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Wednesday, May 8, 2013

159

America's Next Top Worst Room

Looking for a new apartment in New York City? Not anymore!

[Via]



159 Comments / Post A Comment

theharpoon

"$620 w/o mattress."

Rubyinthedust

I would totally live in that red room with the high windows and ladder and love it.

Rubyinthedust

@Rubyinthedust although i obviously couldn't afford it

frigwiggin

Wait, why does bottom bunk pay more? Everyone knows top bunk is better!

solaria

@frigwiggin Because falling out of the top bunk is worse. Plus, I assume that the under-the-bed storage space goes to bottom bunk.

ohmy

This makes me feel better about my life choices to avoid New York City at all costs.

PatatasBravas

Started hyperventilating and then realized that I only visit the city, I don't have to live there.

flimflannery

@ohmy I just saw this and I said the same exact thing below.

Nicole Cliffe

This is so much scarier than Paranormal Activity.

Nicole Cliffe

What about the mirror?

PatatasBravas

The mirror is a portal to the alternate universe from which all bedbugs travel: if you look into it, they stream out, thickly and fluidly, like the elevator full of blood from The Shining. You will never be cleansed, no matter how quickly you flee the room and try to find shelter elsewhere. You are tainted for the rest of your life.

RK Fire

curls in corner, cries

Lisa Frank

The worst Craiglist ad for a place in New York I ever saw was from a very odd middle-aged man who was living in what looked like his late mother's apartment. He was advertising sharing his bed with him(!) and the ad had had a very doomsday/ threatening vibe. It was always up on Craigslist about 6-7 years ago. Just reading it made my skin crawl.

Blushingflwr

@Lisa Frank oh, man, when I was first looking for housing in DC I would run into that. On Roomster (which makes it seem so much longer ago than it was!) and I think Craigslist, rooms would pop up for $0. They'd be one-bedroom apartments with a king-sized bed and killer home theaters, and a man looking for a female roommate...

Faintly Macabre

@Blushingflwr There is a ton of that in Paris, too. Some are just idiots, some are flat-out creepy. One guy's photos showed an apartment of indeterminate size covered in mirrors and lit by studio lights. Another guy messaged me twice (even though he didn't match my profile), and when I sent him a negative reply instead of ignoring him, he sent me a long rant about how he wasn't trying to get into my pants and he was just a friendly guy who wanted to live with girls, etc.

Oh! And a few weeks earlier, I started getting weird flirty texts from a number that belonged to no one I knew. My friend and I worked out that since most profiles on the site had a photo and phone number viewable by all paying members, some idiot had decided to try using it as a dating site.

Nicole Cliffe

When you look into the mirror, do you see yourself, or an older, sadder version of yourself? Or do you see nothing at all?

PatatasBravas

You see bedbugs climbing forth from your ear canals and from the corner of your eyes, where once - in a gentler, more innocent time - you had produced eye boogers.

A. Louise

Totally related:

Simple life Manhattan: a 90-square-foot microstudio

I don't understand how anyone lives like this! But the claustrophobia has always been strong with this one..(scurries back to her 950 sq. foot apartment)

Sunny Schomaker@twitter

@A. Louise Okay, I'm jealous of your 950 sq. ft. apartment, but hooray for the Midwest, where I can turn my nose up at anything under 300 sq. ft., and even give the side eye to even larger places.

A. Louise

@Sunny Schomaker@twitter I almost commented on my own post with a "To be clear I do not live in NYC, and bask in the glory of my low cost Midwest town"(and that I really lucked out on my building & apartment location within said building).

That being said, I probably do have more space than I should... but the sock sliding is just too good to pass up.

apples and oranges

@A. Louise Ok THAT BED. How do you have sex when the ceiling is right there above your bed? Also no kitchen D:

TheBourneApproximation

@A. Louise I, too, was fine until I saw the bed. At which point I needed to open a window and take some very deep breaths.

Blushingflwr

@A. Louise I used to sleep in a loft bed almost that close to the ceiling. It was great, but I like small spaces. When I had people over for sex, we would use my sofabed.

The lack of a kitchen is a problem, but if I lived in NYC I'm not sure how much cooking I would do anyway. It basically reminded me of my dorm room senior year of college. I would have to seriously downsize the amount of stuff I owned though (which I need to do anyway).

daisicles

@A. Louise Yup, I would've already had to move out of that apartment after breaking my leg getting out of bed. I don't need a whole lot of space myself, but I feel like it isn't asking too much to have an apartment at least the size of my smallest college dorm room and with enough room to let me sit up properly in my bed.

I think I need to go share this and spread the reactionary claustrophobia to others now.

cminor

@A. Louise I've lived in a 200 Sq ft apartment and (currently) a 2500 sq ft apartment. It's all the same to me. Just more area to clean.

Faintly Macabre

@A. Louise I live in a 98 square foot apartment! (Though my toilet is in the hallway, so maybe I should call it 104 sq. ft?) I actually wish my bed were lofted, though not quite that much, because then I could have somewhere to hang clothes. And when my friends here see it for the first time, they sincerely tell me how lucky I am to have such a nice apartment.

