridge! Thanks Log Lady!

frigwiggin

@trappedinabay Ooh, I've got another one! Garlic butter noodles are amaaaaazing. Sweet, savory, garlicky, throw whatever veg you want in there, maybe some shrimp, and JEAH.

Li'l Sebastian

@Amphora Seconded, this is the best possible of all pasta sauces and I make it like once a week.

Mame16th

@LilRedCorvette This, plus I usually add a can of drained and rinsed chick peas for protein. Also celery and/or cucumber are good.

cupcakecore@twitter

@teaandcakeordeath olive oil, garlic, salt, crush red pepper flakes, pureed tomatoes, pasta done.

I have a more complicated recipe which involves onions and many cloves of garlic but it's a little fussy, also it's called "kiss of death" pasta because it makes your breath so stinky.

Dancercise

Late to the party, but my favorite quick and easy pasta dish is...

Boil up some pasta: fusilli, gemelli, farfalle, and penne are good options.
Cook up some onion and garlic in olive oil. Add some oregano (fresh or dried). Dump in a can of garbanzo beans and however much balsamic vinegar you like. And salt and pepper too, I guess. Cook it until it's time to drain the pasta.

Combine everything (with some pasta water to keep things together if you want) and throw on a couple giant handfuls of spinach or kale or chard or something if you're so inclined. Stir it around until the greens wilt from the warm pasta and beans.

Basically, do whatever you want as long as you combine garbanzos, pasta, and balsamic. The rest is just extras.

teaandcakeordeath

@upsofloating
ahahahah I love this idea. BASTARD! WHOOOORE!
For some reason the You say potato, I say potato song is coming to mind.

@Emily Beyda
I would totally join the crazy pasta wizard secret society - and thanks again for the post!

Rookie (not the magazine) (not that there's anything wrong with that)

@frigwiggin My carbonara maybe less time-consuming than that? Separate the eggs, and try to leave the yolks whole because you're not clueless like me. Cut up the bacon with some kitchen scissors and fry it while the pasta is cooking. Don't drain the pasta like really hardcore, because a bit of humidity will be good (and might evaporate on its own anyway.) Stir the bacon and egg whites into the pasta until the whites are cooked. Add tons of parmesan and some fresh ground pepper. Put it in your plate and drop a yolk on top. Then you can smush up the yolk and eat your pasta and it is delicious.

One easy and healthy (but messy) pasta recipe I like is sausage and broccoli pasta. I steam some pieces of broccoli just a little bit and broil some Italian sausage, taking it out of the broiler before it's fully cooked. Then I cut up the sausages and finish cooking them by frying them up in some oil with garlic and chili flakes. Add the broccoli in at the last second, then mix all of that with pasta.

MissT123

I'm from the midwest, so one of the easiest things I like to do when I'm low on energy for any reason is pasta salad. You can make it with all the most fun pasta shapes, like bowties or rotini or shells...

Just boil the pasta and then toss with your favorite salad dressing (I like Marzetti's garlic Italian; I think I've had a tasty version with Catalina before). Stir in some kind of low-effort source of protein--chickpeas, canned crab, tuna (then it's headed in a Salade Nicoise direction, depending on what dressing you use)--add any veggies you like, steamed while the pasta cooks, or raw if it's something like chopped carrots and celery or olives. Season however you like: basil, red pepper flakes? So easy!

Make enough to have the next day, and you won't even need to heat it up after it's been in the fridge overnight, because pasta salad!

Good luck, LW2; take care of yourself! Have a spoonful of Nutella for dessert.

iceberg

OK this is a good feature though! But for real if you are depressed just make ramen, add the flavor packet, drain them, put them in a bowl, and throw some "sprinkle cheese" (Bergy Bits name for shredded/grated cheddar cheese) in there and stir it all in until the noodles are coated with cheese.

I do this every Saturday right after the last Bergy Bit falls asleep at nap time, it's (cheesy) balm to the soul right when I'm completely shattered.

cosmia

@iceberg Also, adding sriracha makes me feel fancy and cultured and experimental about my ramen!

iceberg

@cosmia I suppose you could add some frozen veg in with the noodles if you feel like you need more nutrients...

planforamiracle

@iceberg ALSO PUT A FRIED EGG ON THE RAMEN <3 <3 <3 If you eat eggs that is. I like keeping a little of the flavour packet broth.

sophia_h

@iceberg Two favorite lazy noodle recipes:

Hot:
- Boil spaghetti, put butter and shredded Parmesan on top (or olive oil instead of butter)

Cold:
- Boil water, put in soba noodles, take them out immediately, rinse under cold water, pour sweet chili sauce or Sriracha over, top with cold salad shrimp and grate a carrot over it (really good on gross summer days)

planforamiracle

@iceberg if you feel the need to add veggies, I heartily recommend kale, bok choy, or other greens, sauteed all nice and garlicky.

pinniped

@planforamiracle I recently started poaching an egg in the water while the ramen cooks and it makes the texture of the noodles amazing!

iceberg

@iceberg oh and if you're not vego a tiny can of tuna or salmon stirs in nicely for proteiny goodness.

iceberg

@iceberg OH AND i used to make this when I was single - cook some pasta, meanwhile, in a saucepan, a bit of olive oil, a crushed clove of garlic, then add& brown some minced beef, chuck in a can of tomatoes, then when pasta is done drain pasta and stir everything all together.

OR cook some pasta, drain it, while it's still hot crack an egg into it and stir it up, also some shredded cheese.

Ophelia

@iceberg also, cottage cheese is weirdly good on ramen.

Mame16th

@iceberg I like shredded iceberg (as it happens) lettuce in my ramen, or any other green if I'm being fancy. Then I top it with chopped or julienned cucumber according to laziness. Another good thing is to throw in a handful of broccoli slaw mix when you put the noodles in the water. 2 or 3 minutes is just enough to cook it slightly.

PistolPackinMama

@iceberg The flavor packets of ramen make me puke my guts up. After I learned this sad fact by experience, I discovered that using water, adding greens, then draining the noodles and adding olive oil, feta, pepper, and red pepper flakes is also good.

Slutface

Cook some noodles, shake some soy sauce over it, mix in a spoonful of peanut butter. EAT.

par_parenthese

@Slutface YES. Perfect depression food. (Also, if brain chemistry cooperates, an egg or two, some sri racha, and frozen peas.)

fondue with cheddar

@Slutface My depression pasta is macaroni with tomato sauce, macaroni with brown gravy, and macaroni with extra virgin olive oil and romano cheese. I alternate so I won't feel as terrible about myself.

trappedinabay

@Slutface Wait. Soy sauce and peanut butter? Into regular spaghetti noodles?

Slutface

@trappedinabay Yup.

Angry Panda

@Slutface I just made this last night for the first time with udon noodles and sugar peas! So good!

I'm Right on Top of that, Rose

@Slutface I used to cook that on camping trips, and we'd even add a dash of brown sugar. It. Was. Scrumptious.

fondue with cheddar

Lentils.

SarcasticFringehead

@fondue with cheddar We watch this movie every Christmas, adding our own commentary, and it is amazing every time.

fondue with cheddar

@SarcasticFringehead It is a must-see at least once a year. Headbutt!

