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Monday, March 19, 2012

118

A Conversation With Kate Zambreno, Author of Green Girl

Edith Zimmerman: Kate! I reviewed your novel Green Girl for The Morning News's annual Tournament of Books last Friday. The book wasn't my cup of tea, but I felt weird saying so, because it so clearly was other people's cup of tea. For instance, while I was writing the review, someone I didn't know emailed me, sort of magically (almost spookily) out of the blue to say:

I just read Green Girl, by Kate Zambreno, and it has just blown my tiny little heart to shreds. I'm writing in the hope that one of you might like to do a feature on it, or interview the author. So then I could join in the conversation in the comments because I just have so many feelings and opinions about this book.

It's the story of Ruth, a young American woman living and working in London, as a department store perfume-dispenser. It is so, so good, and fierce and nihilistic and about what it is to be a girl desperately seeking her identity and watching movies and having depressing sexual encounters and looking very stylish. In case you are wondering, I'm not a publicist, and I don't know the author, I'm just a blogger (I wrote a review here if you are interested).

People then called my review "lazy" and said it was the "sorriest" part of the tournament so far. So, it was an exciting day! Ha. I can only imagine what's it like seeing your book dissected online.

Kate Zambreno: Yeah, it's pretty weird. I mean, I’ve received negative reviews in the past, and I liked to think I was someone that could handle a few bad reviews. But overall, prior to this Tournament most of the reviews of Green Girl have been really really positive. So I was totally unprepared for how passionate these Tournament of Books readers and fans were — I mean, they go for the throat. And almost overwhelmingly people who were commenting about this seemed to just really passionately hate the book. Initially I was really shocked by it, and felt really raw and sensitive about it. It was a lot to calibrate. 

I was aware that often writers deemed “experimental” once they enter the mainstream are met with passionate readers who really, really hate works that veer from the traditional novel — in terms of plot or character, etc. But this was really my first entrance into any mainstream readership. I hoped it turned some new people onto the book. I think this novel really seriously challenged some people. Maybe that’s a good thing. But I was surprised sometimes at the level of vitriol that seemed really personal — towards my intellectual capabilities or talent as a writer, for instance, or towards the main character, that didn’t recognize that part of the frame of the novel is having a narrator who was commenting on and interrogating this character as well. I took it personally, but it also felt personal. But yes — I’ve had to think about how to get a thicker skin as a writer. I still need to figure it out. I think part of being a writer for me is having a thinner skin — to be receptive, aware, sensitive. But I need to stop fucking Googling myself. I had writer-friends when this all happened — bloggers and novelists with much bigger readerships/followings than me — tell me that I need to stop Googling myself, reading my reviews. I’m still trying to figure that out. I do wonder whether there’s more vitriol/hate/condescension leveled at women writers, especially women writers who feature young women as their main characters — a conflation with the author and the character, for instance.

EZ: I feel bad, because my review didn't mention the narrator. And one of the earliest comments on TMN called me out on it, and I was like, shit. Because it was totally fair. I wrote a comment at the time, but deleted it right before posting, because I didn't know if it was stupid/embarrassing to be like "you're right, I messed up." But, they were right, and I messed up. And I didn't mention the narrator mostly because I didn't know what to make of her. I thought of her as a sort of mysterious, nebulously motherly figure (Ruth's creator?), although I didn't feel confident enough to say so. Afraid I'd missed something.

A lot of the pro-Green Girl commentary has mentioned that it's good and important to challenge a reader. And that I'm wrong for essentially saying "I didn't like this book because I didn't like the girl in it, lol." Which also is fair, and makes me want to be like "but you guys I'm not a book reviewer, I don't know anything, they just sent me these in the mail, ahhhh," but that's also a stupid cop-out.

(And I feel a little ridiculous even putting myself into this conversation, because you wrote a novel, and I wrote a review. That a lot of people thought sucked. I would love someday to make a book, and I think it's awesome that you have. (Multiple books!) Also, people should obviously buy Green Girl and read it. [Or buy it from Indiebound!])

So, my question is: do you like Ruth? Or: how do you feel about Ruth? I kind of wish Ruth could be with us on this email thread, although it's hard to imagine her on the computer. (Would she have a Facebook profile?)