Ophelia

Jesus. If you really want to live in Brooklyn that badly, I'll let you camp on my deck for $10/night if you'll do the dishes.

Also, this just solidifies my certainty that, no matter what my landlord wants to charge in rent, and no matter how long it takes him to fix random crap, we are NEVER MOVING.

TheJacqueline

@Ophelia Yes. This. I want to go home and give my lovely sunny Greenpoint apartment a big hug because yeah, there's no way I am leaving it. Ever.

parallel-lines

@Ophelia You have a DECK? I didn't realize I was among the fancy here, let me upgrade this beer to a Yuenling.

Ophelia

@parallel-lines Dude, if you have Yuengling, you are welcome on our deck. We'll also accept other highfalutin beverage choices as needed.

I probably should warn whoever camps on our deck, though, that the neighbor's roof drains across it, so whenever it rains, we get a giant riverpuddle.

katiemcgillicuddy

My god, that one from May 8th is really unsettling to me.

Ophelia

@katiemcgillicuddy What's even worse is that I looked at the one from May 3, and thought, "well, that one's not SO bad."

large__marge

As a survivor of Craigslist apartment-hunting in Boston, I saw a bunch of rooms with no windows, too. Isn't that illegal? Don't you need an alternate escape route from every bedroom? Or am I making that up?

Although I'm sure someone would scream in disgust at the room I'm paying $675 for.

@large__marge Yes, it is illegal and should be reported to Craigslist.

Ophelia

@S. Elizabeth That's a relief. I get all my knowledge of real estate/rental laws from HGTV, though, so I was worried that was only illegal in Canada.

SarcasticFringehead

@large__marge Yep. It's a fire code violation - every room used as a bedroom (so you can't just call it a "den" and get away with it) has to have two usable exits.

City_Dater

@large__marge

The only thing more dispiriting than apartment hunting in New York is apartment hunting in Boston. Everyone who gets smug and obnoxious at New Yorkers for paying vast sums to live in tiny places, I say to you: Bostonians are doing it too, and it is worse there.

@City_Dater Bostonian right here. Holy shit yes. No, assholes, I am not going to pay $1,400/month to rent a tiny one bedroom in Allston. You have got to be shitting me.

My studio apartment is tiny (TINY) and sometimes I look at my rent check and look at my apartment and think "well, at least my building is really safe." And by really safe I mean, not broken into a whole lot and not gross.

Sea Ermine

@SarcasticFringehead Is this why there are two doors in the same wall of my studio? I had always wondered about that.

Marquise de Morville

@City_Dater I'd say NYC is still worse - at least the Boston realtors I dealt with were not quite as bad, and I did not encounter a "Make 40x the monthly rent as yearly income" requirement.

large__marge

@S. Elizabeth I think you and my man-friend live in the same building. I never knew a studio could be that tiny until I saw his.

@large__marge 300 sq feet: a 12 x 10 room, a galley kitchen, a bathroom the width of a small bath tub, and a tiny little entrance hallway. Functional but... oh man. I gave up on keeping it neat and tidy looking about a year ago.

ATF@twitter

@large__marge As someone that JUST went through the soul sucking process of trying to find a new apartment in Boston, ZOMG, YES, THAT. It was AWFUL.

Long story time!

I live in the North End. Have lived there for almost 9yrs, 6 in my current abode. Current abode is 450sq ft of glory. Gut renovated before I moved in, so it's got tons of storage (floor to ceiling Ikea built-ins = SHOE CLOSET), hardwood floors, washer/dryer, dishwasher, granite counters, ceiling fans, etc. Soon to be available btw! Just gave notice. I love it. Have always thought it was kind of pricey ($1375/mth) but figured it was a good rent overall. Plus it's never changed a dime in the six years I lived there.

Boyfriend and I decide that we should move in together and both respective homes are too small. Mine might be lovely but it is still just 450sq feet. Based on current salaries and rents, we figure we can pay $3000 a month in rent, a touch more if utilities are included.

DO YOU KNOW THE HORROR OF SOME OF WHAT WE SAW FOR THREE THOUSAND AMERICAN DOLLARS A MONTH?!?! Apartments *smaller* than mine, apartments with windows in the "well, you can kind of see out of it but damn that's tiny" sense, appliances from the 70s, stained carpet, one place smelled completely of trash (and that was in Beacon Hill!).

I'm sorry but it's already insane to be paying $3K a month in rent. But if you're going to do it, you should get something actually worth $3K a month. I remain completely scandalized by the experience.

We lucked out and found a good to great place in the Back Bay for $2450 a month and then went through a horror show trying to get accepted. You would think mid-30s professionals, with good incomes and long, peaceful rental histories would be great potential tenants. HA. After the landlord raised the rent to $2500 a month, he doubled the required security deposit.

Next time I move it is because we've bought something. I'm for serious.

large__marge

@ATF@twitter Your last apartment sounds uh-mazing. I hear you on looking at nightmarish places. Good Lord, if I wanted to live in a run-down triple-decker, I'd move out to Worcester and pay 1/10th of the asking price here.