SarcasticFringehead

@fondue with cheddar "polar" "bear"

fondue with cheddar

@SarcasticFringehead I may just have to watch it tonight.

Dancercise

@fondue with cheddar
Just when I thought I couldn't love you more.

fondue with cheddar

@Dancercise OH GAWRSH :)

SarcasticFringehead

@fondue with cheddar

...and now I have the singalong stuck in my head

planforamiracle

Dear glutton, may we please have a recipe/directions for the rice, onions, and brown lentils like your Sephardic great grandmother used to make?

MmeLibrarian

@planforamiracle Seconded. I would also like to know why I don't have a giant bowl in front of me right now.

Homestar Runner

@planforamiracle I suspect she's talking about mujaddara or similar: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/mujaddara-arabic-lentil-rice/

It's a million times more delicious than it looks. I always make way more onions than the recipe calls for--I usually want more anyway, and it never hurts to have spare caramelized onions in the fridge.

Edit: bonus points if you have sour cream or plain Greek yogurt around to top it with. OMGGGGG

planforamiracle

@Homestar Runner ooo thank you! I will give it a try.

JanieS

@planforamiracle Mujaddara is the best and everyone should eat it all the time. One time I tried to make it with the wrong kind of lentils, so everything turned to mush, but that MUSH WAS STILL THE TASTIEST.

This is my new username

@Homestar Runner Mmmmmmm, I think I am maybe going to make this for dinner tonight.

Emily Beyda

@planforamiracle Yes! Email me, and I will send you my grandma's super easy and awesome recipe. It is very delicious, and best served with yoghurt cucumber sauce.

Alexmen

I will send you my grandma's super easy and awesome recipe. It is very delicious, and best served with yoghurt cucumber sauce.....List on MLS

par_parenthese

My depression go-to before I cut back on grains was always fake risotto. I'd make a big pot of rice at the beginning of the week (or a rice-cooker full of rice) and then later in the week, scoop some out, pop it in a pan with some chicken bouillon and/or white wine, cheese, and frozen peas or spinach or a spoonful of canned pumpkin or whatever else I felt like putting in it. Took five minutes tops and was a big steaming bowl of comforting.

fondue with cheddar

@par_parenthese Brilliant. I'm a terrible cook, but I can totally do that.

laurel

@par_parenthese This sounds far more reliable than most risotto. Most risotto, unless the chef is some sort of savant, turns to undifferentiated mush.

par_parenthese

@laurel Yeah, it works kind of bizarrely well? And the cheaper the rice the better it worked IME. None o'yer fancy carnaroli here, thank ya.

upsofloating

@par_parenthese Also, with that big batch of cooked rice? Fried rice. Onions, chopped and frozen, with a few scoops of the rice, whatever frozen greens you want (PEAS! PEAS ARE THE BEST THING!), fry it for a few minutes while you find salt, pepper, chili flakes, crack a couple of eggs over it, stir until the eggs are cooked to your liking and then eat out of the pan because seriously dishes are the worst.

par_parenthese

@upsofloating YES! I was going to say that, but forgot! I had fried rice at least once or twice a week. Tons of ginger, always, and tons of chili flakes -- clears the head.

upsofloating

@par_parenthese GINGER! YES! Ginger makes things SO MUCH BETTER.

Jinxie

@upsofloating The last time I ordered Indian food, they accidentally gave me double the rice and so as not to waste it, I made Indian-ish fried rice for breakfast every day and felt like a damn rock star.

Ophelia

@upsofloating And arroz con leche! Really easy/yummy rice pudding. Take your already-cooked rice, and stick it in a saucepan with milk and sugar, and cook it until it becomes really starchy/puddingy. Add raisins/cinnamon/coconut/whatever you want. Devour.

Miss Maszkerádi

I dare say the Pin has returned to its former glory. Yay!

Emily Beyda

Awwww thanks dude! So glad you liked it!

Ophelia

@Miss Maszkerádi Gluttons + Miraculous Anteaters? Sign me up.

PistolPackinMama

@Ophelia exactly.

jason049

LW3 - baked ziti! Or, dedicate one a day every week or month to cook bulk food(OAMC). From personal experience of both depression styles in LW2, this may also be helpful.

thelittledeath

LW3 - baked ziti! Or, dedicate one a day every week or month to cook bulk food(OAMC). From personal experience of both depression styles in LW2, this may also be helpful.

sophia_h

This is the best lentil soup recipe, period. I make it with red lentils (rinsed and picked over, not soaked) and I finally bought grains of paradise after years of making it but the reviews have lots of substitution suggestions, like cloves and a little cayenne. It lasts for days, is good with Parmesan and thick bread, is vegan, is the best.

Dancercise

@sophia_h
PREACH.

That soup is my go-to winter soup. I make it at least twice a month from September to February, and it's now a family Thanksgiving staple.

sophia_h

@Dancercise yes, yes, all through the cold weather. My husband loves it, we eat for days off it for pennies, and I love making it for a crowd.

sarah girl

But see, this can't be depression food because these recipes require groceries, and groceries require leaving the house, and leaving the house requires getting off the couch and ugh.

In my worst depths of depression, in my rare trips to the grocery store I would buy a case of Ensure protein shakes, because all I could handle was opening the fridge and sometimes not even that. Thankfully, I'm a lot better now.

SarahP

@sarah girl My depression hunger monologue: ugh what is that feeling in my stomach oh it's hunger I have to eat too? ugh let's see what's in the fridge of course there is nothing in the fridge because I can't even be a person long enough to get food I am a failure ugh back to the couch to cry
**five minues later**
ugh what is that feeling in my stomach...
(repeat ad infinitum)

fondue with cheddar

@SarahP Mine is more like: i'm pretty hungry i should eat something but there's nothing i'm in the mood for that doesn't require cooking and i don't feel like cooking maybe i'll just have some chips oh but the kitchen is so far away* i'll just skip lunch and wait until boyfriend comes home and he'll make dinner for both of us ugh why am i so terrible i don't deserve him

*in the next room

fondue with cheddar


credit: Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal smbc-comics.com

area@twitter

@sarah girl There was a (mercifully brief) period in college when I was so nauseous from anxiety that all I could eat were plain garlic breadsticks (not the soft pizza kind, the long thin crunchy kind). Thanks, Alessi's.

iceberg

@sarah girl yeah, that's why i put my ramen comemnt because while the recipe sounds lovely, it requires a fair bit more effort than a depressed person might be willing to make. I also submit that grilled cheese sandwiches and microwaved canned tomato soup could be a depression dinner.

fondue with cheddar

@iceberg My boyfriend bought a giant brick of cheddar cheese, so that supplemented with something else (usually chocolate) has been my go-to depression dinner of late.

When you say grilled cheese and tomato soup is a depression dinner, you mean economic, right? Because while a depressed person might want to eat it they probably wouldn't want to make it. Unless grilled cheese = a slice of cheese melted on top of a slice of bread in the toaster oven. But it is a very economical meal.