(And I know what you mean about reviewers conflating young women writers with their characters — sort of like people see the book and see the author photo, and it's like they hear this implicit whisper: "here's my book, here's me, please be gentle, I can only think about myself!")

KZ: The novel exists for me in tension between this character, Ruth, and this ambivalent, ambiguous mother-narrator (so yes! as you said!). I started this novel in my mid-twenties when I was working retail in London, at Foyles Bookshop, and devouring for the first time all of the silver Penguin paperbacks of Jean Rhys and the golden Peter Owen paperbacks of Anna Kavan, and Jane Bowles. And at first the work existed on one level — channeling up the ghosts of the past, but then I began to realize that the modernist novel of the stream-of-consciousness of an alienated girl or woman in the city had really been done (see: Mrs. Dalloway, see: Two Serious Ladies, see: Good Morning, Midnight, see: Asylum Piece), and so wonderfully and agonizingly at that. So the narrator-character developed as I began to think about the idea of the girl as character, all the girls who have been trapped in some sort of beautiful protected amber as tortured or flitting muses and projections in all of these novels by the male “genius” gods (Virgin Suicides, cough). A work that Green Girl is in dialog with is the Portuguese writer Clarice Lispector’s slim, devastating The Hour of the Star — about a girl living in the slums of Rio and working this blank yet somehow mystic experience as an unloved, orphaned typist enthralled to Coca-Cola and Marilyn Monroe — although the god-narrator in that book is male, and I had always wondered why. I think of Green Girl as a meditation on youth and beauty, but also an interrogation into the creative process, into writing, into being a woman writer, into the girl who lives her life as an object, a character, into the blank yet mysterious girl in literature and film by male auteurs. The Hour of the Star is about class, rigorously, as well as gender — about the invisibles of society — but in some way I feel Green Girl is too, Ruth is a nameless foreigner, a shopgirl.

I think I used the narrator oftentimes to indicate my ambivalence towards Ruth, my cruelty towards this girl, who is in many ways self-consciously a character, a cipher, a grotesque. I often experienced horror at Ruth. I didn’t always like her. I wanted her and Agnes to be banal and boring sometimes. I love Ruth though. I love her, I loathe her. I think I am asking whether this loathing comes somewhat out of our culture. I was interested in the role of the blonde ingénue as a Hollywood construct (when writing the book I was really aware of all these Saw-like horror films, or like Catherine Deneuve in Roman Polanski’s Repulsion), the blonde as this victim character. I was also kind of obsessed with celebutantes like Britney Spears and Lindsay Lohan, and their quite public unraveling and the way the media functioned as a cruel coliseum. So for me there was a whole other fascinating layer to the Tournament of Books spectacle — the passionate vitriol directed at Ruth — that is basically doubling what I was investigating and even echoing the book’s own narrator. Yet, I don’t think Ruth is entirely a wet-blanket — I see glimmers of possibility in Ruth, the sort of coming to consciousness. A watchfulness, an intensity.

Totally right and interesting what you say about Facebook — this is totally a pre-Facebook text — identity and the creation of identity in public is so different now. She’d totally have a Tumblr. My critical memoir Heroines that’s coming out through Semiotext(e) in the fall deals a lot with how women writers have been read historically, beginning with modernism, but also with girls writing, what has prohibited the girl from writing. The work tries to investigate this idea of the girl as the eternal character, beginning really with Zelda Fitzgerald, how this has affected ideas of subjectivity, but also how girls and women are authors now on their blogs and Tumblrs, etc.

I was really struck by the insistence in this particular forum that Green Girl was only a novel for a certain young girl. I thought this was totally bogus. I mean, yes, I feel really gratified when people say that they identified with Ruth — if literature can make you feel less invisible, less marginalized, more known, that can be a magical thing. But literature should be more than about identification. It totally brought me back to Virginia Woolf in Room of One’s Own — the idea that “feminine” experience as written in a novel will be derided as not “universal,” not potentially all the stuff for literature.