My room right now may be tiny and shaped like Nevada with no real closet, but it's in a Brookline brownstone with nice roommates and heat included, so...tradeoff? Boston, I love you, but damn.

eiffeldesigns

@large__marge @ATF@twitter and other Bostonians. I remember moving from Denver to Boston and being completely shell shocked about the rental market. I ended up with a fucking steal back in 2003- a 2 floor, 1200 sq foot, brownstone in the south end, with deck for $1600.00. But by 2007 they wanted $2100. So I bought a condo in JP.

I highly recommend the JP thing. It's awesome out here.

the angry little raincloud

@City_Dater NYC is far, far, far worse than Boston. I say this as someone who paid $900 (2006-2008) for the dinkiest of dinky studios in which A DEAD BODY WAS LEFT IN FRONT OF THE BUILDING'S ENTRANCE. Best excuse for being late to work ever ("uh, I had to talk to the cops about a dead person, sorry!")

That said, before moving to my lovely, shared place in Harlem, I lived in a windowless room in Bushwick that would fit on that tumblr. Only $950 a month, but 2 minutes from Roberta's!

PS, editing to add, I've lived in some truly shitacular places in NYC (the place above the donut shop in East Harlem, circa 2004, comes to mind), and nobody's ever been murdered in the vicinity of any of my NYC apartments while I was living there. New York for the win!

JessAndNo21

@Kirs moving to JP in June after 6 years in Southie (and my landlord upping our 2 bedroom FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS PER MONTH because she feels like it*). also, i prefer hipsters vs. overgrown frat boys.

*can get away with it.

anachronistique

Murder dungeon, murder dungeon, closet, murder dungeon...

Ophelia

@anachronistique saythatscool, is that you?

SarcasticFringehead

@anachronistique ...murder closet?

A. Louise

@anachronistique Law & Order: SVU location scouts could really put this tumblr to use.

stuffisthings

I could actually see using this tumblr for legit apartment hunting purposes, especially if there was a DC version.

charmcity

@stuffisthings "English basement" SHUDDER

stuffisthings

@charmcity The other apartment in my building was actually featured on Prince of Petworth: http://www.popville.com/2011/06/friday-afternoon-rental-option-u-st-nw/

Ours has more windows but no washer/dryer and is a studio, for $1,250.

Seriously these Bushwick basements look pretty appealing to me.

charmcity

@stuffisthings I've lived in my current place for 3 years. With a roommate. It's falling apart, located several somewhat grim blocks to the nearest (RED LINE :( ) metro, and I have to transfer trains twice a day to get to and from work. Every year I swear I'm moving, and every year Craigslist informs me that I am way too broke to live anywhere else. Maybe Hyattsville. DC is out of control.

stuffisthings

@charmcity When we were moving I was like "Hey we should check out H Street, it's up-and-coming." Then I looked at Craigslist and literally LOLed.

charmcity

@stuffisthings I've laughed those LOLs, my comrade in arms. And then they turn to tears when I realize that my future is probably a jr. 1BR split with four frat bros a mile from the Ballston metro.

Julia duMais

@charmcity I am in Woodbridge at the moment, house-sitting for my parents, and as much as I hate being so far out, I am really not looking forward to trying to find a new place when they move back early next year. :(

Blushingflwr

@charmcity I live a 15 minute walk from the Wheaton Metro, work in Georgetown, and have no car. I went to an 8:30 movie at the Gallery Place Regal last night and got home at midnight.
I would LOVE to move back into the District, but the the Venn diagram of "places I can afford" and "places I would be willing to live" has a very small overlap. (Plus the BF and I are supposed to move in together, so I am waiting for that)

charmcity

@Blushingflwr I am intrigued by Wheaton (I lived there one summer while interning in Old Town, nightmare commute but cheap housing!) and I would rather be in MD than VA if I am going to be priced out of the District. Sounds tough, though :(

Blushingflwr

@charmcity I mean, it's a long commute, but I'm not sure driving would be any faster! I read or crochet or play angry birds on the train, it's all good. Except when I need to get into DC on the weekends and they've shut down a chunk of the red line. I like it more than when I lived in VA, because there I had to take the bus to/from the Ballston Metro and that was definitely meant for commuters with cars and had a crappy schedule. Plus, there's a Dunkin Donuts right outside the Metro in Wheaton. And now there's a Costco, in addition to the very nice Giant and Target.

lobsterhug

Ugh, a realtor showing our apartment told his client's parents that she could easily share a roughly 400 square foot apartment with 3 other people. I wanted to slap him since six college students recently died in a fire because they were living in an overcrowded apartment.

apples and oranges

One of the rooms has the description "(with reliable electricity)" ... oof. Water is unreliable though? Or is this a chamberpot apartment?

TheBourneApproximation

@kangerine Why is "reliable electricity" a point which even needs to be clarified??

stuffisthings

@TheBourneApproximation Because "Plenty of oxygen!" and "Not currently infested with poisonous frogs!" might've been pushing too far, in terms of selling points?

stuffisthings

"The previous tenant was murdered, so need to worry she'll come around and bother you!"

Ophelia

@stuffisthings Experience authentic 19th century tenement living!

stuffisthings

@Ophelia Haha I actually lived in a (former) 19th century tenement in England! Great location and I paid like £170 a month for my room. I would LOVE to experience that in a major American city.