Hot Doom

@sarah girl Ensure is such a good idea here. I will say, when I was at my most depressed, I (thankfully) had someone to take me to the market. I wasn't in too deep, so I knew certain things that would distract me, and that was mainly through baking. My ultimate happy place when I was depressed was making coconut cake (for my birthday!) and eating half of it over two days and freezing the rest for other low days. The other thing I made was chocolate chip cookies. Again, I relied on someone else to be able to come out with me and help me shop, but if I just repeated "butter. more butter, flour, chocolate" that was enough to keep me stocked for when I needed distraction and food. Cookies and cake count as a food group, obvs.

iceberg

@fondue with cheddar grilled cheese = cheese melted on top of one slice of bread under the broiler (toast the other side of the bread under the broiler first). ADVANCED METHOD: put another piece of bread in the toaster at the same time, and slap that piece of toast on top when the cheese is melted enough.

fondue with cheddar

@Hot Doom Peanut butter blended with raw honey with cappings, eaten with a spoon. Protein, carbs, vitamins, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and delicious. Also good over ice cream.

SarcasticFringehead

@sarah girl Fortunately(?), when I get really depressed, I don't get that hungry. I'll eat breakfast because I do that every day, and lunch because I'm at work and it's a thing to do that's not working, and other than that...I mean, last month there was a week where all I had for dinner was cheez-its and cherry jelly beans.

fondue with cheddar

@iceberg To me it's not grilled cheese without frying. The crispy, buttery bread makes it.

fondue with cheddar

@SarcasticFringehead I'm inclined to say it's fortunate because I tend to gain weight when I'm depressed. It's not because I eat more but because I make poorer choices. Cheez-its and cherry jelly beans...what is it about sweet/salty combos when you're depressed? I eat stuff like that all the time. Sharp cheese and chocolate, tortilla chips and ice cream, salted pretzels and marshmallows...how many of you do this?

fondue with cheddar

It seems like a lot of us suffer (or have suffered) from depression, and even those who aren't prone to it probably know people who are. I think more depression-related content would be helpful to a lot of people.

Smallison

@fondue with cheddar

I totally do this. My problem is balance though. Like, I'll eat some chocolate, then I want potato chips, but then I need the sweet again. And so on.

fondue with cheddar

@Smallison Yeah, me too. Until one of them runs out or I expect someone to come home, because I don't want them to realize how terribly I'm eating.

Hot Doom

@fondue with cheddar You are on to something here with depression-related content here. I think that's a great idea, if only to provide a touch-point with first-person stories for people to identify with.

Though, I have to say, I am all about the fatty and unctuous and starchy with depression food. I want it olive-oily and I want it greasy and salty so pasta alla olio is perfect. Blaaaahhhhhhhhhh.

fondue with cheddar

@Hot Doom I can go either way with oil when I'm depressed. I love the taste, but if I haven't taken a shower (which is likely) my skin and hair get really oily. I feel so gross that I can't fathom the thought of eating something oily.

SarcasticFringehead

@Hot Doom Fatty/starchy is definitely where I go when I'm depressed but not quite to the crackers & candy stage - specifically, a baked potato with butter, cheddar cheese, sour cream, and lawry's salt (no other seasoned salt will do!). What you do is you eat the peel first and then mash everything else up into a disgusting, transcendent potato/dairy/salt mess and then stuff it in your face.

fondue with cheddar

@everyone MY PEOPLE <3

PistolPackinMama

@all my brother once in the depths of the worst depression ate

1) M&Ms heated in the bag on a radiator so he'd have something melty and hot.

2) 25 year old (yes, that is right, they were made ca. 1980) MREs (military field rations). My dad had them lying around. They're freeze dried. They are supposed to last that long.

He said the chicken cacciatore was the least disgusting.

I was depressed enough at the time to think these seemed like really good solutions to the hunger problem.

Also, cheese melted on Triscuits in the microwave.

fondue with cheddar

@PistolPackinMama My dad was a Marine, and he would bring home MREs all the time. This was also the 80's. I ate some of them, but all I remember are the hot dogs and the crackers (which, in hindsight, were probably matzo) and the teeny bottles of tabasco.

Cheese melted on Triscuits sounds pretty great, depressed or not.

franceschances

@sarah girl Chocolate covered pretzels! Those were my salty sweet depression jam.

fondue with cheddar

@franceschances I recently discovered these...

does it need saying

@fondue with cheddar I need to know where you found these. I feel like they might be my soul mate.

fondue with cheddar

@does it need saying Wegmans! They are my soul mate too, but I'm willing to share. They're in the section of the snack aisle where you find stuff like Chex Mix. Speaking of which, have you tried the dark chocolate Chex Mix? LOOK AT THIS SHIT

robotosaur

LW2--roast some chickpeas. This is my go-to snack/meal. Drain and rinse a can of chickpeas, dry on paper towels, toss with Lawry's seasoned salt, roast in 425 degree oven for ~30 minutes. Then you can eat the whole bowl while you watch Netflix and drink wine. (Feel free to be fancier with the salt/seasoning--I sometimes use za'atar or similar--but with Lawry's, the flavor reminds me of Chicken McNuggets and that soothes my soul.)

par_parenthese

@robotosaur I LOVE roasted chickpeas. I only discovered them recently and am addicted. I usually do lots of olive oil, some cumin, and some smoked paprika.

dj pomegranate

@robotosaur This sounds awesome. I am going to do this tonight.

area@twitter

@robotosaur awesoooooome! Roasted chickpeas are in my recipe queue, maybe I'll make them tomorrow on my day off. I'm thinking of mixing mine with Old Bay.

YoungLeafedJune

@robotosaur I am dangerously addicted to roasted chickpeas (with chilli powder and cumin in my case). I make them and then immediately have to eat all of them. I really hope nobody discovers some kind of chemical or heavy metal that can poison you if you eat ridiculous amounts of chickpeas, because I eat truly ridiculous amounts of them and I won't stop.

Dancercise

@robotosaur
I ate an entire can worth of roasted chickpeas the other night with nothing more on them than olive oil and salt. You guys have inspired me to try different spices now!

OhMyGoshYouGuys

@par_parenthese I make mine exactly like this! This will likely be my dinner tonight.

bitzyboozer

@par_parenthese Smoked paprika (aka pimenton) is absolutely the best thing with roasted chickpeas and also in hummus! Really you can pretty much just sprinkle it on whatever, it's delicious.

planforamiracle

@robotosaur WOWWWW I have never heard of this. wanna try it so badly.

harebell

@robotosaur
This sounds great. My husband has been requesting "more beans" for dinner lately -- he likes light dinners -- so this is great timing. How do you make it a full meal, though? A side salad? Or some couscous and yogurt+ cucumber?

yourpretendfriend

@robotosaur I actually make some quinoa with some garlic and spices and mix the roasted garbanzo beans in it, maybe add a veggie or side and yay dinner!

RK Fire

@all Great. I was already developing a chickpea addiction from making homemade hummus, but now I think I have to start buying chickpeas in bulk. THANKS GUYS

[for giving me healthier snacking ideas]

[jerks!]

Dancercise

@yourpretendfriend
Thank you for this. I will be making a giant batch of this for dinner + lunches for the rest of the week.