And a lot of people were pathologizing Ruth — I do not see the work as a study of depression, but certainly not an anthropological portrait of mental illness. In Heroines I write: “ANXIETY. When he experiences it, it’s existential. When she does, it’s pathological.” A character does not have to be redeeming, or likable. I think of Ruth as an antiheroine. And I find too few examples of the antiheroine in women’s literature, and certainly too few that are celebrated as literature. Or as the blogger Meg Clark put it, the “hot mess.” With Madame Bovary people weren’t like: “Oh my god Gustave your heroine is a drip.” But with Edna Pontellier in Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, a novel modeled on Flaubert’s work, critics were scathing, saying they didn’t care for her character’s “torment” and she was also basically ostracized afterwards. Why this difference?

EZ: But Chopin got the last laugh (maybe? actually this is territory I'm not so familiar with), because high schools and colleges teach that book now as a classic. (I think I wrote about The Awakening for the essay section of an AP test. Although admittedly I don't remember ... anything about it. So that's maybe irrelevant.)

Green Girl has also gotten a lot of wonderful praise — the Bookforum and Vanity Fair reviews in particular, plus you've got all five-star reviews on your Amazon page.

Another thought, and this is sort of moving sideways, but it's something I think Green Girl does a great job of illustrating — how female beauty (also beauty in general) affects its possessor. A beautiful girl like Ruth produces a strong response in others (i.e. makes them want to be near her), but ultimately it's not part of her personality or something she earned, so she has this massive power that it isn't actually "hers," if that makes sense. (I mean, it is, but it's not something she created.) (And then who *is* she, and would anyone want to be near her if they knew that person? And if her inner self were unpleasant, maybe just keep it hidden beneath beauty?) So it's almost like this cloth over the birdcage, and she's like "I think there's a bird in here, wanna see?" but everyone else is just like "stop chirping, you're rustling the cloth, we like the cloth." Or, being beautiful as a gift and a curse that gives unusually much when people are at their most beautiful and takes the most when people feel that beauty fading, because it seems easy to mistake it for personality. (See: all the plastic surgery slippery slopes.) Or, maybe I'm rambling/not making sense. But I do really admire how you addressed that. The separation between the inside and the outside. Figuring out where they meet.

Also Ruth would totally have a Tumblr. Excellent call. (GreenGirl.tumblr.com appears to be taken, though. Not that she'd name her Tumblr after the book.)

I hope people buy the book, read it, and discuss it — I'm really curious to know more people's thoughts. Also I'm looking forward to your April 25 reading in New York!

Is there anything else you'd want to talk about here? I both want to go on and on, but also not get too carried away. Pique interest without overstimulating. But what do you think?

(Oh, also The Hour of the Star sounds so good!)

KZ: Yes — it's amazing! You should totally read it. There's a new translation too, by biographer Benjamin Moser, in a hot new candy-colored edition. And I like what you write here — I think more than Ruth being beautiful, it’s about her being concerned and aware of being the perfect image on the outside — the archetypal blonde, the young pretty girl — being so aware of how others looked at her, and this alienation, this gap, between her interior and her surface. Yes “figuring out where they meet.” I like that. I think that’s a lot of what the book’s about, for me.

I’m glad we had this discussion. I felt, when I read your piece, that you’re someone whose wit and community-building I had always admired, so I felt that we could have a good conversation about the book. Books are meant to be discussed, debated. I’m glad we did. And about the praise — it’s gotten some pretty gratifying praise, definitely, which is maybe why it was chosen. Although, I think what was interesting about the Tournament of Books hullabaloo is that I was obviously really an outsider, both in terms of why I write, and what my obsessions are as a writer, and in terms of status. I mean, I’ve never been reviewed in The New York Times Book Review, Ye Olde Gray Lady, I’m pretty sure I’m not on their radar, I don’t have an agent, or a publicist, or a billboard, I’m not published by a major press, or even a major indie. I don’t make money as a writer. I have four Amazon reviews, yes, so far (I’m imagining if any of these Tournament people go to my Amazon page they won’t be all five-stars anymore) but I’m pretty sure Jeffrey Eugenides has like five million or something.  I don’t know. That’s obviously hyperbolic. I guess to me Eugenides, who in many ways I admire, is like the writer’s equivalent of — Coldplay. And me? Maybe I’m more Riot Grrrl, or something. (I love St. Vincent, but pretty sure I’m not the St. Vincent equivalent of writer. I’d love to read that writer, though.)