@Ophelia The dream of the '90s is alive in Portland! The 1890s are alive in Portland...

flimflannery

Hey! All my life choices are validated! (NYC I sort of hate you).

Lyesmith

The word "hovel" comes to mind when looking at these. Also, am realizing I'm fairly nitpicky when it comes to living spaces (apartment-hunting in Toronto has yielded some horrors, but nothing nearly this egregious).

Lyesmith

@Lyesmith But seriously, I wouldn't want to live here either: http://www.padmapper.com/show.php?type=0&id=149366836&src=main

themlemons

@Lyesmith I'm apartment hunting in Toronto too! I have lots of time to find something, though, which is good because SERIOUSLY, it's kind of the worst. I couldn't deal with NYC or Boston, apparently.

MilesofMountains

I honestly don't understand how New York can be ~*magical*~ enough for people to move there and live like that. Surely one can be a poor misunderstood artist somewhere else? Is it the variety in take-out? Is that why people move there?

parallel-lines

@MilesofMountains It really isn't. The food is good but you can get better elsewhere and cheaper. Employment is okay but good luck finding a job with a liveable wage that you put in less than 50 hours a week. Public transportation is nice but you're pretty much subjected to the worst human beings on earth and their bad breath. The people can be very cool and fun/interesting but they can also be flaky and self-absorbed and will literally forget about you if you don't text them for a week. People can have hummingbird attention spans from being overstimulated and move on from things very quickly. That bar you liked, it's closed and now it's a different bar and now it's a frozen yogurt place, who cares? It can be really fun if you're in your twenties and poverty does't matter, but if you're in your thirties and still at a working class wage level NYC pretty much hates your guts. Having a good life in NYC is heavily contingent on money (I'm sure people will disagree with me, but the above website shows you what kind of living accomodations you can expect if you don't have money). Don't get me started on education (Bloomberg has fucked that royally) and healthcare (hospitals closing left and right, also fucked). Easily the best part about living in NYC is that most people are pretty educated/liberal and it's not that hard to find people with similar interests. Everything else has just worn me down.

Lyesmith

@MilesofMountains Yeah. Living conditions have such a big impact on people's well-being - living somewhere as shoddy as those places must be difficult for even the most mentally stable & adjusted amongst us. (I personally feel I'd develop depression within a week)

@parallel-lines Thank you for validating the ever-loving shit out of my decision to move to San Francisco from Boston in 3 weeks. People kept bitching to me about how I could TOTALLY find a job in New York (no, assholes, I cannot) and New York and glamour and... no.

I want to go to my fucking farmer's market, go running on the beach, and not hate my life every day. IS THAT SO HARD?

flimflannery

@S. Elizabeth No, that sounds awesome. I'd move to CA too.

MmeLibrarian

@MilesofMountains I live in decent-sized college town/city in the upper midwest with amazing food (takeout, farmers' markets, restaurants, etc.), progressive values, great public transit and schools, and a decent job market. I pay less than a grand for a large, well-maintained two bedroom with a dining room, a yard, two parking spots, and a private washer/dryer. File me firmly in the "oh please don't do this to yourself, nice people who aspire to NYC" camp.

Sea Ermine

@MilesofMountains I think a huge part of whether or not someone would want to move here is where they are coming from. If you currently live somewhere nice, where you have a nice apartment, or access to a nice apartment, where you have a job or can find jobs, where you have friends and are happy, and where you can get around easily...there isn't really any reason to move here.

For me though, I lived somewhere with a terrible economy and no jobs, where the job I have now would pay $13000 less a year, where I couldn't meet people who accepted me, where I could barely get around (couldn't drive and the town was built for people with cars), where people were not open to befriending those who didn't grow up there, where there was little to do, and where I felt very very lonely.

Since moving to NYC I can use public transportation to do things like go more than walking distance from my apartment, I meet so many wonderful people (I've moved a lot and lived in many cities and the people in NYC are by far the nicest and most helpful), have access to all kinds of green space I didn't before (Central Park!), have a very easy time making friends and meeting people (because people will befriend you even if you didn't grow up with them), and where I have access to a larger number of free and cheap cultural events and entertainment that I didn't before. I am much much happier here than where I was before and it has done wonders for my depression.

Tl;Dr I think whether it's worth it to move here depends ,i>a lot on where you're coming from and what kind of experiences you had before moving here. For me, how welcoming the city has been makes the high rents and expensive everything and the many many problems this place has very worthwhile.

stuffisthings

@MilesofMountains I feel the same way about (central) Paris. None of my Parisian friends can comprehend the American obsession.

iceberg

@MilesofMountains Ladies be varying, yo. I've only been to New York once but I was looking at these like "I could deal with this as long as it was in a safe neighborhood in NEW YORK CITAY" concrete jungle where dreams are etc.

parallel-lines

@MmeLibrarian Go in your twenties, get it out of your system and leave by thirty. That's what a good chunk of my friends did and I envy them.

TheJacqueline

@parallel-lines HHC has its problems, but a hospital like Bellevue, which has sliding scales for pretty much every service and is staffed by NYU physicians, is a pretty rare bird in this country.