Dandyliongirl

@robotosaur I am definitely trying this! My go-to is also chickpeas but my version is take one can of chickpeas and half a bag of mixed salad leaves (the kind with rocket is good!). Throw your chickpeas in a pan with some olive oil, cook for 5ish minutes, and then stir in the salad leaves on the heat until they have just wilted. Then season with salt and pepper and whatever else you feel like, pour into a bowl, and feel accomplished.

par_parenthese

@harebell I roast chickpeas + onions + cauliflower together with olive oil and whatever spices (turmeric/cumin/coriander/garlic/ginger combo is a fave!), and then eat over quinoa and sauteed spinach. SO GOOD.

robotosaur

@harebell You can toss them with greens and a light dressing (not too much or the chickpeas will uncrisp), or you can also make couscous and peas (my OTHER go-to five minute meal) and just have all of that together.

KiwiTheBirdNotTheFruit

@robotosaur Oh my god, this sounds totally amazing. Absolutely making these at the very next opportunity.

Dancercise

@robotosaur
Okay, you can't just throw out the words "couscous and pears" without explanation. Is it as simple as it sounds? Do you cook the pears at all or just add them raw to the couscous? I need to understand that I might partake.

cupcakecore@twitter

@harebell I make chickpeas & kale w/onions, garlic, spices, and stock and then serve over a grain of some kind. It's cheap and pretty filling, no extra work required!

robotosaur

@robotosaur Peas, not pears--though I mix dried fruit and couscous all the time, and now I totally want to try roast pears, couscous, and balsamic. NEW CULINARY ADVENTURES

Mae
Mae

This sounds amazing.

par_parenthese

THIS IS WONNNNNDERFULLLLLLL

PatatasBravas

you and your gif are wonderful!

Emily Beyda

@par_parenthese YAY! Thank you for the compliment and the gif gift!

upsofloating

THIS IS SO GREAT! For depression, I suggest soup. Actually, I suggest soup for everything. YMMV, but during my bouts of depression (the sinky black kind), I find that cooking is incredibly helpful and meditative. Of course this isn't the case for everyone, but here's what I live off during my bouts: sweat an onion and a clove of garlic (sweat=cook over low heat with salt until the onion looks opalescent. Try to smile about the fact that you made onions look like opals). If you want, throw some hacked up bacon in there and let it cook along. I always do because bacon. Add a can of chopped tomatoes or passata and an equal amount of broth. (I just use the empty can as a measuring jug) Bring it to a simmer. Add some orzo and whatever spices you want, basil and oregano are my favorites. Check if it needs salt, grind some pepper onto there. (Or use the ground kind, the fact that you are even cooking right now is amazing, don't worry about being fancy with pepper) Stir every now and then, or just stare into the pot and let the spoon wander around while you cry. This should take ten minutes or so. Once the pasta is done, add some cream. Eat, preferably with someone you care about or in front of an episode of Doctor Who while considering that an internet stranger hopes you feel better soon.

iceberg

@upsofloating Masybe Depression Cooking needs to be a new column too, this was great!

par_parenthese

@upsofloating Another thing I ate a lot in the darker moments of my depression, speaking of soup, was this Rachael Ray (I KNOW SHE IS SO ANNOYING BUT SOME OF HER RECIPES DO NOT SUCK) pumpkin and black bean soup. If you use frozen chopped onions (which are totally fine) and pre-chopped garlic (which is not great but, hello, depression cooking), the entire recipe is basically opening cans and dumping them into a pot.

(ETA: if you use a can of evaporated milk instead of cream, it makes it so that 100% of the ingredients are from freezer or pantry. BONUS.)

upsofloating

@iceberg Aww, thank you! I feel like the suggestions for depression cooking in the comments here could be compiled into the Most Helpful Post Ever.

LilRedCorvette

@upsofloating "let the spoon wander around while you cry" is going to replace stirring in both my vocabulary and my cooking. Thank you.

upsofloating

@par_parenthese The Rachel Ray hate is silly. Her recipes are FINE, and for depressed/stressed/human people, they are kind of great. And agreed on the frozen things, they are wonderful in terms of depression cooking. I am so crazy about this thread!

par_parenthese

@upsofloating I agree. I can't watch her on TV because I have a very low tolerance for cutesy catchphrases, but her method of cooking (eyeballing, chopping and scooping into a pan rather than fancy mise en place) is really approachable and many of her recipes are really easy weeknight things. I like Sara Moulton's style better, but I get RR's appeal.

Also when I edited, my link broke! Here is the pumpkin black bean soup recipe.

upsofloating

@par_parenthese That recipe looks GREAT. It's actually raining here today, which is another reason to eat soup (my cooking is usually weather-based), and I think I'll make this for dinner!

par_parenthese

@upsofloating YAY! I hope you love it.

Ophelia

@par_parenthese One of my friends in college used to make chicken taco soup, which basically involves dumping the following into a saucepan:
- 1 jar salsa
- 1 can beans
- whatever frozen veggies you feel like
- a box of chicken stock
- leftover rice
- shredded, pre-cooked chicken (like from the grocery store rotisserie)
Top with shredded cheddar cheese, eat with corn chips if you have them.

upsofloating

@par_parenthese I did! Thank you!

pinniped

EASY COOKIES (that happen to be gluten-free!)

1 cup generic peanut butter
1 cup sugar
1 egg

Mix. Form in balls, roll in sugar if you want, blop on tray, criss-cross with fork if you want. Bake at 350 for 6ish minutes until they look kinda done. Don't overbake or they won't be melt-in-your-mouth-y when cool. When out of oven, you can top with whatever bits of chocolate bar happen to be in your pantry.

(Thanks, middle school home ec teacher, for the recipe that changed my life!)

TheLetterL

@pennylaner I do these, too, and they are amazing! Substitute honey for about half of the sugar and they will stay chewy! Especially good if you can find (wait for it) chocolate peanut butter.

pinniped

@TheLetterL I know, right? It's kind of incredible how good they are when they're so simple.

Your variations sound utterly wonderful.

TheLetterL

@pennylaner They are my favorite to make because they're so simple and so so good. They're the perfect cookie for situations of unexpected guests/ aww crap, there are people at my door.

mustelid

@pennylaner So my friend takes Xanax when she flies because she freaks out a bit. So once she got home from a vacation, and the next morning she woke up and discovered that she had made peanut butter cookies after getting home.

The thing is, she never really bakes so she doesn't have flour or butter or anything like that in her house. She was stumped.

She didn't discover this recipe until months later, so it was a fun mystery while it lasted. She still refers to this recipe as "Xanax Cookies," which I guess could be a little misleading.

Li'l Sebastian

@pennylaner Just as a heads up, if you make these with raw sugar they start like, throwing up all the peanut butter oil and turn the tray into a weird oily mess, and also crystallize really bad. Use regular sugar.

TheLetterL

@Li'l Sebastian Really? What kind of raw sugar? I've used sucanat and evaporated cane juice with no problem. But I also tend to use half honey to keep them soft anyway, so maybe that changed the game.

pinniped

@Li'l Sebastian Thanks for the heads up! I've also had issues with natural peanut butter making the batter too oily - good ol' Jif or whatever generic is cheapest works best for me.

aphrabean

This is my new favorite feature! I love it! May it live here forever more!

paperandplaster

Am I missing something, or does the Lightning Cake recipe have no sugar in it? Because I think it might need a little.

paperandplaster

@paperandplaster And yes, I finally registered just to ask this, because I want to make instant easy cake every day.