But what kind of unnerved me, initially, was some of the commentariat’s assumption that … I’m not as passionate or involved or full-time in being a writer. That I’m not a capital-W writer whatever that is. The line kept on circulating in my head: Mr. Fitzgerald is a novelist, Mrs. Fitzgerald is a novelty. But even though I really don’t get paid to write, it is my full-time, intense, all-encompassing thing. And I have fun doing it. Most of the time! Sometimes a panicky, hair-pulling, agonized fun … I guess that doesn’t sound like fun. But anyway. I had fun doing this, Edith. Thank you! And if any of The Hairpin readers have questions for me, about Green Girl specifically or just writing, I’d be happy to answer.

Green Girl is available now; Kate Zambreno will also be reading in Durham, Atlanta, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, and New York in the coming months.

118 Comments / Post A Comment

thebestjasmine

This is awesome. I loved this, and your Tournament of Books piece, Edith! And you talk about The Awakening, one of those high school canon books that I adored. And now I want to read Green Girl.

Terry Vale@facebook

Dude, I agree with you 100%. I have been looking into getting the book aswell. Thanks. Terry V

saythatscool

Kate, how old are you? And are you working on anything new?

katez

@saythatscool Hi! I'm 34. Yes! Always working on new stuff, but after recently finishing the critical memoir (Heroines) that I've been working on a few years am a bit drained. Plus have new-puppy syndrome. Which I find is taking up a lot of time! But I am working on an essay for a talk I'm giving at Naropa in May that's specifically about: Caitlin Flanagan and the hysterical cheerleaders in upstate NY, Jonathan Franzen, blogging, the creative process, but more generally about fury and how to write fury. Also have started to think about an essay collection on girlhood and desire, kind of countering Flanagan, called Slapping Clark Gable. And a novelly like monster thing called Under the Shadow of My Roof.

Bus Driver Stu Benedict

@katez Since stc's taken an interest in you, you might want to keep an eye out for any windowless vans in the neighborhood. He's something of a "collector."

Cat named Virtute

@katez I would read the heck out of all of those things. So looking forward to reading your work!

saythatscool

@Bus Driver Stu Benedict I assume you're referring to "Exit ...Van Left" and we will talk about it in the van!

chickaboom

@katez that sounds awesome. i am interested in all of those things. ... p.s. i just bought green girl for my kindle and can't wait to read it, because i myself am a nameless foreigner in a european city and have been getting more and more fascinated by girls' portrayal and reception in fiction basically since i became a nameless foreigner in this european city. thanks for this great interview, both of you!

katez

@chickaboom Well I hope you get something out of it! I think the experience of living in London really took me to that place to write this book. so much of the modernists' writing was a sort of travel writing - Jean Rhys is the best novelist of being the nameless foreign girl in a european city - Voyage in the Dark and Good, Morning Midnight are amazing.I reread GMM constantly.

chickaboom

@katez thanks for the recs! i'll check out jean rhys for sure. i have a lot i want to write about my experience here being alone and foreign, and yet i struggle when it comes to actually writing it into something. the struggle comes partly from the privilege inherent in being abroad, but mostly from the way i feel that literary society — or whatever you want to call it — has made me think about the young-girl-in-a-city: i.e., that her experiences aren't interesting.

but they're interesting to me. yet i can't turn off that voice in my head.

katez

@chickaboom I think sometimes writing is learning how to turn off, or commune with, those voices in our head that tell us we can't write something (or that drawing from our own experiences for literature is somehow fraudulent). Don't believe that your experiences and observations aren't all potentially the valid stuff of literature. Sigh. But it's hard sometimes to have that tremendous ego in which to write, isn't it? Heroines deals with this, almost exclusively.

katez

@katez Also there's a interview with Jeanette Winterson published in Salon.com today that gets at some of these ideas. http://www.salon.com/2012/03/19/men_experiment_women_experience/singleton/

Bus Driver Stu Benedict

@saythatscool No ether this time, k? I have needs too.