Sea Ermine

@MilesofMountains Also you can definitely be a starving artist elsewhere. The thing about NYC (I'm an admin assistant and not involved in the arts at all so forgive me if some of this is not 100% accurate) is that certain industries (ex. publishing) are based almost entirely here and so it would be very hard for someone just starting out to create an entirely new basis for their industry elsewhere.

That said, a number of cities have good art scenes. I think the Durham/Chapel Hill are is one of them, possibly also Ann Arbor and I'm sure there are a bunch of places in the Midwest that are creative and could be a good place to start out as a musician or an artist. Additionally, I think Detroit is offering help and grants and stuff to young artsy people to revitalize the city. I'm pretty sure that's how Hostel Detroit got started.

Also, the apartments listed above are in expensive neighborhoods. It would be like looking at Arlington and saying "well, Virginia is clearly too expensive for anyone to live here". And yes, all of New York is expensive and there are huge problems with finding affordable housing for lower income families. But at the same time, if you are looking at something in the price range of what's in that tumbler it's not so bad. In my neighborhood you can get a large, nice two bedroom + living room in a safe area with access to grocery stores and a park for $1500 a month. Bring a roommate and you've each got a nice room for $750.

parallel-lines

@TheJacqueline It's incredibly hard to get a job as a nurse there (esp as a new grad nurse) and they pay their RNs what I would call a barely liveable wage. The only good thing about being a HHC nurse is union representation. I can't attest to RN working conditions in the rest of the country (well, I can a little but it's limited to a few states) but in NYC hospitals (and especially HHC hospitals) they are not great.

That being said - and sliding scale aside, NYC has a major problem with primary care access, which can be and is atrocious even if you have good insurance. I'm more than a little worried about 2014 PPACA since NYC has really gutted their hospitals and many are already struggling financially. Thank goodness LICH isn't closing because that could make an ugly situation worse.

Derbel McDillet

@MmeLibrarian I live in a smallish college city in Appalachia, and ditto pretty much everything but the public transport (which isn't terrible, but not great either). We pay less than a grand a month for a small house on acreage a little outside of town. It's paradise to me, but then again I was checking out books on homesteading from the library pretty much all throughout high school. I guess we each have our own idea of paradise.

Sea Ermine

@stuffisthings I think cities anywhere can be very polarizing that way. Because most cities tend to have some awesome things (arts, culture, parks, fancy shit) but because they are cities they are also usually crowded and dirty and polluted and noisy.

And, I kind of love in loud noisy places but I grew up in cities so that's what feels like home. But if you don't love that, than whether you like a city depends on whether or not the nice stuff they have is enough to overcome the fact that you commute to work in a tube stuffed full of people and you can hear your neighbors having loud sex every night in your $1000 a month apartment.

stuffisthings

@Sea Ermine Very true -- my wife is from Paris and loves shopping at big-box stores and eating at McDonalds (both here and in France), I'm from exurban Florida and love being able to walk to work and be surrounded by people who can read and aren't mouth-breathing reactionaries. I can only assume our kids will yearn to be hermits in the mountains or something.

TheJacqueline

@parallel-lines Oh the pay is horrific in HHC hospitals, but the type of services they offer are pretty unusual.

A lot of the hospitals are trying to shore up for the PPACA by creating giant conglomerates; NYU and Continuum were in serious talks for awhile. That fell through, and I believe Continuum is talking to Mt. Sinai at present. The situation is not really ideal, and Fed. govt cuts to medi. programs have not helped any.

But to be fair, primary care access is a problem nation-wide. There are no incentives for really good medical students to become primary care doctors, and thanks to Medicare restrictions it's impossible to open up new residency slots in programs without jumping through a number of hoops and already having the funding in place. There should be more allowances/funding for NP-run practices, and there should be more scholarship/loan forgiveness options for students who choose to to become primary care practitioners. It's not an NYC-only problem though. Health-wise, you are better off here than in a rural part of the country where there is a dearth of practitioners altogether.

Edit: It's not surprising to me that nursing conditions aren't great here (though it is saddening); I'm in NYC, in healthcare informatics, and we have a lot of nurses that made the switch quite early on in their careers.

pinniped

@Sea Ermine Yes to everything you said above! I lived in the Triangle area of NC, which did seem to have *everything* I could want culturally - amazing music scene, arts, huge foodie revival, outdoorsy stuff, chill vibe - seriously, something for everyone. But a) to pursue my career of choice I basically HAD to move here b) couldn't afford to buy a car anyway, so had to leave that area, even if not for NY.

I miss the south so much sometimes, but hey - I have an amazing large-ish apartment with separate (non-railroad!) bedrooms, living room, separate kitchen, and an EXTRA room we made into a study (!!) for CHEAP because I live in a "non-cool" nabe of Brooklyn. Which is full of families and brownstones and the best food ever and I love it.

(Sorry if that sounds braggy! Just trying to say that living in Brooklyn does not necessarily equal bedbug rathole cell!)

parallel-lines

@TheJacqueline heh, yeah - I'm in NYC too. I wouldn't be surprised if I ended up in informatics sooner than later. RN unemployment in this city is so high (47% for new grads) that a lot of new nurses end up just going right into a master's program because they can't find a job. Pretty sad state of affairs right now...

solaria

@MmeLibrarian You're not honestly comparing Minneapolis/St. Paul public transit with NYC's, are you? (Other than that, you're dead on)

MilesofMountains

@Sea Ermine Ok, that makes some sense. I admit, all I know about New York is from people posting on the internet, who often seem to be complaining that they can't find a job/can't find a job that will meet cost of living, so I didn't realize it was a job hub.