Emily Beyda

@paperandplaster Yikes, right! It's one cup sugar, added at the beginning with the butter. Let me know how it turns out!

Onymous

Also this is where I recommend keeping a box of powdered milk on hand.

I exist almost solely on it because I don't use enough to make a gallon practical and refuse to buy in quarts. BUT even if you buy regular milk: it's awesome for baking and it's great for exactly this sort of emergency because you can just buy a box and forget about it.

trappedinabay

@Onymous I always keep a carton of shelf-stable milk like Parmalat or Organic Valley in the pantry for occasions like this. We call it "emergency milk" for those emergency situations like, oh fuck, we're out of half and half and no WAY am I trudging to the store in my pajamas.

TheLetterL

@Onymous @trappedinabay I was coming down here to say exactly this. I actually just polished off a box of Parmalat from my emergency stash today. No one messes with the dairy in my coffee. No one.

Ophelia

@trappedinabay Even better, those little Organic Valley milk juiceboxes! So you don't have to open your whole stash just for coffee.

rallisaurus

I love this! May we have many many more gluttonous posts in our future!

All emotional upsets should be treated with chocolate. I recently came home from a bad day at work and immediately started making chocolate pudding. Granted, cooking while upset can be...dangerous, but as long as you don't mind a few burns/spills it's all good.
My personal recommendation for easiest and most delicious depression treatment is this chocolate pudding cake. You mix it in the pan, ya'll! It is my dream for all things to be mixed and cooked in one pan. Oh, and I always double it. More puddingy deliciousness.

PatatasBravas

Making this tonight. Except I don't have choc chips on hand. Do you think I could skip them without harm?

fondue with cheddar

@rallisaurus This sounds amazing! It reminds me of the time I mixed too much batter for a loaf cake and it overflowed and I ended up with a huge pile of half-cooked cake goop on the bottom surface of the stove. And I ate it.

rallisaurus

@PatatasBravas Hmmmm...I think that's where all the gooeyness comes from. You could try it, but it might just come out as cake. Or you could chop up some chocolate? I definitely never use mini choc chips and it's not a problem.

@fondue with cheddar I recently fucked up some creme brulee and ended up eating some creme brulee type goop. It was delicious and I have no regrets! It is a necessary part of baking to make the mistakes disappear so everyone things you are a magical genius.

Sidenote: my husband never licks the pot/beaters/whatever enough for my liking. So wasteful! I blame the fact that his Mom baked a lot when he was a kid so he doesn't have that ZOMG! feeling that I had whenever my Mom baked.

fondue with cheddar

@rallisaurus My mom baked a lot, and I still think licking the bowl and utensils is the best part!

Mmm...baking accident goop.

Hot Doom

I LOVE this column! I posted upthread about my favorite food that helped me cope with depression(cookies, cake...not the healthiest), but it wasn't the best alternative to eating nutella with a spoon. Some people don't like canned tuna, but personally, I love it, especially if it's packed in olive oil. It can make a really easy, quick supper or lunch, either fried (SET IT AND FORGET IT) or just mixed with some red wine vinegar and oregano. it's a bunch of protein and can keep you going for ages. Also, nuts. If you can get a big pack of walnuts or a mixed fruit and nut variety, that is also a good mix of sugar and protein that takes not a lot of thought, if you're feeling low. Big hugs to the LW for this one. It is so hard some days, and anything that makes it easier (and provides you with nutrition) is important.

upsofloating

@Hot Doom I struggle with bouts of depression, and the biggest thing that HealtyUpsoFloating can do for SickUpSoFloating is keep a stocked pantry. Canned tuna is wonderful, and can easily be made into a good Crisis Pasta Sauce.

aphrabean

@Hot Doom Yeah - my depression food is fake "tuna" - you make it with chickpeas - and sea salt potato chips. When I'm depressed, I stop eating, so the fat in the chips and the "tuna" salad + the wallop of protein are very good news.

Elsajeni

@upsofloating Yes, tuna! When I was very depressed I ate a lot of Tuna Helper casseroles. For bonus points, add whatever canned or frozen veggies you have lying around -- I tried peas, corn, and broccoli and they were all pretty successful. (This may have led to the problem I have now, where every time I go to the grocery store I think I need more canned tuna and therefore there is a stack of like 10 tuna cans in my pantry.)

Mae
Mae

@Hot Doom My boyfriend made Tuna Nicoise salad recently and it was great (although it does involve a lot of steps). I also like to mix tuna in with pasta and sauteed vegetables, olive oil, salt and pepper, and cheese.

sers1549

Canned coconut milk makes an excellent substitute creamer if you have it on hand. It has the creaminess of creamer but none of the weird aftertaste of things like soy or almond whatever. To be fair, I always have canned coconut milk on hand so that I can make this lentil soup: http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/green-lentil-soup-with-curried-brown-butter-recipe.html

par_parenthese

@sers1549 I cannot say enough good things about 101 Cookbooks. Her recipes are the most amazing beautiful comforting things.

dj pomegranate

@sers1549 Ooh I make her "lively yourself up" lentil soup and it is seriously the most delicious. I'll add this one to me lentil roster!

I want this to be a regular column every single day. This is awesome. Edith and Emma, please take note.

Depression Food: greek yogurt, granola, jam. Mix mix mix, eat for breakfast. Trader Joe's instant coffee packs (individual serving size). Rotisserie chicken from the grocery store. Hummus and baby carrots. Trader Joe's individual meals that you stick in the oven (hey, it's better than nutella).

PatatasBravas

True that/double true on the hummus and carrots. They have carried me through sad times.

upsofloating

@PatatasBravas Hummus with a spoon is my In Case of Emergency Break Glass dinner, depression wise. It keeps you walking.

Mae
Mae

@S. Elizabeth To your excellent list, I would add: Trader Joe's boxed Mac & Cheese with extra cheese grated into it.

themmases

@S. Elizabeth Yes to the yogurt! For a while I wondered if I was missing something and there was some reason you shouldn't put jam on yogurt, because I wanted to but never saw anyone do it. Turns out there is no reason, go for it!

Currently I use fig spread and some kind of generic Grape Nuts. It's amazing.

@themmases YES! Jam! I didn't put two and two together (fruit on the bottom = yogurt with jam in it) until I lived with a super fabulous amazing guy in San Francisco one summer and he made his own jam and canned it, and then ate it in his yogurt every morning. JAM. YOGURT. WAYS TO USE YOUR FRUIT FROM THE FARMER'S MARKET. It was life-changing.

Note: jam canning is not something to do while depressed. It is exhausting and you can't be super lazy about it unless you plan on sticking the jam in pyrex and letting it live in the fridge, sans can.

Dancercise

If you find yourself without jam, honey on Greek yogurt is equally wonderful.

Jinxie

@S. Elizabeth It may not be a good depression project, but I will swear to canning's effectiveness as a great distraction project if you're merely feeling sad/out-of-sorts (I've done a lot of post-break up canning).