Mariajoseh

I was really anxious while reading this, I think because both Edith and Kate were in a very vulnerable place: what if someone said someting awful about the other's writing?? . But in the end I like Edith even MORE than before, and Kate seems awesome too. This is why I love talking about books. Some people make it terrible, but conversations like this one are worth having

redheaded&crazy

@Mariajoseh For real. Two classy ladies being super classy. I mean that sincerely (of course!)

feartie

@Mariajoseh Yes. Bookchat forever, really. The part about the birdcage is just wonderful

And everyone should also go and read The Hour of the Star if you haven't already.

Mariajoseh

@feartie Lispector has been in my to-read list for a while, but lately I keep finding her name and books everywhere. The world is trying to tell me something. I just finished the 2 books I was reading, so I'm allowed to buy two more. (BTW, the ones I finished are Open Secrets by Alice Munro and ¿Hay vida en la tierra?, by Juan Villoro. Loved them both, and if someone speaks Spanish, you better read Villoro. He is my favorite mexican writer alive)

feartie

@Mariajoseh Some books seem to find the right time to be read; you are just in the perfect state of mind for them. It doesn't always happen, but when it does, I say go for it.

redonion

@feartie I added The Hour of the Star to my "to read" list a week or two ago and then added Green Girl after you recommended it in that other comment thread, so perhaps I just need to ask you when in need of future book suggestions.

(@Mariajoseh I just found a Juan Villoro story and an essay translated for n+1, so despite my lack of Spanish, I am looking forward to reading those).

Cat named Virtute

@Mariajoseh Yes, this is what I was trying to get at below, but I think you've put it more elegantly.

Mariajoseh

@redonion oh good! I just checked and n+1 has some of his fiction too. I'm such a fan girl, but no other writer makes me laugh and think so much.
I will be reading Lispector this month! Thank you all for this booktalk :)

Cat named Virtute

REALLY looking forward to reading this book!

And Edith, I thought this was such a lovely, graceful follow-up to your initial review. I wish I could see more of this and less of Jonathan Franzen being a blowhard in my literary journalism!

travelmugs

@Marika Pea@twitter Really, less of Jonathan Franzen being a blowhard in my everything.

stuffisthings

@Marika Pea@twitter Jonathan Franzen, if you're reading this (hah) I'd like to broker a truce of sorts. You refrain from writing blowhard nonsense, and everyone on the Internet will refrain from talking about how you sometimes write blowhard nonsense whenever any other author or Literature is mentioned in any context. Deal?

Cat named Virtute

@stuffisthings Touché.

FoxyRoxy

Loved this book and really enjoyed this conversation.

alliepants

Edith! I have been thinking so much about the effect of being really freaking beautiful (especially as a young woman) on personality. It's such an interesting thing... it doesn't necessarily turn people into Betty Draper monsters, but it definitely does *something*. I have some friends who are crazy pretty, and it's interesting to see how they approach other people, because most other people want something from them (their pretty! give us all the pretty!).

atipofthehat

@alliepants

Not all knockouts are like this, however.

Lily Rowan

@atipofthehat I mean, Edith seems OK!

atipofthehat

@Lily Rowan

Sure, but if you let a lady's secret bird out of its cage, and it lands on your shoulder and sings delightfully in your ear, you'd also better have a good drycleaner.

sox
sox

@alliepants My (ex-step)sister is knockout beautiful and since I don't watch Madmen (I KNOW) I can't make a call on her Betty Draperism, but, uh, let's just say I got tired of sending my shirts to the drycleaner and eventually had to cut ties because of her interactions and expectations of those around her.

Atheist Watermelon

@sox that episode of 30 Rock with Jon Hamm ("the bubble"), anyone? where they go into barney greengrass and liz covers up his face and tries to order off the menu and the waitress tells her that if she tries to order off the menu again, she'll cut her face? Yeah. No, of course, not all gorgeous people live in the bubble, but a big proportion of them definitely live in a slightly less exaggerated version of it...

Jane Err

I enjoyed this immensely, as well as Edith's original review. I'm definitely looking forward to reading Green Girl, but I'm almost more looking forward to Heroines. It sounds amazing.