Ophelia

@parallel-lines Yeah, I live down the street from LICH, and it would be a disaster for a large swath of Brooklyn's population if it closed. It's not the greatest hospital in the world, and it has some serious, serious management problems, but it is All People Have. Primary care options here are really limited (unless you have insurance AND can afford to miss a whole day waiting in the doctor's office). I'm a solidly upper-middle class, insured person in my 30s, and I only managed to find a doctor because she'll accept pregnant ladies newborns/their families (she's a family physician). For the past 2 years, whenever I needed a doctor, I would go to a walk-in clinic in Brooklyn Heights, and hope that I got there early enough, and looked sick enough, to be seen relatively quickly. It's nuts.

parallel-lines

@solaria Hey, it's not that bad! I'm actually pretty impressed with it, I know they have a ways to go but the bike/ride thing is really awesome. I've actually been considering moving back because Minneapolis really doing great things and is so bike friendly, only thing holding me back is that my husband is a complete bitch about the cold.

Sea Ermine

@MilesofMountains It really depends on what industry you're in. There are some industries where it would be really hard to get a job here. Others where there are lots of jobs and they pay higher here than eslewhere (that was the case for me). Others where you pretty much have to be here but they don't pay you enough to live here (ex. publishing, the fashion industry, etc.), others that are based mostly here and also pay insanely highly but aren't open to everyone (fancy banking jobs). And there's also a bunch of middle of the road stuff where the industry is ok and the number of jobs are comparable to elsewhere and the pay is ok. For me it has been worth it because the kind of jobs I wanted to do had big industries here, and I had an easier chance of getting hired. If I wanted to be a painter though, there is no way in hell I'd move to NYC.

I think if you want to move here and be happy it would be best to explore what kind of jobs opportunities there are in your field in NYC and how much they pay, rather than picking an industry and hope you can make it here with that.

ETA: I think part of the reason you see a lot of frustration with NYC on the internet is because a lot of people on the internet are writers and bloggers and that is a tough industry to make it in, especially somewhere as pricy as NYC. But that's not a good example of the kind of jobs you can get here, because it is a large city with many many business other than arts/writing/publishing

parallel-lines

@Ophelia You ARE fancy - that's a great neighborhood. I'm upgrading that beer from can to bottles. I'm actually doing my nursing program in Brooklyn (it'll be pretty easy to figure out where via this comment) and LICH staying open is a god send for me because they service the juvenile detention facility on Atlantic Avenue. That is an ugly situation I don't want to deal with quite yet.

Urgent care clinics are AWESOME! I haven't had a PCP in three years because I can't find anyone A) accepting new patients and B) with less a month wait time for appointments. I'm glad more urgent care places are opening, they're definitely filling a huge need.

Jinxie

@S. Elizabeth The housing situation's not any better out here, but at least we're never more than a few miles from the ocean!

TheJacqueline

@parallel-lines Murray Hill Medical Group!!! They are the freaking best and they are constantly taking new patients.

MmeLibrarian

@MilesofMountains I'm not in MPLS. But, no, I wouldn't begin to suggest that there's anything even remotely comparable to NYC public transit anywhere in the United States. The public transit in my city is great for my city, but it would be miserable for anything larger.

forcingasmile

@S. Elizabeth San Francisco is the best, really.

parallel-lines

THIS ISN'T EVEN FUNNY BECAUSE IT'S MY LIFE. Sigh.

I have lived in one of these horrible, windowless rooms (at least it had high ceilings) to the tune of $700/month. It was miserable and completely fucked up my sleep schedule and made me cripplingly depressed.

All of these apartments look like the kind of place you'd find a woman who was abducted in 1983 being held against her will.

Urwelt

I notice none of these have DISGUSTING WALL TO WALL CARPETING, like my first NYC apartment. Five of use lived there and none of us owned a vacuum, or more troublingly, considered buying one.

liznieve

@Urwelt
D:

meetapossum

This is why I live in Queens.

There really is no way to make a basement room/apartment appealing, is there?

Blushingflwr

@meetapossum I actually wish I lived in the basement right now. The basement in my house has its own bathroom and is closer to the laundry room.
But they don't tend to photograph well, no.

meetapossum

@Blushingflwr I have lived in two basement rooms and not been miserable, and I've seen other people's basement apartments that seem just fine, but the lack of daylight starts driving me batty. I like A LOT of light in my bedroom. After my last basement room I pretty much declared, Scarlett O'Hara-style, that I would never live in a basement again.

@meetapossum A popular DIY/home decor blog I sometimes read/hate-read had a post a few months ago that was shitting on Queens, like "haha we lived in Astoria because we couldn't afford anything better!" and I unsubscribed so quickly it was ridiculous. Because a. don't shit on someone's neighborhood because your middle class suburban sensibilities couldn't handle Queens and b. Queens is awesome.