@Jinxie Post-breakup canning sounds awesome.

@S. Elizabeth Another easy thing: latkes made out of zucchini. It's summer soon. You will have some zucchini. Shred it, drain it by squeezing it in paper towel or cheese cloth, add some egg, onion, and a sprinkle of flour, fry like a pancake. Super easy.

fondue with cheddar

Depression food: English muffin pizzas. English muffins topped with a spoonful of sauce, cheese, and spices if desired. Easy, delicious, satisfying.

phillystout

@fondue with cheddar English muffin pizzas take me back to spending rainy afternoons in front of the TV watching Rescue Rangers, Ducktales, and Talespin.

Another good depression pizza idea: Take two frozen Celeste pizzas and cook them according to the directions. I personally recommend one pepperoni pizza and one meatball pizza (has much more cheese than other versions for some reason). Once they're cooked, invert one on top of the other and cut into quarters. Instant pizza sandwich!

fondue with cheddar

@phillystout Pizza sandwich! Brilliant!

packedsuitcase

@fondue with cheddar I do polenta pizzas, but this seems like less effort.

omgkitties

@phillystout please run for President so I can vote for you, thanks

phillystout

@omgkitties Ha! It's definitely gotta be Celeste pizzas, Jeno's pizzas are too floppy. Although, I bet they could be rolled up around a microwaved sausage and a handful of mozzarella for a pizza taco...

Mame16th

@fondue with cheddar I also do tortilla pizzas: a whole wheat tortilla, salsa from a jar, frozen spinach, canned mushrooms, and whatever kind of cheese is around grated on top.

bitzyboozer

This is the most useful post/comment section ever! Great job everyone!

par_parenthese

More depression food: Seeded crackers, sheep's milk cheese, apricot jam, olives, funky belgian beer. Zero effort and yet feels very treat yo'self. The more emergency version of this is Triscuits and Laughing Cow cheese and Sour Patch Kids and Rolling Rock because everyone has to go to a gas station.

Also breakfast for dinner always. Eggs and toast take less than ten minutes to make.

par_parenthese

ALSO: SPICY flavor Shin Ramyun with a biiiiig dollop of crunchy peanut butter and two eggs beaten up and stirred in at the last minute. Spicy things: nature's antidepressant.

sophia_h

@par_parenthese Nothing cheers me up like artisan bread, my favorite cheeses, kalamata olives, fancy pepperoni slices, and Hoegaarden for dinner. When I lived with a roommate we would go to the fancy grocery store and get that all time.

Roxanne Rholes

@par_parenthese WHAT. I am making shin ramyun with peanut butter TONIGHT.

par_parenthese

@Roxanne Rholes BRAIN TWINSIES.

pinniped

@par_parenthese I eat eggs and toast for dinner almost every night, no mater my state of mind. (Is there anything more satisfying than dipping bread in runny yolk? I think not.)

rallisaurus

Okay, now I have a question. My Mom used to make fresh strawberry pie every summer and it's starting to be strawberry season and I really really really want some. Plus I have a long weekend to bake. The problem is that my Mom lost her mojo/pie recipe and every pie I try to bake either never sets up, sets up too much, or just tastes bland. How do I recreate the magical strawberry pies of my youth!?

tl;dr Anyone have a perfect fresh strawberry pie recipe?

purefog

@rallisaurus
I don't, but I am betting that the thing that avoids blandness is lemon juice.

Ophelia

@rallisaurus and do you remember if she used tapioca instead of corn starch to set it? That might help get the right consistency. (I've found tapioca works better for very juicy pies, like berry ones, which would require too much corn starch, and come out kind of weirdly starchy tasting).

Jinxie

@purefog Lemon also contains a fair amount of pectin, which is what helps jams set. I don't like using commercial pectin in my jams (makes things too gloopy), but I almost always add a little lemon juice, especially with low-pectin fruits like strawberries.

par_parenthese

@Ophelia WITH YOU on tapioca instead of corn starch. Something about it being more acid stable, maybe?

rallisaurus

@Ophelia Hmmm, I'm pretty sure she just used a jello/gelatine combo, but I don't think even she remembers. I've tried cornstarch and it's not my favorite (yes, too starchy, I want it to taste like fruit!), so I might give tapioca a whirl.

khanyo

@rallisaurus Try macerating the berries by adding sugar to them and letting them sit for a bit. That should make them release a bunch of juice. Take the juice and put it in a saucepan and cook it down with a little cornstarch and maybe some lemon zest until it gets thick. Add it back in to the berries and maybe also throw in some lemon juice to counteract the blandness.

seaview

@rallisaurus I don't know about pie specifically, but the BEST way to bring out ALL OF THE FLAVOUR of strawberries is to add a little dash of balsamic vinegar. I know it sounds strange but believe me you don't taste vinegar, just the most intense natural strawberry flavour. I use it when I make crumble (I think Americans call it cobbler?) - strawberry and rhubarb is my favourite

rallisaurus

Okay, I guess I'll be baking 10,000 pies this weekend. Pooooor me

does it need saying

@seaview Yes so much to the balsamic vinegar on strawberries. It is amazing the difference it makes.

Noelle O'Donnell

So I'm one of those weirdos who doesn't like chocolate, but I make rice pudding instead with cinnamon, agave syrup and coconut milk, so delicious and comforting when you're sad.

Mae
Mae

More depression/easy food: Pancakes. They're really simple and you can kind of put anything in them or on them: applesauce, honey, yogurt, nuts, even cheese. I am also fond of: brie and a baguette, baked sweet potatoes (very fast, and they taste like Thanksgiving)and any variation of grilled cheese.

This thread is the best.

themmases

@Mae Savory pancakes are good too. My boyfriend and I make corn and cilantro ones, then top with salsa and sour cream (although we use Greek yogurt because why not, you can put it on anything). They're good with a side of garlicky greens if you're feeling fancy/not actually depressed. And the original recipe was actually for basil, for those people out there who don't like cilantro.

Baked sweet potatoes are also really good with yogurt on them. Basically keep around full fat Greek yogurt, that way you can heat up any vegetable and add something rich and comforting at the end.

Mae
Mae

@themmases Mmmm yes, Greek yogurt and sweet potatoes! Or Greek yogurt and anything. I like putting a dollop on top of soup or chili.

usually just lurking

Dear Glutton Who Wants To Help,
This is my new favorite Hairpin column, please continue to write more in the future!
I have been struggling with depression making it hard for me to decide what to eat or cook anymore and your answer to that question was very thoughtful and helpful.

upsofloating

@usually just lurking I hope you feel better soon! There are tons of helpful comments here, foodwise. Take care of yourself.

fondue with cheddar

@usually just lurking As you can see from the other commenters, you are not alone! Stop lurking and hang out here with the rest of us depressed people (and not-depressed people too).

usually just lurking

@fondue with cheddar and @upsofloating thanks! you are both very sweet! I agree there are a lot of helpful food comments here, I'll try to go to the grocery store sometime soon...

ingredients for banana cream pie should be first on my list

fondue with cheddar

@usually just lurking You're welcome! I am so sweet that you should share your banana cream pie with me. ;)

upsofloating

@usually just lurking A bit late perhaps, but if you haven't gotten to the grocery store yet: try to stock your pantry. Canned things, rice, pasta, beans, anything that just keeps. Also, fill up your freezer. On the seriously black days it can really lower your food threshold to have stuff to throw together in the house, and right now you need to eat, even if it seems overwhelming. I suggest just ripping off a shopping list from the comments and building yourself a comfort fortress of food. Some of the best advice I got when I was depressed was "you are carbon based. Your feelings are made out of meat. Tend to your physical needs first". Truly, I hope you feel better. Take care.

vunder

Please, this feature, often! Thank you!

vunder

Ok, I have a food question. It's sort of two. A few times a year a bunch of us - usually about 10-15 - go up to a big house a few hours away. We do dinner in groups. What's easy and impressive to make for a group this size and accommodates people who don't eat pork or beef (and quite a few of the folks are fish-averse)? (in the past, we've also had gluten free and vegan, but I think we don't have that this time).