Alibi Jones

Thank you so much to both Kate and Edith for doing this follow-up. It's great to get more in-depth discussion of the book and how Edith responded to it, as well as how others responded to her response. So interesting! Green Girl wasn't on my radar before the Tournament of Books so I haven't read it yet, but I am very much looking forward to it after this.

alicia

well, this definitely made me want to read it! i purchased the kindle copy just now.

atipofthehat

Thanks for doing this, Edith Z. and Kate Z.

I also hope we see more of this kind of feature.

anachronistique

So, so great. I haven't read Green Girl but I now want to buy flowers for Kate Z. And go add everything mentioned in this interview to my reading list.

Tatyana

So refreshing to read an interview with a young, female novelist who references almost entirely amazing, lesser-known female writers that I also love (Clarice Lispector, Jane Bowles, Jean Rhys, et al). Looking forward to reading Green Girl!

Nicole Cliffe

I know we have a tendency towards "and this is why I luffff the Hairpinnnnn," but this exchange is absolutely why I love the Hairpin.

femme cassidy

Ooh, I'm so into this! I found Green Girl fascinating and am still thinking about it weeks later--I was super interested in what you did with the tension between narrator and protagonist. I want to say it was a very good book that I didn't enjoy much, though that maybe sounds more harsh than what I mean. Thank you for this interview! PS how do you publish a novel without an agent, this is relevant to my interests.

katez

@femme cassidy Well I think sometimes there's different levels of pleasure when reading...for me if a book sticks with you longer, than that's something. But thank you anyway, for your careful read.

At the moment I publish in the independent press (small presses, and then Semiotext(e) is distributed by MIT Press), I guess a comparison would be to the music indie labels - there's big indies, smaller indies, etc. My first novel, O Fallen Angel, won a first-novel contest run by Lidia Yuknavitch's Chiasmus Press. Many small-press writers I know have agents, but at this point I don't think it's necessary to publish on an independent press, or it hasn't been for me. If you want to publish in small press, I would just become familiar with presses and what they publish (Small Press Distribution is a great place for that, just check out their fiction bestsellers). In Portland Powell's has a great indie selection, as does Skylight or McNally Jackson or St. Marks in NYC have pretty good ones as well. And then you can enter contests, or you can submit during open reading periods. I often will query an editor directly with a concise, interesting pitch, and see if they want more, which is the same way to query an agent. Hope this helps!

femme cassidy

@katez Oh my gosh, thank you for your super-thoughtful answer! I think you're right that there are different kinds of pleasure in reading--Green Girl demands a certain level of engagement from the reader that doesn't really have anything to do with, like, escapist beach reading, I think is what I meant? I felt like I had to actively navigate my role in relation to the characters, rather than just relaxing and being swept along by the plot.

Also we spent like half of my book club meeting last night discussing Green Girl even though it wasn't actually the book we were meeting about, so. Thank you for giving me so much to think about! You are awesome!

katez

@femme cassidy you guys should read it for book club! i've heard it's a good book club pick - i mean that there's a lot to discuss. the fabulous writer colleen o'connor wrote an essay about reading green girl in a book club setting - i dont' think it's slated to be published anywhere yet though.

fuck fuck fuck

argh a couple of the comments on the original review made me angry/sad. NO ONE ATTACKS MY HAIRPIN.

lizaboots

@lighter fluid I find it weird how the criticisms directed at The Hairpin seem to focus on the writers being too likable. "If only the internet were nastier and more rabid, and less sensitive and thoughtful."

atipofthehat

@lighter fluid

Someone called Edith "snarky," which suggests they don't understand Edith or get that this is 2012.

atipofthehat

@atipofthehat

Or is it October 1, 2007, when someone derided "a particularly snarky Gawker commenter"?