My family is from Flushing (well, first they were in Maspeth in the late 1800s and then scooted over to Flushing after WWII). Glamorous? No. Cool? No. Totally someplace I would live? YES.

meetapossum

@S. Elizabeth I don't really understand why people would want to pay sometimes twice as much for a far shittier place in Bed-Stuy or Bushwick when you can move to LIC or Astoria or Woodside or Sunnyside or Ridgewood and have just as much to do as in Brooklyn! I guess it's that whole "haha, Queens sucks" attitude due to...I don't know. You just have to shit on someone to make you feel better about yourself? Stay in your overpriced neighborhoods, then, and my rent can stay low.

Blushingflwr

@meetapossum I mean, I work in a windowless office, and I def used a den as a bedroom for a while when I lived with friends. The thing I do in my office is that I have a daylight simulation lamp, which is what I would do if I lived in a basement again. But I have been known to be sitting in the dark and not notice (e.g. if I am on the computer or watching TV and it is sunny and then the sun sets you will often find that I have not turned the lights on). It's definitely a "different strokes for different folks" situation; everyone has different priorities for housing.

meetapossum

@Blushingflwr Haha, I have totally done the "Surpise! It's dark!" thing before.

Franny

@meetapossum I basically logged in to say, "Move to Queens, dumbass."

Seriously some of the more expensive rooms that he posted could get you a studio in Sunnyside.

Franny

@S. Elizabeth Queens is entirely awesome, especially because of the food. Whenever people stay with me, we go to Flushing or Elmhurst or wherever. Queens is the most diverse, per capita, city in the country--but Brooklyn is a very "authentic experience."

Bittersweet

@S. Elizabeth My former colleague moved from Soho to Queens a few years ago. He reported that it was "all the restaurants and none of the a-holes, for half the rent."

liznieve

@Blushingflwr
I currently live in an, ahem, garden level apartment (half basement) and actually love it. I don't even have the garden part, just the front part. Ceilings are a wee low, but I have nice can lights and can't hear (much) of upstairs. It's on a pretty block and what I can see past the trashcans is beautiful. Plus, it's nice and cool. I went from living in an apt that had so much light that it sometimes felt like you were between the lampshade and the bulb, and I actually find the dimness a bit comforting.

Miss Maszkerádi

I'm trying to find a new place within NYC and this is just making me WEEP.

YoungLeafedJune

I am moving from my adorable midwest town and 450/mo (tiny but close to my job) 1 bedroom to Boulder, and I'm feeling very whiny about how much less I get for my money out there. It guess it could be much much worse though! Thank you, New Yorkers. Your misery gives me comfort.

Derbel McDillet

@YoungLeafedJune My parents live in Boulder and it is insane! They keep dropping hints about how I should move out there, but there is no way I could match the quality of life I have at my current place.

liznieve

Oh man. These were all of the places I saw when apartment hunting. You want $1800 for this rat-infested (I hear the screeeetches) dirthole in no-man's-land between Clinton Hill and Hasidic Williamsburg? 'Scuzi? Or on this block in Bed-Stuy that isn't the charming part, and on which someone was recently shot? With the "refinished" floors where you just poured shiny (?) sealant over them, sealing in dirt and all?

When I finally saw my apartment I cried and hugged the landlord. UNICORNS DO EXIST. Even real estate unicorns in New York.

RK Fire

I look at the tumblr and even though I know better, I naively think "Oh, $1100/month for a one bedroom apartment isn't that bad" because apparently my mind cannot even comprehend the idea of $1100/1 room.

@RK Fire ... I am going to be paying around that in San Francisco. Somehow this seems like a bargain. Note: it is a room in a very nice house.

RK Fire

@S. Elizabeth I think many things become justifiable (at that price) if it's a nice room in a nice house, in walking distance to places you'd want to go. These places are suspect.

@RK Fire Oh, absolutely, 100%. I think I first read your comment as "$1100 for a room is objectively bonkers!" as opposed to "$1100 for THIS room is bonkers!" And then I felt stupid, like maybe everyone else had found a way to live in the city near their work for a crazy small amount of money, and I'm just a sucker? #pleasevalidatemychoices #iamsostressedaboutmoving #omgthoseroomsaregross

RK Fire

@S. Elizabeth Hahaha, I totally understand! I mean, I live in Baltimore, so $1100/room is objectively bonkers in the market I'm used to. (It still happens, but generally only with BALLER apartments/condos/rowhomes.)

However, SF? I can totally see that being justifiable! Especially if it's in one of the prettier neighborhoods, walking distance to things, close to the BART, etc. Also, I should probably clarify that I am commuting an hour each way everyday since I don't want to live outside of a major city and I want to live near good Indian food and in a walkable community, so YMMV, etc.

I've also lived in Somerville/Cambridge and occasionally contemplate moving to DC, so on one hand I get it.. but on the other hand I hate the fact that the markets are even working this way.