We're going up Memorial Day weekend. I usually get dinner or breakfast duty (it's not finalized yet). For dinner, I've done lots of different things (thai green curry, kung pao chicken, baked lasagne, hoppin john) but want to stay away from the chili, lasagne, taco bar standards. I kind of enjoy doing a big cooking production, but I don't like dealing the stuff that's fiddly and results in lots of leftovers (like the taco bar thing: too many condiments and leftovers, not enough real cooking).

For brunch, I've done various fritatta/egg bake things that can be made the night before and the first one up can put in the oven.

ANYHOW, anyone have any brilliant ideas for either of these meals? I really like doing something relatively interesting if I can. The kitchen is moderately well stocked, but it doesn't always have the perfect thing for everything (plus the stovetop is electric, which is always difficult to adjust to.)

Also, fun or interesting desserts and starter snacks also welcomed!

harebell

@vunder
oh no, I am always so sad when people are fish-averse.

you could do a chicken tagine, though. this one is super-easy and delicious, and sizes up well, especially if you use chicken thighs:
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Spiced-Moroccan-Chicken-with-Onions-and-Prunes-4503

i made it last night and my husband pretty much ran away with all the leftovers this morning before work -- he uttered the most reluctant "do you want to share" ever, haha.

Hot Doom

@vunder One thing I've really enjoyed as a casserole-y type of thing is a spanikopita pie. It might be too similar to a lasagne or a frittata for your purposes, but basically, I get some puy lentils, spinach, feta, lemon juice, garlic, an egg, mint/parsley, and anything else that sounds nice in a pseudo-greek dish: get a casserole pan/pot. set some lentils to boil. Boil til firm and softer, but not too mushy. Drain. Cook some spinach and drain well/defrost spinach, drain well. chop spinach. Combine with crumbled feta, salt, pepper, chopped mint, parsley, minced garlic, raw egg to bind. Taste before or after the egg, to make sure you like how it tastes because that's how it's gonna be. Mix in lentils. THEN: brush one or two sheets of filo pastry with melted butter, and line the pan with them. Dump some filling in. Cover with one or two sheets of filo pastry. Dump more filling in. Put more filo on. Repeat both steps until one or the other is used up. Bake dish at 400F/200C until pastry is golden brown on top/looks good to you. DONE. I love love love this dish when it's cold, because most ingredients are pretty cheap if you don't have them already and are adjustable to different tastes/needs.

themmases

@vunder One thing my boyfriend and I kind of like to do is egg rolls filled with whatever. He makes some good ones that are basically slaw mix, chili oil, soy sauce, and ground pork. I've filled them with mashed butternut squash with chili powder and that is messy but wonderful. I'd think you could fill them with any hot mixture really. We've talked about filling them with spinach and feta.

If people are standing around snacking (or really want separate batches due to diet stuff/allergies) you can definitely fry them shut on the stovetop. However, we've also had good luck baking them (basically we put them in corner-side down at 350, the best starting temperature for all made-up things, then flip them once after we see browning). That way you can do a whole sheet at once. Usually we just spray them both sides with cooking spray, because we're lazy. They're not quite as crispy as doing them on the stove, but they're still pretty great.

Ophelia

@vunder Chili! You can easily make it vegetarian if needed, and even if some people want to put cheese/sour cream on it, vegans can just leave that off. It also goes spectacularly with corn bread, which is easy to make in gigantic batches.

Roxanne Rholes

@vunder if you get stuck with breakfast: for trips like this a good friend of mine always makes homemade granola, and just packs a bunch of bananas, a large container of some kind of berry, and some vanilla yogurt. Homemade granola is super easy but still feels kind of decadent and special, and the fruit is nice to have around for snacking, too.

robotosaur

@vunder For a hearty side, I make pesto potato and green bean salad with fresh pesto. I'm mayo-averse so I like room temperature salads that use alternative bases. This is a good starting point (though I recommend adding some of the nuts to the pesto itself): http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2009/06/pesto-potato-salad-with-green-beans/

RNL
RNL

@vunder For some reason I read this and was like "tamale pie!"

Or, for dinner, a great soup with fresh cornbread and salad? Or a (lame) jambalaya with turkey sausage and no shrimp?

For breakfast, sweet baked pancakes might be nice, like this: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Puffed-Apple-Pancake-107071

I hear you about the taco bar, but I've had great luck with eggs benedict "bars" if you can poach a good egg. Just set up lots of bottom ingredients (tomato, avocado, ham, and omg I LOOOOVE smoked sablefish here), make blender hollandaise (so easy!), let people assemble their bottoms and just keep cranking out poached eggs until you get to eat.

jason049

Yes, all cake is wonderful. Well, except cake with coconut. I can't abide by coconut. Or those cakes that have a gelatinous top layer that seem to be quite popular in Germany. Not. Okay igblast.com

itiresias

growing up, my mom was not much of a cook, and a picky eater herself. a staple meal of mine was pasta with butter and parm. now, i cook a lot, and i have to use gluten free pasta, but it is still my biggest comfort food and a regular in my diet.

Betsy Murgatroyd

My depression go to is Riso Freddo. Mix cooked rice with some mayo and then throw some relish (sweet pickle or a giardiniera of some sort) and vegetables of some sort. For meat, I use tuna or hot dogs. To be honest, the possibilities are endless and I'm not sure why this isn't more of a thing in the US.
And endless variations on ramen. My favorite is shrimp ramen with extra shrimp powder, the packet and chili flakes. I stir that up with a bit of lime and water and pour it on drained and butter sauteed ramen with cocktail shrimp, garlic, and green onion.
Miso soup. Because miso soup is great for all meals. And it's so easy.

Chareth Cutestory

No one wil likely read this, but I just wanted to say how much I LOVE it when my two loves, food and the Hairpin, intersect. I feel like I get all my best food inspiration from these kinds of comment sections!

Also, the mental image of a person making a pie to weepy country music reminds me of how David Sedaris mentions that his boyfriend Hugh used to spend all his time staying in, crying and making apple pies and listening to George Jones. D'aww.

Dandyliongirl

Everything about this post and it's comments is amazing! I could talk about food forever.

KiwiTheBirdNotTheFruit

@Dandyliongirl Yes! More Ask A Glutton, please!