Life took a bitter turn that day.

fleurdelivre

Kate! Do you have a way for us to contact you if we want to have a less-private-than-a-comment-thread discussion? Or is this the only game in town?

katez

@fleurdelivre francesfarmerismysister@gmail.com

lizaboots

EDITHHHH. Where can I preorder the book you would love to make?

atipofthehat

@lizaboots

Yes, Edith, please write a book (in your copious free time!).

young preeezy

Not that I'm impatient, but how likely is it that Green Girl is available at B&N or a local, independent bookstore? I tried to see if there was a "pick up in store" option for B&N but no luck. Again, I have no problem going through Amazon, but I'm in total "GAH MUST START READING TONIGHT" mode.

katez

@prizzzle Hi Prizzle! Because of this Tournament of Books thing I think some (but by no means all) independent book stores carry it. It depends where you live! But not B&N, alas. There's always Kindle!

young preeezy

@katez Thanks!

Philippa Snow@facebook

The reviews that I've read of Green Girl make me feel as though I would loathe the lead character (everybody who's been to art school met a lot of these 'green girls' along the way, I think), but I don't know that that matters all that much. I'm still fairly interested to read it.

1963248500@twitter

Because of this Tournament of Books thing I think some (but by no means all) independent book stores carry it buy youtube views

bill.marks

I do wonder whether there’s more vitriol/hate/condescension leveled at women writers, especially women writers who feature young women as their main characters — a conflation with the author and the character, for instance. download games for free

1963248500@twitter

I do wonder whether there’s more vitriol/hate/condescension leveled at women writers, especially women writers who feature young women as their main characters — a conflation with the author and the character, for instance. free criminal background check

1963248500@twitter

tell me that I need to stop Googling myself, reading my reviews. I’m ondescension leveled at women writers, especially women writers who feature young women as their main characters — a conflation with the author and the character, for instance. High PR blog comments

1963248500@twitter

People then called my review "lazy" and said it was the "sorriest" part of the tournament so far. So, it was an exciting day! Ha. I can only imagine what's it like seeing your book dissected online. vf streaming

1963248500@twitter

tell me that I need to stop Googling myself, reading my reviews. I’m still trying to figure that out. I do wonder whether there’s more vitriol/hate/condescension leveled at women writers, especially women writers who feature young women as their main characters — a conflation with the author and the character, for instance. Blog comment Service

1963248500@twitter

I mean, they go for the throat. And almost overwhelmingly people who were commenting about this seemed to just really passionately hate the book. Initially I was really shocked by it, and felt really raw and sensitive about it. It was a lot to calibrate. vf streaming

1963248500@twitter

I mean, they go for the throat. And almost overwhelmingly people who were commenting about this seemed to just really passionately hate the book. Initially I was really shocked by it, and felt really raw and sensitive about it. It was a lot to calibrate. 24 hour san diego lawyer

1963248500@twitter

People then called my review "lazy" and said it was the "sorriest" part of the tournament so far. So, it was an exciting day! Ha. I can only imagine what's it like seeing your book dissected online. ibcbet

linkaccu

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1963248500@twitter

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1963248500@twitter

I didn't mention the narrator mostly because I didn't know what to make of her. I thought of her as a sort of mysterious, nebulously motherly figure (Ruth's creator?), although I didn't feel confident enough to say so. Afraid I'd missed something. Concepto de

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tell me that I need to stop Googling myself, reading my reviews. I’m still trying to figure that out. I do wonder whether there’s more vitriol/hate/condescension leveled at women writers, especially women writers who feature young women as their main characters — a conflation with the author and the character, for instance. the venus factor

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I wanted her and Agnes to be banal and boring sometimes. I love Ruth though. I love her, I loathe her. I think I am asking whether this loathing comes somewhat out of our culture. I was interested in the role of the blonde ingénue as a Hollywood construct (when writing the book I was really aware of all these Saw-like horror films, or like Catherine Deneuve in Roman Polanski’s Repulsion), the blonde as this victim character. I was also kind of obsessed with celebutantes like Britney Spears and Lindsay Lohan, and their quite public unraveling and the way the media functioned as a cruel coliseum. So for me there was a whole other fascinating layer to the Tournament of Books spectacle — the passionate vitriol directed at Ruth — that is basically doubling what I was investigating and even echoing the book’s own narrator. Yet, I don’t think Ruth is entirely a wet-blanket — I see glimmers of possibility in Ruth, the sort of coming to consciousness. A watchfulness, an intensity. pure garcinia cambogia