Jinxie

@S. Elizabeth (That actually is kind of a bargain these days...hopefully you're also in a good 'hood?)
(Also, I swear I'm not intentionally following you around this thread! Sorry if I'm being stalkery!)

the angry little raincloud

@RK Fire I had the opposite experience moving from Boston to the midwest. I kept asking the realtor: it's $525 for the entire apartment? It was a two bedroom, and I kept asking, "it's just me. So, at the end of the month, the TOTAL rent is $525? Not $1150?" I could not comprehend an entire apartment could be that cheap.

chrysopoeia

Solution: live in the parts of Brooklyn that the New York Times hasn't already written profiles on. Much cheaper.

(Not much.)

(But you'll get a window.)

Millipenny

@chrysopoeia Yes. Absolutely this.

Mayor of Butt City

The author was sucked through a secret Craigslist filter portal that takes you to a setting where the "show me rooms where someone was murdered" box is always checked.

But what do I know, I live in Bed-Stuy. In a garbage can.

cminor

@Mayor of Butt City I lived in a small, nice, fully furnished, pest free (for the most part, we did have a mouse, caught it in the trashcan let it go outside (too afraid to kill it ourselves)) two bedroom apartment in Bed-stuy, a 7 min walk to the A, and Super Food Town, never felt unsafe. And it was like 2,000 a month? Our landlord was nice and lived downstairs.

Mayor of Butt City

@cminor That sounds pretty good. I have a semi-sweet situation where I live in a large, unspeakably cheap apartment off the G train. It's super casual in that we can do pretty much whatever we want paint/construction wise. The cheapness and casualness also means, on the flip side, that literally nothing gets fixed until it's leaking/on fire, my landlady often asks to borrow money, and the hot water is frequently on the fritz. Also, I have gotten to the point where I feel a primal glee in dispatching mice, throwing them out the window and watching feral cats bee-line to the drop spot for snacks. Majestic circle of life.

BUT we have roof access and climb up there to howl at the glamorous skyline of a city that keeps tricking me into thinking it's great.

par_parenthese

So. Never moving to New York. *opens bank website, looks at <$500/mo mortgage payment, feels pleased with life choices*

MmeLibrarian

@par_parenthese Dang. Well played.

TheJacqueline

Sometimes when I read the comments I feel like I am the only person who lives in New York and actually loves it. :(

PatatasBravas

There are eight million people in your city; at least a dozen or so must love it.

TheJacqueline

@PatatasBravas there are dozens of us. DOZENS!

chrysopoeia

@TheJacqueline I love it NOW, but it took like 10 years of shitty apartments to find one that didn't make me feel like MURDER.

PatatasBravas

Perhaps even a baker's dozen or more!

liznieve

@TheJacqueline
Nah. I love it. I mean, like any city, it has its... positives and negatives. I couldn't do what I do (somewhat boundary-pushing urban architecture) anywhere else. I probably wouldn't have the weirdo assortment of friends I do. Ugh, I'd have to get a car. Wouldn't have the opportunity to drunkenly make out with a rando on the subway platform because there were construction delays and we were bored. (what? he looked clean.) Summer Staaaaaage.

Obvs there are eleventy billion reasons to love this city, it's just a few of the major factors are total bummers. But they don't have to be. Or at least, you adjust your expectations. Which is maybe a sign you have been here too long and should get out. But maybe not. Everyone has their priorities in life and sacrifices others to fulfill them. For me, this city works, mostly. But there are times when I cry and bitch and moan that this city is the worst and who do I think I am spending all of this money to live here? I am going to die alone and bankrupt! One of those grannies with roommates! But pfft. The opportunities I have here can't be replicated anywhere else, really, and for that it's worth it.

City_Dater

@TheJacqueline

You are so not the only one! I sincerely like my apartment (if not some of my neighbors) and there is nowhere else in the US that would offer me the possibilities for work (and life) experiences I have here. If all I wanted from life was a large and inexpensive place to live, I would never have left my parents' house.

ach_so

@TheJacqueline I love it! I live in Brooklyn, just in a random neighborhood instead of a cool neighborhood.

catfoodandhairnets

@TheJacqueline Nope! I love it. But after renting my first (shitty) New York apartment I bought a cheap coop in an unfashionable part of the outer boroughs and will never move again.

MollyculeTheory

This just supports my theory that if you want to have a nice apartment in NYC you have to be willing to sleep in the same bed as someone else.

meetapossum

@MollyculeTheory Usually when I think about moving in with a boyfriend (NB: I am single), I mostly think about how great it would be to save money on rent.

alannaofdoom

@MollyculeTheory - So... the same bed at the same time, or could you work out some sort of shift rotation?

Miss Maszkerádi

@MollyculeTheory I shared bunk beds with someone I vaguely knew from high school a few years back. She talked in her sleep. A lot. About me. About how weird and awkward and annoying I was.

I moved out.

rimy

I am moving to NYC in 3 weeks... aaaaahhhh.

No, we already got an apartment - $1100 for a 1 bedroom with lots of windows in an uncool but safe neighborhood. ~phew~

metermaid

This gives me PTSD.

TheJacqueline

@parallel-lines Murray Hill Medical Group!!! They are the freaking best and they are constantly taking new patients.

Chrestomanci

I was looking at Melbourne houses on Gumtree recently and found one with the selling point 'NO MESS AND NO SMELL'. Wow, I hadn't dared to hope to find a place that was both tidy AND stink-free

Megasus

nope, not moving to New York ever.

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