Mame16th

@iceberg I like shredded iceberg (as it happens) lettuce in my ramen, or any other green if I'm being fancy. Then I top it with chopped or julienned cucumber according to laziness. Another good thing is to throw in a handful of broccoli slaw mix when you put the noodles in the water. 2 or 3 minutes is just enough to cook it slightly.

cupcakecore@twitter

Ask a Glutton is great and I completely love it.

rimy

I love this!!! So excited! I want to make all the recipes and I love all the comments aaaaahhhhh

See guys I TOLD YOU NOT TO WORRY, DIDN'T I!!! (I did, you can even check my comment history)

<3 the hairpin 4 ever

HuynhGiaMoc Funiture

Canned coconut milk makes an excellent substitute creamer if you have it on hand. It has the creaminess of creamer but none of the weird aftertaste of things like soy or almond whatever.
quan nhau

pinniped

Oh dear. I just started on a healthy kick this week, trying to get some nutrients into my body after my own post-breakup junk-fest. But now all I want to do is curl up in bed with bacon pasta and British sitcoms...

ayo nicole

More, please!!

moon

Great post, I have been reading this one over and over again. very nice article. - James Stuckey

1963248500@twitter

but the reviews have lots of substitution suggestions, like cloves and a little cayenne. It lasts for days, is good with Parmesan and thick bread, is vegan buy instagram followers

1963248500@twitter

I just started on a healthy kick this week, trying to get some nutrients into my body after my own post-breakup junk-fest. But now all I want to do is curl up in bed with bacon pasta and British sitcoms... henna art

1963248500@twitter

send me back to bed with a sugar coma pretty quickly. Clearly I have subpar ice cream tolerance! high pr do follow blog comments

1963248500@twitter

Recipes will tell you to add specific amounts of liquid, but really, you should keep checking and stirring and add whatever amount of liquid looks like it needs to be added. This is easier than it sounds, I promise. buy groceries online shenzhen

1963248500@twitter

Recipes will tell you to add specific amounts of liquid, but really, you should keep checking and stirring and add whatever amount of liquid looks like it needs to be added. This is easier than it sounds, I promise. films streaming

1963248500@twitter

flavor, and way that it likes to be treated. Hopefully a quick breakdown of the most common lentils, and what to do with them will help! Blog comment Service

1963248500@twitter

flavor, and way that it likes to be treated. Hopefully a quick breakdown of the most common lentils, and what to do with them will help! Blog comment Service

296248062@twitter

Great post I would like to thank you for the efforts you have made in writing this interesting and knowledgeable article. sbothai

1963248500@twitter

what you should use if a recipe just says “lentils.” They make great soup, because they straddle the line between goopy and firm, and are also the best thing ever when cooked with fried onions and rice, like my Sephardic great grandma used to make. vf streaming

1963248500@twitter

Put the pie in your fridge to chill for a few hours, then top it off with whipped cream and some shaved chocolate. Eat it by yourself or with a sympathetic friend, and a big pot of black coffee. It's the culinary equivalent of a long, close hug. personal injury attorney phone number

1963248500@twitter

Which seems crazy in retrospect, because it's a CAKE in a BOX; what could be better than that? But you know what IS better than that, and just as fast? Lightning Cake. ibcbet bandar bola

1963248500@twitter

you will have an essentially perfect cake that's great with cut-up fruit, or jam, or ice cream, or just plain with a glass of milk, out of your hands in front of the fridge like some kind of animal, which is the way I like to do things. appliance repair

RIGHTMOVE

You could post on the friendless of the blog owner. You may illustrate it's mesmerizing. Your blog feedback may add to your contacts. sepatu futsal nike terbaru

1963248500@twitter

, and toss everything together. Plonk it all into a big bowl, and go watch some bad British sitcoms in bed. Remind yourself that you are going to be okay. After all, you're a pasta wizard, how bad could things be? Comprar la ps4

1963248500@twitter

California lawmakers have proposed a bill backed by conservation groups that would expand the state's existing ban on the use of lead ammunition in the eight counties where the birds live to the entire state. the truth about cellulite

samm16

Recipes will tell you to add specific amounts of liquid, but really, you should keep checking and stirring and add whatever amount of liquid looks like it needs to be added.amazon.com/gp/product/B00GR0ESK0

usama

These hold their shape really well, and make a great side dish braised with some root vegetables or turned into a salad with some garlic and fresh herbs. Doane College

amanydv

that also occasionally she pay out period using yours ps2. some little times previously they has been using a good movie enjoying, or next that acquired compulsory about that Psp market language although performing. playstation network codes generator

Shwan

They make great soup, because they straddle the line between goopy and firm, and are also the best thing ever when cooked with fried onions and rice, like my Sephardic great grandma used to make.cambogia supplement for weight loss

usama

Our friends at MasterCard are amazing supporters of NFTE. During the WEF we had the opportunity to spend time with Vice Chair Walt Macnee who, pavers over concrete

Shwan

They hold their shape really well, and have a nice, kind of nutty flavor. Cook them simply, toss them with vinaigrette, and call it a salade aux lentils.JOSEPH

pakistan123

what you should use if a recipe just says “lentils.” They make great soup, because they straddle the line between goopy and firm, and are also the best thing ever when cooked with fried onions and rice, like my Sephardic great grandma used to make. new acne medications

jakie900

toss them with vinaigrette, and call it a salade aux lentils. fastest way to get pregnant naturally

pakistan123

, and are also the best thing ever when cooked with fried onions and rice, like my Sephardic great grandma used to make. Read this page

Edmon

I believe other website owners should take this internet site as an model vigrx plus side effects

Edmon

A person necessarily assist to make severely posts I would state. This is the first time I frequented your web page and up to now? I surprised with the analysis you made to create this actual put up incredible. Wonderful task! vigrx plus

03313961h

necessarily assist to make severely posts I would state. This is the first time I frequented your web page . fiverr dofollow backlinks

2306120401@twitter

AdWebTraffic.com offers targeted web traffic services for all webmasters.
buy web traffic

www.bulksmsbase.com

This is also a very good post which I really enjoyed reading. It is not everyday that I have the possibility to see something like this..I enjoyed reading your post and found it to be informative and to the topic. Thank you for not rambling on and on just to fill the page. Thanks.. bulk sms in nigeria

restu

I've also heard my friend say that like it, but this one was nice and very simple so easily understood. resep kue kering

restu

I can not say much more, it is currently confused about what to say. all your article is very top.
kue ulang tahun

jack13

Yeast Infection Cure Really Work?
Find Out Why So Many People Are Using It to Stop Yeast
Infection Flare-Ups for Good obat peninggi badan alami

jack13

Does Brendt Miracle Yeast Infection Cure Really Work?
Find Out Why So Many People Are Using It to Stop Yeast
Infection Flare-Ups for Good! blog commenting service

amanydv

A unique am valuable with regard to the ones what avoid our zynga code. mine squad cyber-terrorist features learned on strategy towards vehicle facebook free hack consideration. hack fb account online

jack71

Excellent article. Very interesting to read. I really love to read such a nice article dieta disintossicante. Thanks! keep rocking!

Post a Comment

You must be logged-in to post a comment.

Login To Your Account