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So, my question is: do you like Ruth? Or: how do you feel about Ruth? I kind of wish Ruth could be with us on this email thread, although it's hard to imagine her on the computer. (Would she have a Facebook profile?) Michelle Lee

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Tournament of Books spectacle — the passionate vitriol directed at Ruth — that is basically doubling what I was investigating and even echoing the book’s own narrator. Yet, I don’t think Ruth is entirely a wet-blanket — I see glimmers of possibility in Ruth, the sort of coming to consciousness. A watchfulness, an intensit
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argh a couple of the comments on the original review made me angry/sad. NO ONE ATTACKS MY HAIRPIN.North Carolina

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Or is it October 1, 2007, when someone derided "a particularly snarky Gawker commenter"?

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@katez Oh my gosh, thank you for your super-thoughtful answer! I think you're right that there are different kinds of pleasure in reading--Green Girl demands a certain level of engagement from the reader that doesn't really have anything to do with, like, escapist beach reading, I think is what I meant? I felt like I had to actively navigate my role in relation to the characters, rather than just relaxing and being swept along by the plot. topical vitamin c

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Edith! I have been thinking so much about the effect of being really freaking beautiful (especially as a young woman) on personality. It's such an interesting thing... it doesn't necessarily turn people into Betty Draper monsters, but it definitely does *something*. I have some friends who are crazy pretty, and it's interesting to see how they approach other people, because most other people want something from them (their pretty! give us all the pretty!). serum for face

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But what kind of unnerved me, initially, was some of the commentariat’s assumption that … I’m not as passionate or involved or full-time in being a writer. That I’m not a capital-W writer whatever that is. The line kept on circulating in my head: Mr. Fitzgerald is a novelist, Mrs. Fitzgerald is a novelty. But even though I really don’t get paid to write, it is my full-time, intense, all-encompassing thing. And I have fun doing it. Most of the time! Sometimes a panicky, hair-pulling, agonized fun … I guess that doesn’t sound like fun. But anyway. I had fun doing this, Edith. Thank you! And if any of The Hairpin readers have questions for me, about Green Girl specifically or just writing, I’d be happy to answer.
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tell me that I need to stop Googling myself, reading my reviews. I’m still trying to figure that out. I do wonder whether there’s more vitriol/hate/condescension leveled at women writers, especially women writers who feature young women as their main characters — a conflation with the author and the character, for instance. vitamin c skin serum

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I was writing the review, someone I didn't know emailed me, sort of magically (almost spookily) out of the blue to say: 5 best ways to lose weight

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h, I'm so into this! I found Green Girl fascinating and am still thinking about it weeks later--I was super interested in what you did with the tension between narrator and protagonist. I want to say it was a very good book that I didn't enjoy much, though that maybe sounds more harsh than what I mean. ThanV auto approved dofollow blog comment

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just read Green Girl, by Kate Zambreno, and it has just blown my tiny little heart to shreds. I'm writing in the hope that one of you might like to do a feature on it, or interview the author. So then I could join in the conversation in the comments because I just have so many feelings and opinions about this book. I Heart Music

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@redonion oh good! I just checked and n+1 has some of his fiction too. I'm such a fan girl, but no other writer makes me laugh and think so much.
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Not that I'm impatient, but how likely is it that Green Girl is available at B&N or a local, independent bookstore? I tried to see if there was a "pick up in store" option for B&N but no luck. Again, I have no problem going through Amazon, but I'm in total "GAH MUST START READING TONIGHT" mode. carpet cleaning balham

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But I was surprised sometimes at the level of vitriol that seemed really personal — towards my intellectual capabilities or talent as a writer, for instance, or towards the main character, that didn’t recognize that part of the frame of the novel is having a narrator who was commenting on and interrogating this character as well. I took it personally personal path to pregnancy

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just read Green Girl, by Kate Zambreno, and it has just blown my tiny little heart to shreds. I'm writing in the hope that one of you might like to do a feature on it, or interview the author. So then I could join in the conversation in the comments because I just have so many feelings and opinions about this book. cards against humanity online

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I was writing the review, someone I didn't know emailed me, sort of magically (almost spookily) out of the blue to say:more info here

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